Keep ’em guessing – New eBook Fiction in March

Do you ever wonder about your neighbours? Sure, they look normal, but everyone’s got a secret or two. Several of this month’s new releases on Overdrive address this very question, including Marina Lewycka‘s latest novel, The Lubetkin Legacy. Add in great new crime fiction set in Belfast and Detroit, and you’ll have enough mystery to keep the whole street guessing!

Overdrive cover The Lubetkin Legacy, by Marina Lewycka
“North London in the twenty-first century: a place where a son will adopt an old lady to impersonate his departed mother, rather than lose the council flat. A time of golden job opportunities, though you might have to dress up as a coffee bean or work as an intern at an undertaker. A place rich in language – whether it’s Romanian, Russian or buxom housing officers talking managementese. Marina Lewycka is back in this hilarious, farcical, tender novel of modern issues and manners.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Telex from Cuba, by Rachel Kushner
“Fidel and Raúl Castro are in the hills, descending only to burn sugarcane plantations and recruit rebels. Rachel K. is in Havana’s Cabaret Tokio, entangled with a French agitator trying to escape his shameful past. Everly and K.C. are growing up in the dying days of a crumbling American colony, about to discover the cruelty and violence that have created their childhood idyll.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Police at the Station and They Don’t Look Friendly, by Adrian McKinty
“Belfast 1988: a man has been shot in the back with an arrow. It ain’t Injuns and it isn’t Robin Hood. But uncovering exactly who has done it will take Detective Inspector Sean Duffy down his most dangerous road yet, a road that leads to a lonely clearing on the high bog where three masked gunmen will force Duffy to dig his own grave.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, by Jonathan Safran Foer
“Nine-year-old Oskar Schell is an inventor, amateur entomologist, Francophile, letter writer, pacifist, natural historian, percussionist, romantic, Great Explorer, jeweller, detective, vegan and collector of butterflies. When his father is killed in the September 11th attacks, Oskar sets out to solve the mystery of a key he discovers in his father’s closet. It is a search that will lead him through New York, history and himself towards some kind of peace.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover The Flea Palace, by Elif Shafak
“Bonbon Palace was once a stately apartment block in Istanbul. Now it is a dilapidated home to ten wildly different individuals. There’s a womanising, hard-drinking academic with a penchant for philosophy; a ‘clean freak’ and her lice-ridden daughter; a lapsed Jew in search of true love; and a charmingly naïve mistress. When the garbage at Bonbon Palace is stolen, a mysterious sequence of events unfolds that result in a soul-searching quest for truth.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover My Sister’s Bones, by Nuala Ellwood
“Kate Rafter is a high-flying war reporter. She’s the strong one. The one who escaped Herne Bay and their father. Her sister Sally didn’t. Instead, she drinks. But when their mother dies, Kate is forced to return to the old family home. And on her first night she is woken by a terrifying scream. What secret has Kate stumbled upon? And is she strong enough to uncover the truth . . . and make it out alive?” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Mackenzie’s Mountain, by Linda Howard
“Mary Elizabeth Potter is a self-appointed spinster with no illusions about love. When she meets Wolf Mackenzie, a man with a chip on his shoulder the size of Wyoming, she sets out to convince the whole town he’s a man worth loving. But Wolf’s not sure he’s ready for the taming of Wolf Mackenzie.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Fear, by Dirk Kurbjuweit
“Randolph insists he had a normal childhood, though his father kept thirty loaded guns in the house. Now he has an attractive, intelligent wife and two children, enjoys modest success and has just moved into a beautiful flat in a respectable part of Berlin. Life seems perfect—until his wife, Rebecca, meets the man living in the basement below. Their downstairs neighbour is friendly at first, but soon he starts to frighten them—and when Randolph fails to act, the situation quickly spins out of control.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover August Snow, by Stephen Mack Jones
“Tough, smart, and struggling to stay afloat, former detective August Snow is the embodiment of Detroit. It’s not long before he’s summoned to the home of business magnate Eleanore Paget, who wants August to investigate the increasingly unusual happenings at her private wealth management bank. August declines, and a day later, Paget is dead. What begins as an inquiry into Paget’s death soon drags August into a rat’s nest of Detroit’s most dangerous criminals.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Cry, the Beloved Country, by Alan Paton
Cry the Beloved Country is the deeply moving story of the Zulu pastor Stephen Kumalo and his son Absalom, set against the background of a land and a people riven by racial injustice. Remarkable for its contemporaneity, unforgettable for character and incident, Cry the Beloved Country is a work of love and hope, courage and endurance, born of the dignity of man.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Prophetic insights – New eBook Fiction

What will 2017 bring? It’s hard to say with certainty, but perhaps some clues lie in this month’s new releases from Overdrive. Will there be drama and mystery as seen in The Paris Librarian? Tragedy and conflict as portrayed by Even in Paradise? Or the dark humour of The Unthinkable Thoughts of Jacob Green? For more prophetic insights, sign up now!

Overdrive cover The Unthinkable Thoughts of Jacob Green, by Joshua Braff
“Jacob Green doesn’t mean to disappoint his family, but he can’t help thinking the most unthinkable (and very funny) thoughts. If only he could confront his overbearing father and tell him he doesn’t want to sing in synagogue, attend est classes or write the perfect thank-you note. But, of course, he can’t. That would be unthinkable.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Forty Rooms, by Olga Grushin
“A modern woman will inhabit forty rooms in her lifetime. They form her biography, from childhood to death. For our protagonist, the first rooms she is aware of are those that make up her family’s Moscow apartment. We follow this child as she leaves home to study in America, and discovers sexual happiness and love. But her hunger for adventure will open up more ambiguous rooms, rooms full of ghosts and unknown trade-offs.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover One Hundred Twenty-One Days, by Michèle Audin
“This debut novel by mathematician and Oulipo member Michèle Audin retraces the lives of French mathematicians over several generations through World Wars I and II. The narrative oscillates stylistically from chapter to chapter—at times a novel, fable, historical research or diary—locking and unlocking codes, culminating in a captivating, original reading experience.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover The Dying Trade, by Peter Corris
“Meet Cliff Hardy. Smoker, drinker, ex-boxer. And private investigator. When the wealthy Bryn Gutteridge hires Hardy to help his sister, it looks as if blackmail is the problem. Until the case becomes more brutal, twisted and shocking than even Hardy could have guessed. Described by The Age as ‘a quintessentially Australian literary icon.'” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Even in Paradise, by Elizabeth Nunez
“Peter Ducksworth, a Trinidadian widower of English ancestry, retires to Barbados. He decides to divide his land among his three daughters while he is alive, his intention not unlike that of King Lear. But Lear made the fatal mistake of confusing flattery with love, and so does Ducksworth. Feeling snubbed by his youngest daughter, Ducksworth decides that only after he dies will she receive her portion of the land, setting in motion the very strife he hoped to prevent.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover The Paris Librarian, by Mark Pryor
“Hugo Marston’s friend Paul Rogers dies unexpectedly in a locked room at the American Library in Paris. The police conclude that Rogers died of natural causes, but Hugo is certain mischief is afoot. As Hugo delves into the library’s stacks, he begins to hear rumours about a famous actress, a recently donated collection and a dagger. But to uncover the truth, he must return to the scene of a decades-old crime.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Some Women, by Emily Liebert
“Annabel Ford has everything under control, but when her husband announces that he’s leaving, she’s blind-sided. Piper Whitley has done her best to balance it all—raising her daughter Fern by herself while advancing her career. Only now that she’s met the man of her dreams, Fern’s absentee father shows up, throwing everything into a tailspin. Mackenzie Mead has many reasons to count her blessings, but with an imperious mother-in-law and a husband with whom she can no longer connect, something has to give.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover The Bohr Maker, by Linda Nagata
“Nanotechnology saturates the world, but strict laws regulate its use, and death follows for those caught in violation. The threat of death means little though, to a man already condemned to die. Nikko—post human, desperate to escape his fate—steals a forbidden nanomachine. But the theft goes awry and the nanomachine escapes into the wild–igniting a desperate race to contain it before the definition of ‘human’ changes for all time.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)

Overdrive cover Heart of Darkness, by Joseph Conrad
Heart of Darkness tells the story of Charles Marlow, an English man who journeys into the African jungle. The difference between Conrad’s novella and other classic adventure fictions, like Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe, is that Heart of Darkness goes beyond classic motifs to explicitly deal with questions of racism, exploitation and colonization. Readers ultimately understand that the darkness of the title does not only stand for the horrors in the African wilderness, but for the cruelty of the colonizer’s heart.” (Adapted from the Overdrive description.)