Expand your holiday reading: Visit Te Pātaka on 8 December

Our Te Pātaka Collection and Distribution Centre houses Wellington Central Library’s collection, and for one day only you can visit, browse and borrow!

Photo of our Te Pataka warehouse team, waving hello

Looking for some special holiday reading? Want to delve into a topic more deeply? Or maybe you’re interested in finding the perfect gem?

We’ll be opening our Te Pātaka Collection Centre to the public for a pre-holiday exploration. You’ll be able to browse and borrow books from all parts of our off-site storage lending collection, including:

  • Fiction, including mysteries, sci-fi
  • Non-fiction – small and large books on all your favourite topics
  • Biographies
  • Large print
  • World languages
  • Graphic novels
  • Teen fiction, non-fiction and graphic novels
  • Children’s fiction, non-fiction and comics
  • Picture books

COVID guidelines

When visiting:

  • If you are aged 12 years, 3 months and over, you will be required to show your COVID Vaccine Pass (CVP)
  • Wear a mask if you are 12 years and over – unless you hold an exemption from the Ministry of Health Covid-19 website
  • Staff will also be wearing masks unless they are not required to for safety reasons
  • Scanning or signing in is a condition of entry for all Council facilities and venues. This applies to visitors, contractors and couriers entering our spaces
  • Please respect 2 metres social distancing – and follow the signs and guidance of our staff

Books will be issued for 6 weeks. We can’t wait to see you!

Spots are limited and visits are restricted to one hour, so bookings will be essential — book your slot below!

Details:

What? Te Pātaka Open Day

Date: Wednesday 8 December

Time: Four one hour slots available — 10-11am, 11am-12pm, 1-2pm, and 2-3pm

Location: Johnsonville (details on registration)

Book your spot now!

Packing up Te Matapihi ki te Ao Nui (Wellington Central Library)

We are excited to have started carefully packing up Te Matapihi ki te Ao Nui – Wellington Central Library. Behind the hoardings, the experienced Crown Relocations team has begun the eight-week process of moving the historic fittings into storage for the next four years. This involves carefully removing, labelling, itemising, and wrapping the fixtures following the guidance of our heritage expert. They will also upcycle or recycle standard office furniture, or library equipment that is not going into storage or being used elsewhere within Council.

When?

They will work during the working week (Monday to Friday) and expect to finish by November, unless we experience a delay, such as an increase in Alert level.

How?

The team at Crown Relocation are working to lessen any noise for the neighbouring residents and businesses as much as they can by using the basement to move items out of the library. So please be aware of trucks entering and leaving the basement entrance on Harris Street.

If you’re walking into Te Ngākau Civic Precinct from Victoria Street you’ll see a small hoarding has been put up next to Te Matapihi ki te Ao Nui. Behind it is a temporary skip bin where any rubbish or broken equipment is being put. If you happen to be in the Precinct when the bin is being replaced, please follow the signage and instructions of the Crown Relocations staff to keep everyone safe.

What’s next?

Over the coming four years we’re strengthening and modernising Te Matapihi. This includes installing base isolators; expanding levels three and four; designing spaces for our Libraries, City Archives, Council Service Centre, and Capital E to bring back Wellington’s much-loved community living room in the CBD.

From October, we will share regular updates on how the design for Te Matapihi is progressing through our Wellington City Libraries and Council newsletters, social media and websites. So sign up or follow the latest news at www.wellington.govt.nz/news-and-events/news-and-information

Council News and Information

Central Library design principles agreed

Wellington City Council has adopted four principles that will guide the design for modernising the Central Library building within the remediation plans.

This includes extending the floor space and working with other organisations to offer people a broader range of services and innovative ways to engage with the collections.

“Wellingtonians were very clear when we consulted last year that we need a highly resilient central library building. Strengthening gives us the opportunity to hugely improve the library’s relationship to Te Ngākau Civic Square and surrounding streets, and to completely rethink its interior,” says Mayor Andy Foster.

“Future proofing the library, providing more space for people, and introducing new services and technology were also overwhelmingly supported by Wellingtonians.

“Today we adopted design principles that will guide the reshaping of the interior library space. These principles will provide much wanted technologies and ways to access the collection, along with new spaces and services for existing and new library users. I am particularly excited to confirm integration of Capital E, our City Archives and City Service Centre into the library, and that it will be an inclusive and more accessible building than before.

“I have no doubt that our Central Library, Te Matapihi, will rapidly become an even more treasured place for all Wellingtonians.”

“We also agreed to a modest (880sq metre) extension to the Level 3 and 4 office space that sits above the library proper. This extension will be net positive in terms of revenue to Council and make the existing office space more useable. We also agreed to making the building a 5-star green building which includes the consideration of a rooftop garden space in the design.”

At today’s meeting the Mayor put forward an amendment for officers to investigate the feasibility of including a Literary Hub within the Central Library which was adopted. This proposal was spoken to in the Public Participation part of the meeting by Claire Mabey of Verb Wellington, and Juliet Blyth of ReadNZ, who spoke on behalf of Te Ha, ReadNZ, Booksellers, Publisher’s Association and Verb Wellington.

The Council’s Libraries Portfolio Lead, Councillor Fleur Fitzsimons, says working with partners, including Mana Whenua, Capital E, the Council’s Service Centre and Wellington City Archives will uncover the potential for people to connect with the collections and spaces, and offer a broader range of services in innovative ways.

“As well as returning the aspects of the library people value such as spaces to study, connect and read the collection, we are investigating how we may provide new programmes, such as makerspaces. We are working through how this may look, which we plan to share in the coming months.

“One principle which starts today is calling the Central Library by its gifted name Te Matapihi ki te Ao Nui, which already sits above its entrances. This name, gifted by Te Taura Whiri o te reo Māori (Māori Language Commission) when the building originally opened, reflects the Library’s purpose ‘to open windows on the wide world’.

“Our libraries strive to be places where everyone is welcome and have opportunities to view the world in different ways, and for knowledge to be passed on.”

The design principles were developed through early engagement with Mana Whenua, key stakeholders, and potential partners, and our library teams. They also align to the draft design principles for Te Ngākau Civic Precinct. These were adopted, along with a few amendments, by the Council last Thursday.

The options to extend levels three and four will now be included in the detailed design process which is currently underway. We will share more information on the process and a further detailed Design and Service Level Brief in the coming month.

Background
The Central Library building was closed in March 2019 following an engineering assessment saying the way the floor was designed presented a high level of potential failure in a significant earthquake The Council moved quickly to set up an interim CBD library service at three new branches.
The Council then worked through a process with its consultant engineers to establish the range of options to remediate the Central Library building. Three schemes were scoped that offered low, mid, and high levels of resilience.

Following a Special Consultative Procedure in 2020, Council resolved to progress Option C, high-level remediation through base isolation, to the Long-term Plan (LTP) which is now open for public consultation. In the LTP the public is being asked for their views on how to fund the $187.4m library remediation project, and when the project should take place.

The preferred option includes the Council agreeing to temporarily breach its debt limit of 225% to ensure the library can be refurbished in the original timeframe and remain in public ownership.
The debt level will remain at 225%, and the Council has agreed to accept the breach in the first three years of this plan. This breach will be mitigated by any capital underspend being used for the library project rather than on new projects. Our debt level will be back below the limit by year 4 – 2024/25.

The other two options are to:

  • delay the project for up to three years until it can be funded within the Council’s current debt limit, or,
  • fund the project by increasing rates further.

More information about the options can be found on pages 42 and 43 of the consultation document.

More detail can be found in the Council meeting agenda for Thursday 15 April.

Visit our Central Library collection at Te Pātaka: One Night Only!

The Te Pātaka Collection and Distribution Centre houses Wellington Central Library’s collection, and for one night only you can visit, browse and borrow!

Looking for some special summertime reading? On the hunt for that perfect picture book? Or maybe you’re missing all those classic graphic novels?

We’ll be opening part of our Te Pātaka Collection Centre to the public for a pre-holiday exploration. You’ll be able to browse and borrow books from select parts of our off-site storage collection, including:

  • Fiction
  • Large print
  • Graphic novels
  • Teen fiction and graphic novels
  • Children’s fiction and comics
  • Picture books

Spots are limited and visits are restricted to one hour, so bookings will be essentialreserve yourself a spot now (choose one of the four slots). We can’t wait to see you!

Details:

What? Te Pātaka Open Night
Date: 17 December
Time: 4pm-7pm (limited to one hour slots)
Location: Johnsonville (details on registration)

Book your spot

Share your views on the Central Library by 5pm, Monday 7 September

Thank you to everyone who has made a submission on the future of the Central Library. If you haven’t had the chance to yet – it’s not too late!

You can make your submission by:

  • completing an online submission form
  • picking up a printed submission form from your nearest library branch
  • downloading a freepost printed submission form under the ‘Document library’. You can
  • post it to us on Monday 7 September and it will be counted
  • or scan and email it to centrallibrarysubmissions@wcc.govt.nz by 5pm, Monday 7 September.

Information to help inform your submission

We’ve put together a Statement of Proposal, which outlines the options; how they were assessed and others which were discarded.

You can pick one of the five proposed options, or provide your own idea, or say if you prefer an option which was not put forward.

We were fortunate to have a range of engaging speakers discuss the role of a Central Library; the potential opportunities for creating stronger spaces, connections and meaning for people who use them and the engineering challenges with the current building. You can watch videos of the three webinars below.

Future of the Central Library consultation

Webinar 1 : Who loves our libraries?

Our guest speakers were:

  • MC — Mayor Andy Foster
  • Claire Mabey, Verb Wellington
  • Ella Flavell, Chair Youth Council
  • Sandra McCallum, General Manager Changemakers

Watch the video here:

Webinar 2 : Spaces for everyone

Our guest speakers were:

  • MC — Councillor Fleur Fitzsimons
  • Anne Goulding, Professor of Information Services Management, Victoria University of Wellington
  • Chris Hay, Manager Tūranga Library & Chair-elect Public Libraries New Zealand Juliet Blyth, Chief Executive Read NZ

Watch the video here:

Webinar 3: Why the Central Library closed and restoring the service to Te Ngākau Civic Precinct

Our guest speaker was Tony Holden, Associate, Senior Structural Engineer Aurecon with Peter Brennan, Manager Property, Wellington City Council.

Watch the video here:

Our consultation website, www.letstalk.wellington.govt.nz/centrallibrary, provides news, frequently asked questions, links to key documents such as previous engineering documents and assessments.

If you have any questions you can use the “Ask a question” section towards the bottom of the homepage, or email centrallibrarysubmission@wcc.govt.nz

Thank you for taking the time to shape the future of our Central Library service.

New artwork surrounding Central Library celebrates life of Jacquie Baxter

And only sea is the title of a new artwork on the hoarding surrounding Wellington Central Library, designed by Mata Aho Collective in collaboration with Andre Te Hira. The artwork celebrates the civic and literary life of poet J.C. Sturm, also known as Jacquie Baxter. Baxter worked as a librarian at the Central Library for over twenty years. She was one of the first Māori women to complete an undergraduate degree, the first Māori woman to attain an MA in Philosophy, and also one of the first Māori women to appear in print.

New artwork being installed at Central Library

The artists chose to render one of her poems On the building site for a new library (published 1996), as the work references the construction of the Central Library and also Wellington city’s land reclamation where Civic Square was once underwater. The artwork acknowledges the civic location and literary connection, tells a story about the history of the land and people – connects to the area’s Māori heritage and geography, and celebrates the importance of libraries to our cities as places of learning, refuge and relaxation.

The new artwork provides vibrancy to the area as the long term future of the building and Te Ngākau — Civic Precinct is worked through. There will be a blessing for the new artwork on Sunday 15 December.

To find out more about Jacquie’s life, library staff have compiled a biography, shown below.

Let’s Boogie: Dance movies

NZ Dance Week is coming up (April 21 – 29) and Central Library is offering some evening events to celebrate it. For more details about the events, see our NZDW blog post. To get you in the mood, check out these DVDs and get ready to boogie!


La la land.
“Mia, an aspiring actress, serves lattes to movie stars in between auditions and Sebastian, a jazz musician, scrapes by playing cocktail party gigs in dingy bars, but as success mounts they are faced with decisions that begin to fray the fragile fabric of their love affair, and the dreams they worked so hard to maintain in each other threaten to rip them apart.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Billy Elliot.
“Set in a northern mining town, against the background of the 1984/’85 miner’s strikes. Billy’s journey takes him out of the boxing ring and into a ballet class where he discovers a passion for dance that inspires his family and whole community and changes his life forever.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Hip hop-eration.
“These senior citizens may each be almost a century young, but for Kara, (94) Maynie, (95) and Terri (93), the journey to Las Vegas and the World Hip Hop Dance Championships is just the beginning of a life’s journey. Along with twenty-four other nonagenarians they defy the odds and hip-hop their way into the hearts and minds of thousands of young fans from around the world. Along the way we hear how these extraordinary characters contributed to New Zealand as we know it. Their stories are a reminder of our history as a nation and the joy of living life to the fullest.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverPina.
“A film about the life and work of Pina Bausch, dancer and choreographer, who died in 2009 which features some of her greatest choreographies as performed by her Tanztheater Wuppertal ensemble.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

The red shoes.
“Film of the ballet based on the Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale of a young girl who cannot stop thinking about her red dancing shoes. In this modern version, Vicky Page finds herself caught between simple human passion and artistic devotion to the ballet.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverSwing time.
“Fred Astaire plays a gambler intent on raising $25,000 in New York in order to marry his fiance back home. Romantic complications occur when he meets dancing teacher, Ginger Rogers.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

The dancer
“French singer/actress Soko and Lily-Rose Depp lead a star-studded cast in Stephanie Di Giustos spectacularly mounted screen biography, inspired by the true story of two rival pioneers of modern dance and theatrical performance in late 19th-century Paris. Nothing in her background destined Loe Fuller (Soko) to become the toast of the Belle Epoque cabarets or to perform at the Paris Opera. However, meeting with Isadora Duncan (Depp) a beautiful young prodigy hungry for glory that threatened everything.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Shall we dance?.
A funny comedy set in Japan about a middle aged discontented workaholic who find his passion – and himself in ballroom dancing. A hilarious and highly recommended film! (Katie)

Footloose.
“A city boy comes to a small town where rock music and dancing have been banned.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Black swan.
In order for prima ballerina, Nina to embrace her dark side for her role as the white and black swan in Swan Lake, she loses grip on reality, as well as herself. Overall a gripping film that will have you on edge from start to finish and visualises the dark side of dance and ballet. It is also nice to see a darker and provocative side of Natalie Portman and is a welcome change from the sweet, innocent girly roles she has previously played. (Katie)

Strictly ballroom.
Things get messy in the world of Australian ballroom dancing – and dance politics when a championship ballroom dancer and his ugly duckling dance partner decide to compete together and break all the rules in dancing. Directed by Baz Luhrmann and part of “the red curtain trilogy”*, Strictly Ballroom is a great film with awesome dance moves, a killer soundtrack and a true celebration of dancing. [*The Red Curtain Trilogy has been described by Luhrmann as following a specific filmmaking technique, not necessarily a trilogy in the traditional sense. The Red Curtain Trilogy is the title given to the first three films directed by Baz Luhrmann: Strictly Ballroom, Romeo and Juliet and Moulin Rouge]. (Katie)

NZDW 2018 - Dance movies

Dancing Through the Pages @ Central

April 21 – 29 is NZ Dance Week #NZDW2018 and we are celebrating here at the Central Library with Dancing Through the Pages, a series of evening talks from some of Wellington’s finest performing artists talking about their craft with a short taste of their live performances as well!

Have you ever wanted to know what it takes to choreograph a work or compose music for dance? Or wondered what the day to day looks like for a dancer or how they shake stage-fright? Or are you just simply curious about their current reading lists? Dancing Through the Pages is a unique opportunity to meet artists at the top of their game with the chance to ask them any burning questions you have about their art-form.

So come along and fill your evenings with movement, music and intrigue among the book shelves!

What’s the Schedule?

Tuesday 24 April/ 6pm  –  Sensory Dance Theatre
Sacha Copland & Emma Coppersmith from Java Dance Theatre will give an insight into creating a sensory experience for theatre goers. Learn about Java’s immersive processes and how food can make a great stage companion and open up a world of ritual.

Thursday 26 April / 6pm – A Song & Dance
Come along and hear contemporary dancer/choreographer Lucy Marinkovich and jazz musician Lucien Johnson  talk about their creative partnership, following their 2017 award-winning dance-theatre show, Lobsters. Find out about collaboration and why it’s important in the arts, plus treat your ears to some smooth saxophone from Lucien.

Friday 27 April 6pm – A Choreographer at Work
Meet Loughlan Prior; dancer, choreographer, filmmaker and a Royal New Zealand Ballet staple. Come along to this final session of Dancing Through the Pages and hear Loughlan talk about his creative process, plus get a behind the scenes glimpse into the mechanics of choreographing a duet. Featuring special guests RNZB dancers Luke Cooper and Georgia Powley

 

Want to know more about the artists?

ABOUT JAVA DANCE THEATRE
Java Dance Theatre is dance theatre that gets under your skin. Founded in 2003 by New Zealand School of Dance graduate, Sacha Copland, Java captures audiences with visceral dance and captivating story-telling. Combining playful physicality, live music and audience immersion Java has captured hearts around New Zealand and the world. Their strong repertoire of original works includes The Wine Project, Dirt and Other Delicious Ingredients, Back of the Bus, The Creamery, Cheese, and Rise.

ABOUT BORDERLINE ARTS ENSEMBLE
The Borderline Arts Ensemble is a performing arts collective established by dancer and choreographer Lucy Marinkovich in 2015 to facilitate her contemporary dance and performance art works. In 2017 Borderline presented Good Good Fortune at the Performance Arcade (Wellington, NZ) and the George Town Arts Festival (Penang, Malaysia), as well as developing choreography for  The Shyness of Trees during an artist residency at Dance Nucleus in Singapore.  Borderline’s first full length dance-theatre work Lobsters premiered in an independent season at Circa Theatre and was the winner of three 2017 Wellington Theatre Awards.

ABOUT LOUGHLAN PRIOR
Loughlan Prior is an Aussie/Kiwi choreographer and performer based in Wellington, New Zealand. He is the choreographer in residence at the Royal New Zealand Ballet (RNZB) and the creative director of Prior Visual, a project based film collective. Loughlan has produced works for the RNZB, the New Zealand School of Dance and recently premiered a piece with the Grand Rapids Ballet in the United States. His film projects have met acclaim both nationally and internationally, his collaborative film Genome featured in Wellington’s treasured 2017 LUX Light Festival.

Can’t get enough of dance?

We completely understand! Not to worry, check out our Q&A with our speakers to find out more about their favourite dance books! Our Librarians have also been putting together some dance themed lists for your reading and viewing pleasure, check out our most recent Biographies Blog Modern Bodies: The Best of Dance Biographies and our latest movies blog of our favourite dance movies!

LitCrawl: True Stories Told Live at Central library

That’s right! It’s LitCrawl time again and that means it’s time to get excited because this year is going to be on a whole different level!

With the addition of LitCrawl Extended and events running across the whole weekend, starting on Friday 10th November all the way through to Sunday the 12th, it’s time to come into the library, grab your programme and start planning your crawl.

We will be hosting True Stories Told Live as part of LitCrawl Phase 1, starting at 6pm at the Central Library on Saturday November 11th.

This years theme is ‘Quiet Revolutions’. Totally unscripted, no power points or cue cards, just storytelling in its rawest form!

Featuring Makerita Urale, Witi Ihimaera, Hēmi Kelly, Renèe, Lucy Revill, Rajorshi Chakraborti and Eamonn Marra it’s going to be an unmissable event!

To help everyone get excited and pumped for their crawl, we’ve asked our librarians to share their recommendations. Just like True Stories Told Live, we just asked for everyone’s picks, no theme, no time, no parameters just Librarian’s choices, straight from the heart!

Syndetics book coverLinda’s Pick: Tess / Kirsten McDougall.
“In the silence she could hear the oncoming hum, like a large flock approaching. She didn’t want to hear his story; she’d had enough of them. Tess is on the run when she’s picked up from the side of the road by lonely middle-aged father Lewis Rose. With reluctance, she’s drawn into his family troubles and comes to know a life she never had. Set in Masterton at the turn of the millennium, Tess is a gothic love story about the ties that bind and tear a family apart.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverJamie’s Pick: Crisis four : a Nick Stone thriller / Andy McNab.
“Ex-SAS trooper Nick Stone is clever, ruthless and very effective, it is no surprise that he is hired by British Intelligence. Sarah Greenwood is beautiful, intelligent and cunning, and the only woman Stone has ever truly opened up to. But now he has been ordered to hunt her down. Hotly pursued through the American wilderness, Stone finds himself at the center of a deadly game of cat and mouse and must get to the heart of a terrifying conspiracy theory to which only Sarah holds the key.” (Adapted Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverFrith’s Pick: Iceland / Dominic Hoey.
“Aspiring musician Zlata meets graffiti artist and part-time drug dealer Hamish at a party. Together, they start to get their lives on track Zlata gets her record deal and album tour, and Hamish gets an exhibition of his art in Auckland, then in Tokyo. Then one of their group of friends kills someone, and everything starts to unravel as they deal (or not) with the aftermath” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTim’s Pick: Leave before you go / Emily Perkins.
No New Zealand novel better captures the sad ambience of finding yourself a little older than you feel ready for and also you’ve just locked yourself out of your flat again. In a good way.
“A generation’s dilemma: should we find real jobs & relationships & houses, or shall we sit here, watch TV & maybe think about going out later? Leave Before You Go is a witty novel from last year’s winner of the Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverReece’s Pick: The crossing / by Cormac McCarthy.
“In The Crossing, Cormac McCarthy fulfills the promise of All the Pretty Horses and at the same time give us a work that is darker and more visionary, a novel with the unstoppable momentum of a classic western and the elegaic power of a lost American myth.  An essential novel by any measure, this is a luminous and appalling book that touches, stops, and starts the heart and mind at once.” (Adapted Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverJess’ Pick: Daughter of the forest / Juliet Marillier.
“A tale of history and heritage, myth and magic, legend and love. Lord Colum of Sevenwaters is blessed with seven children, but it is Sorcha, the youngest and only daughter, who is destined to defend her family and protect their land. The only one who escapes the cruel influence of her father’s new wife, exiled and cast out into the forest and the terrifying world beyond, Sorcha falls into the hands of the feared enemy. Now she is torn between a life she has always known and a love that only comes once.” (Adapted Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverZuhara’s Pick: Gone with the wind / by Margaret Mitchell.
“Often remembered for the epic film, Gone With the Wind explores the depth of human passions with an intensity as bold as its setting in the red hills of Georgia. This is the tale of Scarlett O’Hara, the spoiled, manipulative daughter of a wealthy plantation owner, who arrives at young womanhood just in time to see the Civil War forever change her way of life. A sweeping story of tangled passion and courage, Margaret Mitchell brings to life the unforgettable characters that have captured readers for over seventy years.” (Adapted Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverPaul’s Pick: The unthinkable thoughts of Jacob Green : a novel / by Joshua Braff.
“It’s 1977, housewarming, Annie Hall and bar mitzvah parties punctuate Jacob Green’s childhood and require command performances by all the Green family members. Jacob doesn’t mean to disappoint his father, but he can’t help thinking the most unthinkable (and very funny) thoughts about public-school humiliation, Hebrew-school disinclination, and in-home sex education (with the live-in nanny!). This self-assured, comic, yet piercing first novel deftly captures the struggle of an imperfect boy trying to become a suitable son.” ( Adapted Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverBeth’s Pick: The English patient / Michael Ondaatje.
“Set during the end of World War II, this novel explores the lives of four very disparate people who find themselves holed up together in a ruined villa north of Florence as the war retreats around them. Michael Ondaatje is the author of Running in the Family and In the Skin of a Lion.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverLigia’s Pick: The book of disquiet / Fernando Pessoa ; edited by Jerónimo Pizarro; translated from the Portuguese by Margaret Jull Costa.
“An “autobiography” or “diary” containing exquisite melancholy observations, aphorisms, and ruminations, this classic work grapples with all the eternal questions. Now, for the first time the texts are presented chronologically, in a complete English edition by master translator Margaret Jull Costa.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverSela’s Pick: The bronze horseman / Paullina Simons.
“The war has not yet touched this city of fallen grandeur, or the lives of two sisters, Tatiana and Dasha Metanova. Their world is turned upside down when Hitler’s armies attack Russia and yet there is light in the darkness. Tatiana meets Alexander, a brave young officer in the Red Army. Tatiana and Alexander’s impossible love threatens to tear the family apart and expose Alexander’s dangerous secret, a secret as devastating as the war itself.” (Syndetics summary)

 

Litcrawl 2017

Remembering Jonathan Mane-Wheoki

Artwork at entrance to Central LibraryA memorial is currently underway which remembers a well known Wellington figure Jonathan Mane-Wheoki. The project includes NZ artist Shannon Novak installing a small artwork in 10 locations around Wellington – 10 locations Jonathan frequented and supported. Wellington Central Library was identified as one of the locations, and the artwork is now installed on a glass panel in the Ground floor entrance area. The installation is called “Pieces at an Exhibition” (named after his favourite musical piece).

Jonathan Ngarimu Mane-Wheoki CNZM (8 December 1943 – 10 October 2014) was a New Zealand art historian, academic, and curator. Of Ngāpuhi, Te Aupōuri, Ngāti Kurī and English descent, he was a pioneer in the study of contemporary Māori and Pacific art history. Jonathan invested much of his time and energy into the arts community in Wellington, including a stint as Director of Art and Collection services at the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa in 2004.

The library also has available a copy of Colonial Gothic to Māori renaissance : essays in memory of Jonathan Mane-Wheoki, edited by Conal McCarthy & Mark Stocker, which was recently launched by Victoria University Press.

Central Library update

2016-central2ndfloordeskThe Central Library’s Second Floor will remain closed to customers for at least the next week. The public areas such as the Travel, History and Local Heritage sections are in excellent condition, but many bays in the magazines storage room at the northern end were damaged.  These have now been cleared and the stack magazines put into storage. That stack space will be used to accommodate some teams of Council staff from the Council’s Civic Administration Building which is being assessed further.  As soon as noisy interior works are completed for this temporary change, this quiet reading zone will open again to customers.

In the meantime, current newspapers are available from the First floor, and library staff there are very happy to retrieve books or library items normally located on the Second floor public areas.  Staff are also available to show library members how to access travel, history or NZ eBooks from our Overdrive and Borrowbox collections  or use PressReader (hundreds of current international newspapers) via www.wcl.govt.nz/pressreader.

Bumper book sale starts Tuesday 29 November

Booksalesep16aThousands of avid readers love the Central Library book sales. Judging by their past popularity, this bumper book sale should be no different. Past buyers have used the sale to find the best book deals, to complete their personal collections or just to rummage and find a gem. And the sale helps our libraries by making room for an ever increasing collection. The major highlight of this sale is that unlike the previous non-fiction sale, this sale has a wide variety of fiction (and non-fiction) books, DVDs and CDs for sale.  As at each previous sale, stock is replenished at regular intervals – ensuring there are always fresh bargains to be found.

The book sale this time will be located in the Central Library Mezzanine Room. It opens 9.30am on Tuesday 29 November, ending 4pm on Sunday 4 December.

Booksalesep16s1

Free Film Screenings in August

Syndetics book coverFor August 2016, join us at the Central Library for a ‘laugh in the dark’ with a selection of fantastic comedies each Thursday.

Sessions begin at 6pm on the Ground Floor of the Central Library. These screenings are free to attend. To avoid disappointment reserve your seat by telephoning 801-4068 during library opening hours.

We will now also be hosting family friendly film screenings at Newtown library on the first Friday of each month! Phone (04) 389 2830 to book those, and for more details about the upcoming film, screening on Friday 5th August.

Remember: We have special permission to screen these films for free in public libraries as long as we don’t advertise the film name online (plus other conditions). Please call the information desk (801-4068) to get more details.
Note: reservations not taken up by the starting time at 6pm may be reallocated to customers waiting, as numbers are limited.

Have your say on the future of the Central Library

central-library-night
In 2016, the Central Library building will be 25 years old and it’s time to consider refreshing it. The library landscape is changing rapidly now. We want to ensure that we remain a high performing library for our customers.

Wellington City Council is keen to hear from the community, their ideas, opinions and feedback on refreshing the internal design of the building.

People can provide their feedback by either
a) filling in an online feedback form
b) complete one of the printed feedback forms at any Wellington city library
c) attend one of the following public meetings:
Saturday 28 November 12-2pm,
Wednesday 2 December from 7pm or
Thursday 3 December 12-2pm and from 7pm.

These will all be held at the Mezzanine meeting room, Central Library.

To be included as part of this first feedback phase, please make your comments by 11 December 2015. Thank you. We really appreciate your input into this initial phase to prepare a design brief.

 

central library building

Gamesfest – It’s just become even better!

Every Wednesday it’s Gamesfest at the Central Library. From 5.30pm, on the ground floor, we provide a generous selection of board games that anyone can use.

If you have been coming along, you will be pleased to learn that we’ve just purchased a LOT more games for you to play with. Here are our new additions, all so brand new they’re still sealed!

20150701_144438-1

We already offer chess, Scrabble, Settlers, and many other favourites. With these winter nights, what could be more fun that some friendly competitive rivalry with your friends? All welcome!

 

Spring Poetry Evening on 1 October

spring Celebrate Spring’s arrival with inspirational poetry read in both Chinese and English on 1 October at the Central Library. Come and listen to poets Madeleine Slavick and Rhondda Greig read and share their thoughts on Spring; Diana Bridge’s fine selection of translations of classical Chinese poetry and her own work; and Luo Hui rounding up with bilingual readings and a few pieces of prose. The much-loved modern poems by Xu Zhimo and Gu Cheng will be juxtaposed with classic poems from the Tang dynasty.

There will also be a chance for you to read your poems, please send them to enquiries@wcl.govt.nz before 29 September.

This Chinese-themed poetry reading is jointly organised by the Confucius Institute at Victoria University of Wellington and Wellington City Libraries.

Wednesday 1 October
6:00-7:30pm
Central Library

Chinese-Poetry

 

Plenty of bargains at the May booksale

book sale Every year thousands of avid readers and music lovers gather at Central Library for the May book sale. Judging by its past popularity, this sale should be no different. Past buyers have used the sale to find the best book deals, to complete their personal collections or just to rummage and find a gem. And the sale helps our libraries by making room for an ever increasing collection.

Highlights of this sale: a great range of children’s board books (all at $1), adult fiction books at just 50c each, along with the usual range of non-fiction books, DVDs, CDs and magazines on every topic imaginable. As at each previous sale, stock is replenished at regular intervals ensuring there are always fresh bargains to be found. And they really are bargains – prices start from 50 cents for magazines, adult fiction, and young adult/teens books with most other items between $1 and $6 and some marked prices.

If you love a bargain, you won’t want to miss it. The book sale starts Tuesday 6 May at 9.30am, Central Library.

booksale starts 6 May

Author talk: meet Adrienne Jansen

ada-author-talkOn Thursday 20 March, starting at 6pm at the Central Library, we will have a special celebration for Race Relations Day! Meet Adrienne Jansen and Samson Sahele – these two very different writers will cast their eye on New Zealand’s multicultural society and talk about their own work and about writing together. They will be joined by refugee youth who will read poems from Walking with a Fragile Heart. Well-known musican Sam Manzanza will start this event with his amazing drumming!

I have introduced you to Samson a few days ago, now meet Adrienne!

Adrienne is a writer, editor and teacher. She is a fourth generation New Zealander and lives in Titahi Bay, Porirua. She loves the physical beauty of the area and is a very strong Porirua supporter enjoying its diversity.
Adrienne Jansen writes fiction, non-fiction and poetry. She has lived and worked among immigrants in New Zealand for many years, and her writing draws strongly on that experience. She wrote the text for The Crescent Moon: Asian Face of Islam in New Zealand, with photography by Ans Westra. Her latest novel The Score is about messy lives, shaky pasts and even shakier futures. Adrienne founded the Whitireia Polytechnic Creative Writing Programme, and was its coordinator until 1999. She now teaches fiction and editing on the programme, and has written several of its online courses. She is part of the writing team at Te Papa, New Zealand’s National Museum, and does some freelance work.

But there is so much more!  Have a look here on the Book Council website.

I asked Adrienne about her hobbies and favourite movies and authors. One thing we both enjoy is a love of Moroccan food. I was pleasantly surprised to learn that she has been working with Abdel El Adraoui from the Marrakech Cafe on his new cookbook Abdel’s Favourites from the Marrakech Café. You may remember Adbel from my post on our Communities Stories and Traditions page.

One favourite film of Adrienne is the French comedy The Intouchables. Our library catalogue has this summary: “An irreverent, uplifting comedy about friendship, trust, and human possibility. Based on a true story of friendship between a handicapped millionaire and his street-smart ex-con caretaker, The Intouchables depicts an unlikely camaraderie rooted in honesty and humor between two individuals who, on the surface, would seem to have nothing in common.”

Favourite author: it changes depending on what Adrienne is reading, but she is a great fan of Australian writer Tim Winton. Especially his novel Syndetics book coverCloudstreet :  “[this novel] concerns the everyday lives of two country families who move to the city. ‘It pulses with a sense of wonder and shines with the clear light of truth’ – P Robert Drewe.” (Syndetics summary)

I am very excited about this author talk on Thursday, hope you can make it! A great opportunity to meet very different writers, there will be plenty of opportunity for questions. Remember this is a free event at the Central Library, starting at 6pm.

Amanda Palmer Ninja Gigs at the Library

amandapalmersWellington Central Library was treated to a very special group of visitors on Monday the 2nd of September. Amanda Palmer and her Ninja Parade stopped by the library ground floor for around 15 minutes to perform three songs on her ukelele. The parade, which started on the waterfront piano, weaved through Wellington’s CBD stopping at Te Papa before making its way up Cuba Street and finishing at the Garrett Street Collective. There were many poignant moments during the parade including a renditions of Radiohead’s Creep in the library (see below) and Leonard Cohen’s (made huge by Jeff Buckley) Hallelujah on Cuba Street.

Footage of inside the library is here (courtesy Scoop, also photo above) :

Plenty of bargains at the May book sale!

book sale Every year thousands of avid readers and music lovers gather at Central Library for the May book sale. Judging by its past popularity, this sale should be no different. Past buyers have used the sale to find the best book deals, to complete their personal collections or just to rummage and find a gem. And the sale helps our libraries by making room for an ever increasing collection.

This sale includes more DVDs and music scores than ever before, along with the usual range of books, CDs and magazines on every topic imaginable. Stock is replenished at regular intervals during the sale ensuring there are always fresh bargains to be found. And they really are bargains – prices start from 50 cents for magazines, with most other items between $1 and $6 and some marked prices.

If you love a bargain, you won’t want to miss it. The book sale starts Tuesday 7 May , at 9.30am, Central Library.

booksale starts 6 May

Your Library needs you !

Your library needs youAre you a regular Wellington City Libraries’ user with an Adult membership card? Can you spare one hour next Tuesday or Wednesday evenings?

Then head to the Central Library and give us your opinion about a new service we are keen to offer: library and writing-related items for sale.

We’ll be meeting in the the Library staff room (situated on the top floor of the Central Library) after 5.30pm with the aim to start at 6pm and finish at 7pm. Light refreshments will be offered and freebies will be gifted to participants.

If you are keen, email our team as soon as possible to let us know. A staff member will be waiting to greet you when you arrive. We value your opinion!

So remember:

  • Tuesday the 30th of April
  • Wednesday the 1st of May
  • Central Library staff room
  • 6pm till 7pm
  • refreshments and freebies

See you there!

Catch that fly – author event

Author and illustrator Amy Burrell will be visiting the Preschool Storytime at Wellington Central Library at 10.30am on Friday 17th August. She will be reading aloud her new book Catch That Fly, doing some drawing with children and even has an activity to take home.

Amy will have copies available of her book to collect if parents wish to pre-purchase it.

Come along, listen to some exciting stories with your children on the cushions and they’ll have heaps of fun.

Free Transit of Venus talk tonight

Transit of Venus

Only one week left to go until we will have the last opportunity in our lifetime to see the Transit of Venus on Wednesday 6 June.   Fingers crossed the weather will be clear and sunny again like it is today for a clear view!

In the meantime join us at Central Library tonight (Wednesday 30 May) for a free talk at 7pm by John Harper (Emeritus Professor of Applied Mathematics, Victoria University) who will bring the story of the Transits of Venus to life in a free talk . Professor Harper will discuss not only what transits are and why they happen, but also why they were considered important enough for expeditions to be sent all over the world to observe them, and New Zealand’s role in previous transits.  Don’t miss out on this great talk – there’s no need to book, just come along and join us on the 2nd (top) floor at Central Library, ready for the talk to begin at 7pm. 

And don’t forget that you can join the Wellington Astronomical Society next Wednesday on the City to Sea Bridge (next to Civic Square) from 9.30am – 2.30pm to view the Transit of Venus as it happens (weather permitting).  It’s so important that you don’t ever look at the sun directly as it will damage your eyes irreparably, but you’ll be able to view the transit safely with the Society, using their equipment.   If the weather prevents any viewing outside on Wednesday the Society will be stationed inside the library on the first floor (by the current Transit of Venus display) and we’ll have live feeds streaming from around the world. 

You can also see displays about the Transit of Venus on the 1st and 2nd floors at Central Library at the moment, including items from our Rare Book Collection such as an original copy of Sydney Parkinson’s journal of Captain Cook’s voyage to Tahiti to specifically observe the 1769 transit (before he then further explored the Pacific, including New Zealand).  And check out our Science popular topic page with links to books and good websites with more information about the Transit of Venus too.

transit of venus image

Repainting at Central Library

Starting from today (Monday 28 March), the Central Library’s exterior walls and columns are being repainted – the first time since it opened 20 years ago. Although some work will be done out of hours, to minimise the time taken to complete this project, work will need to continue during the day.

During one stage, scaffolding will be erected along the Victoria Street side for 7 weeks. Parking outside the library on Victoria Street will not be available during this time, but the basement park in Harris Street will remain open throughout.

On Thursday and Friday 7 and 8 April, access to the Central Library will be through the doors to the left hand side into the foyer from 9.30am-12.00 and 1.30pm-8.30pm. This is so that the area above the entrance can be repainted. Access will be as usual through the main central doors from noon to 1:30pm.

Thank you for your patience.

New Rare Book Display

Huia from Walter Buller's "A History of the Birds of New Zealand"
Huia from Walter Buller's "A History of the Birds of New Zealand"

As part of Heritage Month 2010, in association with the Wellington Region Heritage Promotion Council, a new display has been installed in the display case on the 2nd floor of Central.  Looking at the theme of the Environment, highlights include our copy of Sir Walter Buller’s A History of the Birds of New Zealand and Gideon Mantell’s (the “discoverer” of dinosaurs) paper on the exsistence of the Moa in NZ.  So if you’re passing by the 2nd floor, stop by some time to check out this new display.