Sign-up to the online Central Library consultation events

Consultation on the Central Library is moving online under COVID-19 Alert Level 2 with three webinar events for the public – and everyone is welcome. “We’ve had a great response so far with over 300 submissions in the first weeks. But we want to hear from more Wellingtonians about their views on the future of the Central Library service to help inform our decisions in late October,” says Mayor Andy Foster.

“Our Library team has been out with the Planning for Growth Tiny House to answer peoples’ questions and share information about the current building and future options. Unfortunately, we had to move the events planned in our library branches to online webinars while we limit the visitor numbers under Alert Level 2,” he adds.

Libraries portfolio holder Councillor Fleur Fitzsimons says: “We are lucky to have a number of experts from the literacy, learning, arts, community and engineering sectors who will discuss how library spaces, programming and events can play a key role in influencing how people engage and connect with one another and the library’s collections.

“These panel discussions are a great opportunity to discuss how making the space safe for people to be in, and how this creates new possibilities for how communities use the space over the coming decades. A great example of the new opportunities modern libraries can provide people with can be seen in the dynamic Johnsonville Library, and the welcoming Te Awe Library spaces in Brandon Street.”

The three speaker events are:

Who loves our libraries? 6pm – 7pm, Friday 28 August
Come and join in the discussions with speakers from different community or sector areas, on how the Central Library supported people and communities, and the potential opportunities for creating stronger spaces, connections and meaning for everyone.

Speakers: Claire Mabey, Verb Wellington; Ella Flavell, Chair Youth Council; Sandra McCallum, General Manager Changemakers
Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8802363946198864656

Spaces for everyone – 6pm – 7pm, Monday 31 August.
Join in the discussions with library, literature and research experts reimagining how the Central Library building, collections and spaces could reflect the past and create new spaces for everyone.

Speakers: Anne Goulding, Professor of Information Services Management, Victoria University of Wellington; Chris Hay, Manager Tūranga Library & Chair-elect Public Libraries New Zealand; Juliet Blyth, Chief Executive Read NZ
Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6748343184596616462

Why the Central Library closed and restoring the service to Te Ngākau Civic Precinct – 12pm – 1pm, Wednesday 2 September
The Central Library building itself isn’t safe to use. Hear about what closed the building and what is involved in making the building safe again for everyone to use.

Speakers: Tony Holden, Associate, Senior Structural Engineer Aurecon with Peter Brennan, Manager Property, Wellington City Council
Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6520247298401358608
As well as continuing to visit the CBD and suburbs with the Planning for Growth team information kiosk over the coming weeks, we will also provide some online drop-in sessions where you can ask questions of the project team.

For the latest list of events please go to: https://www.letstalk.wellington.govt.nz/central-library/widgets/302558/key_dates#132595

How to have your say on the future Central Library service: Complete an online submission form at https://www.letstalk.wellington.govt.nz/central-library/

You can also download a copy of the Statement of Proposal and a printed submission form under the ‘Document library’ on the right-hand side of the website. Or you can pick up printed copies from your nearest library branch.

You can provide your views on five options proposed in the Statement of Proposal, or provide your own idea, or say if you prefer an option which was not put forward.
Submissions close at 5pm, Monday 7 September 2020.

Share your views on the future of the Central Library

Monday 27 July marks the start of a six-week public consultation to gather Wellingtonians’ views on restoring the Central Library service in the heart of the city.

“We know how frustrating the closure of the Central Library building is, which is why we sped up the decision-making as quickly as the Local Government Act allowed us to,” says Mayor Andy Foster.

“We are looking forward to hearing Wellingtonians views and we also want to bring life back to Te Ngākau Civic Precinct.”“The building itself is deemed unsafe for people to be in, and there are several ways to remedy this, which also creates new possibilities in how we create the space to meet the changing needs of our growing modern city.”

“The Central Library has been treasured by generations of Wellingtonians as a special place in the heart of our city,” said Libraries Portfolio holder Councillor Fleur Fitzsimons.
“I encourage all Wellingtonians, young and old to have a say about the future of the Library. We need to hear your questions, your views and your aspirations for our Central Library so we can make a good decision that will be well supported by residents.”

“The Statement of Proposal outlines five options for retaining a Central Library service in Te Ngākau Civic Precinct,” says Councillor Iona Pannett, Portfolio Leader for Resilient Buildings. “Three remediate the existing building to a low, mid, or high level and two more suggest building a new library on either the existing site or another site within Te Ngākau Civic Precinct.”

“It also discusses other options which have been discarded, as they were not practicable. We are keen to understand what options you prefer, and the factors behind your decision, or whether you prefer another option.”

Sign up at https://www.letstalk.wellington.govt.nz/central-library to stay-up-to-date with the latest news, find out when events are happening near you and read the Statement of Proposal on the Future of Central Library Consultation. Paper copies of both documents will be available at all library branches from Monday 27 July.

Everyone is invited to complete a submission form between Monday 27 July and 5pm, Monday 7 September. The public are also welcome to make their submission in person to the Strategy and Policy Committee on Wednesday 22 September. To do this, select this option in your submission form.

Te Awe Library to open Tuesday 14 July

Wellington City Council is pleased to announce the third and largest interim library in the CBD, Te Awe Library (meaning White Feathers), will open to the public from 9.30am, Tuesday 14 July.

“We are delighted to announce we are opening Te Awe Library with a dawn ceremony this coming Tuesday,” says Mayor Andy Foster. “Te Awe Library is the largest of the three, interim CBD libraries we designed for people to use while decisions on the Central Library service are made, and subsequent physical works undertaken.

“Everyone will find something to enjoy in our new oasis in the city among the more than 20,000 items including fiction and non-fiction books, magazines, CD and vinyl, as well as the many popular events and programmes our libraries are known for. It will also bring additional life to this part of the Golden Mile.”

Community Well-Being portfolio lead Councillor Fleur Fitzsimons says Te Awe Library is going to be great for children and young people.

“There is a large space, dedicated for them to read, play, and take part in popular programmes and events like Baby Rock and Rhyme, Storytimes, and Lego Sundays. Baby Rock and Rhyme is a Wellington institution loved by babies and parents alike. I know families have been really missing it, many will breathe a sigh of relief with its return to the central city,” says Councillor Fitzsimons.

The team of specialist librarians have carefully selected the more than 20,000 items in the collection to reflect the interests of customers and added new or related themes to help further exploration, says Laurinda Thomas, Libraries and Community Spaces Manager.

“People will find plenty of seating and quiet zones to study, read, or for groups to gather and chill. There are also spaces and meeting rooms where we’ll run a range of events for everyone, such as movie nights.

“Music lovers and aficionados will enjoy a strong CD and vinyl collection, including many hard to find or stream albums, plus most of New Zealand’s Flying Nun releases. Our music specialists have highlighted seminal or must-hear albums from around the world using new, blue ‘Essential listening’ stickers.

“We all know how important good coffee is for Wellingtonians, so we’re also excited to have Corey and the Collective Café team as neighbours, which will open beside the library on Wednesday 15 July. Everyone will be able to enjoy a hot drink, including Peoples’ coffee, or choose something tasty from their range of organic, free-range food while reading a magazine or finding the latest books.”

After the opening ceremony, Te Awe Library will welcome the public from 9.30am, Tuesday 14 July. This branch’s normal opening hours will run from 8am – 8pm, Monday to Friday and 9.30am – 5pm on Saturday and Sunday.

We will swap the central city weekend hours from Arapaki Manners Library to our larger Te Awe Library. So from Monday 13 July, Arapaki Manners Library will be open between 8am – 7pm, Monday to Friday and closed on weekends.

Te Awe Library can be accessed via either 29 Brandon Street or Panama Street next to the Collective Café.

There are return slots at both entrances, and the one in Panama Street is open after-hours.

Map of our 3 CBD Branch locations

Central Library’s collection is on the move

The Central Library collection is getting ready for its new home in the Johnsonville Collection and Distribution Centre.  A mix of approximately 400,000 books, CDs, DVDs, magazines, newspapers and other reference materials will be carefully packed in order, moved and re-shelved over the coming eight weeks.

“We are pleased to be in the final stages of making the much-loved collection available once again, and we thank our customers for their ongoing support,” says Laurinda Thomas, Wellington City Libraries and Community Spaces Manager.

“The Centre in Johnsonville provides both the climatic conditions, space and transport routes needed to manage the collection safely over the long term, until decisions can be made about the future central library services.”

“Although we move thousands of items around our 14 branches every day, this will jump substantially when people are able to order from the CDC. So we are finalising the ordering process and timings so people know what to expect. Towards late April we will advise customers how to order items, and the timings for when they can pick them up from the branch of their choice.”

Over 12,500 items are available in two of the three planned CBD libraries, which opened in May and October last year. Arapaki Library in Manners Street provides a mix of fiction, non-fiction and popular children’s titles. He Mataphi Library within the National Library has over 5,000 items with an Aotearoa and Māori focus.

The third and largest of the three CBD libraries, Te Awe will open in May. Te Awe will provide spaces where people can read, study or collaborate. There is also a dedicated space for a children’s collection, parents’ room and the popular Baby Rock ‘n’ Rhyme sessions.

People will be able to access around 31,000 items which have been tailored to represent the diverse range of subjects which Central Library customers have requested or reserved.

Council staff will be providing advice to the Council on Wednesday 25 March on options for future central library services and the external engineering assessments on the Central Library building. We will share the papers on the Wellington City Council website on 19 March.

Wellington City Libraries’ rare book collection is now housed at the Wellington City Archives at 28 Barker Street.

More information:
Timeline for Wellington Central Library Replacement Services

 

Naming of our newest CBD library caps off busy year for library services

CBD 3

Wellington’s third CBD library has been gifted the name Te Awe (meaning white feathers or plumes) which caps off an eventful but productive year for the city’s library service, says Mayor Andy Foster.

The Mayor says 2019 was extremely busy for staff with the closure of the Central Library building, the opening of two new central city libraries and the Johnsonville Library at Waitohi, and the design and planning of Te Awe Library in Brandon Street. The new collection and distribution centre, which has been named Te Pātaka – a storehouse, is also under construction in Johnsonville and will house the Central Library’s collection of over 400,000 items.

“I’m proud of the many major milestones we have achieved in only nine months since the Central Library closure in March. As well as opening three new libraries, staff have delivered the popular ComicFest and Beyond the Page events, held the Kanopy Film Festival and expanded the digital collections that members can access.

“A new artwork and hoarding has been installed around the Central Library as we begin to look at options for the future of central city library services. This is part of Council’s Te Ngākau programme where staff are considering the future development of the Civic Precinct as a whole, including the Central Library building.” Council staff will be reporting to the Mayor and Councillors on this in March 2020.

“We know that libraries play a key role in the social infrastructure of our communities. They’re crucial to our city both in terms of providing access to a range of collections and programmes which inform, entertain and educate, but also in providing our communities a place to meet, talk and grow.”

Community facilities portfolio leader Councillor Fleur Fitzsimons says Te Awe Library is planned to open by May, which will give contractors time to fit out the space.

“We’re working closely with our architects to ensure the design makes best use of the space available and is fit for purpose as the largest new CBD library. The building has undergone significant structural strengthening and the new library space is currently a blank canvas so the fit out will take some months to complete.”

Councillor Fitzsimons says work on Te Pātaka is also well underway and staff expect to begin relocating items in the Central Library collection as soon as February 2020. Items may become available to library members to request as early as April 2020 by which time most items will have been relocated.

More information:
Central city library services FAQs
Timeline for Wellington Central Library Replacement Services

He Matapihi Molesworth Library now open

Wellingtonians have today gained a second central city library service, this time with a focus on Aotearoa, with the opening of a new cooperative space in the National Library.

He Matapihi Molesworth Library was opened today with a small Whakatau before the library officially opened to the public.

Wellington Mayor Justin Lester says, “It’s a pleasure to add this welcoming new space to our CBD library network. Wellingtonians now have access to over 5000 items in our Aotearoa and Māori collection in one special location. We’re very thankful for the support we’ve received from everyone as we’ve been developing our replacement library services following the closure of the Central Library.”

He says the Council’s first replacement library service, Arapaki Manners Library which opened in May, continues to receive positive feedback from visitors. “I hope He Matapihi Molesworth will be just as well-received, and we are also looking forward to the opening of our third CBD library in the Harbour City Centre early next year, and to getting our new collection and distribution centre up and running in Johnsonville.”

National Librarian Bill Macnaught says the library opening marks the first milestone in a successful ongoing partnership between the National Library and the Council which allows people to access the knowledge held in both collections. “The new library is next to our popular He Tohu exhibition and provides a shared space that school groups and other visitors will be able to use.”

Community facilities portfolio leader Councillor Fleur Fitzsimons says staff have carefully hand-picked the new library’s Aotearoa collection to make sure a mix of items are available which reflect the depth of material on New Zealand society and culture. “We’re also happy to include a dedicated children’s section.”

Items can be borrowed or browsed and include topics such as Māori and Māori local history, NZ fiction, biography, books in te reo, art and architecture, natural history, general history and social comment. The library also offers magazines, access to digital content, free WiFi, public PCs, printing and seating. Library staff are on hand to answer questions and join up new members. Hours are 9am to 5pm Monday to Friday, and 9am to 1pm Saturday. Further library information can be found via the Visit He Matapihi Molesworth Library branchpage.

Wellington to have a third new central city library

CBD 3

Wellington is to have a third new central city library, this time in the Harbour City Centre on Brandon Street. Wellington Mayor Justin Lester says the Council has finalised a partnership with building owners Cornerstone Partners making the central location possible. He says the Council expects the new library to open early next year. He says the library will be the largest of the Council’s three CBD branches to be developed at around 1400 square metres across a ground and a mezzanine level. A privately operated café will operate on the ground floor next to the library.

The Mayor says that careful planning is underway to make best use of the space for study, relaxation and access to collections and services. “This fantastic location has given the Council an opportunity to develop another fresh and innovative space for Wellingtonians to learn, relax and be inspired.”

Community facilities portfolio leader Councillor Fleur Fitzsimons says the planned Brandon Street library will complete the new CBD library network, along with Arapaki Manners Library, and He Matapihi Molesworth Library which is due to open in October.

Councillor Fitzsimons says she’s delighted that the new library will focus on children and families, with a dedicated space for a children’s collection, parents’ room and the very popular Baby Rock ‘n’ Rhyme sessions. “We’re looking forward to bringing programming for children and families back into the central city as the space will give us the ability to hold regular and one-off events.” She says the new library’s wide-ranging collection will have around 20,000 items, almost tripling the number of items on offer to members in the CBD library network.

New Collection and Distribution Centre
The Council has also found a home for Wellington Central Library’s collection of 400,000 items in Johnsonville. The Mayor says the Council is leasing a 2000 square metre, two storey site at 141 Johnsonville Road and will begin development on a new collection and distribution centre.

He says finding the right site marks a key milestone to making items in the Central Library collection accessible once more following the closure of the Central Library building earlier this year. It will give Wellington City Libraries Te Matapihi Ki Te Ao Nui a new centre to manage the entire network’s collection, as the Central Library previously provided this function.

“We’re extremely pleased with this location. It’s been a challenge to locate a safe and suitable space in Wellington which is large enough and ticks all the boxes. This site has excellent access to major transport routes and the building is structurally strong enough to house the collection, with the correct climatic conditions.”

The Council will use the present Johnsonville Library building as an interim extra warehouse facility, once the new Waitohi Library opens in December. The Mayor says more decisions have yet to be made around the new operating model, “but we’re happy to be in a position to now move ahead.”

Work to get the site ready is expected to take several months and items will be available to library members to request after the collection has been relocated.

Before then, Wellingtonians will see over 30,000 items across the CBD library network become available in the next few months: Arapaki Manners Library has a collection of 8,000 accessible items; He Matapihi Molesworth Library, due to open in October, will add around 5,000 items; and the new Brandon Street library will add another 20,000 items when it opens. Wellington’s 11 branch libraries presently hold around 250,000 items which library members can access.

Further information on the new Brandon Street library

  • Once completed, the new library is expected to be open Monday to Friday 8am to 8pm, Saturday and Sunday 9.30am to 5pm and have a 24/7 book returns facility.
  • Items in the collection will include fiction, non-fiction, audio-visual and world languages collections.
  • The new library will have dedicated zones with a variety of seating and spaces for quiet or collaborative work.
  • Popular programmes like Baby Rock ‘n’ Rhyme and pre-school storytimes are planned to be offered along with other events which could include book clubs and author talks, free movie screenings, creative projects and activities.
  • Customers will have access to the library catalogue and website, and a full range of self service options with staff on hand to help.
  • Public computers, printing and photocopying facilities will be available with free Wi-Fi.

New Wellington library space named

The new central city library service being developed in the National Library has been given the name He Matapihi Molesworth Library.

The announcement brings Wellingtonians a step closer to enjoying the new cooperative space on the ground floor of the National Library, which is expected to open later this year. The space is being developed in partnership with Wellington City Council.

He Matapihi means ‘a window’, and the name was put forward by Mana Whenua.

National Librarian Bill Macnaught says the name is well-suited for the space. “A window has a view and a connection between spaces. The name highlights the important relationships between He Matapihi Molesworth’s Aotearoa collection, a new shared area, and the National Library’s He Tohu exhibition and collections. People need to continue to have access to the knowledge that both our libraries contain. School visits to He Tohu will be among those to benefit from the new shared space.”

Wellington Mayor Justin Lester says it’s been a great opportunity to work in partnership with the National Library on the development. He says the new space will complement National Library’s collections and gives Wellingtonians access to the new library’s Aotearoa and Māori collection of over 5000 books. “He Matapihi Molesworth will be a welcome addition to Arapaki Manners Library and Service Centre which opened earlier this year, and will also give library users another service at the other end of the central city area.”

The new library’s collection, which can be borrowed by members, will range over topics such as Māori and Māori local history, NZ fiction, biography, books in Te Reo, art and architecture, natural history, and general history and social comment. It also offers a children’s section, magazines, access to digital content, free WiFi, public PCs, printing and seating spaces.

Dedicated staff from Wellington City Libraries will provide the new service, answer questions and join up new members.

 

An introduction to CBD Arapaki Manners

Arapaki Manners Library is now in its third week! It’s been great to see plenty of familiar faces, and to sign up many new patrons. In case you haven’t been in yet, here’s a rundown of the core parts of our collection.

Adult fiction
Our shelves are packed with the best new fiction and a range of brilliant titles that will keep you turning pages throughout the day and all through the night.

Adult non-fiction
We have a diverse array of travel books, poetry, cook books, science, history, economics, politics, self-help, health, and computer guides! Fuel your passion, engage your curiosity and learn from some of the greatest minds.

Magazines
Arapaki holds a range of the most popular magazines covering topics from aviation to photography to home décor.

Film and television on DVD
We have hundreds of the latest and greatest DVDs of all genres for your perusal.


Music CDs
Plenty of popular and recent releases from around the globe, as well as some of the best new music from Wellington and Aotearoa await you.

Māori Collection
Located within the non-fiction collection, we have a section of titles exploring Te Ao Maori. The collection offers a great opportunity to learn about Māori art and culture and the history of Aotearoa.

Audiobooks on CD
Popular authors include David Baldacci and Camilla Läckberg amongst others!

Adult graphic novels
Keep up-to-date with the latest titles, or cast your eyes over the modern classics we have at Arapaki.

Newspapers
Arapaki holds the current issue only of the Dominion Post, the New Zealand Herald the Sydney Morning Herald and the Guardian.

Young adult fiction and comics
Riveting reads lurk amongst the YA shelves. Find tales of adventure, struggle and self-discovery.

Children’s content
We have a bounty of gorgeous picture books, eager to read learner’s books, junior comics, audiobooks, fiction and some remarkable non-fiction titles! There’s plenty here for kids to browse.

Arapaki Manners Library is open:

  • Monday–Friday, 8am–7pm
  • Saturday and Sunday, 9:30am– 5pm

Nau mai, haere mai. Come in today, and look out for more blogs highlighting interesting and quirky parts of our collection!

New co-operative space to open at National Library

A partnership between the National Library and Wellington City Council to develop library services was announced today by Internal Affairs Minister Tracey Martin.

The Minister says since Wellington’s Central Library was closed, the National Library has been working with the Council to look at creative ways to deliver complementary services.

“Both share the goal of making sure people have access to knowledge. It’s great there’s going to be a new co-operative space, where some of Wellington’s Central Library services and collection can complement National Library’s open access research collections,” says Minister Martin.

National Librarian Bill Macnaught says the new space will be adjacent to the popular He Tohu exhibition. “National Library school group visitors will be able to use the new ‘bleachers’ mini theatre area for visits to He Tohu.

Wellington Mayor, Justin Lester, says Wellingtonians are missing the Central Library and this is one way this special collaboration can enhance library services to customers. “We’re really excited to work together with the National Library for the benefit of Wellingtonians and all New Zealanders. The partnership with the National Library will form a part of the Capital’s replacement library services network,” says Justin Lester.

The new co-operative space is expected to be open in September offering customers a small collection of books and magazines to browse and borrow, access to digital content, free WiFi, and public PCs. A librarian will be on hand to answer questions and join up new members.

Questions and answers for the National Library & WCC Partnership

When will the partnership space open?
It will take some time to fit out and set up the space, but we aim to have it open in September.

How long will the partnership space be open?
This depends on the Council’s eventual decision about the future of the Central Library building and the National Library’s future use plans for the site. It could be several years before we have a Central Library again.  Our initial partnership agreement is until the end of 2021, at which time both parties will review and agree any changes.

What can I borrow from this library?
We expect around 7,000 items will be available to browse and borrow. Items will have a New Zealand focus and complement the National Library’s existing collection.

What else can I do there?
Get access to digital content, free WiFi, and public PCs with scanning and printing facilities. A librarian will be on hand to answer questions and join up new members.

How many library staff will work there?
Up to 5 Wellington City Libraries’ staff will be based at the partnership space.

When will other pop-up libraries open?
Arapaki Manners Library and Service Centre is set to open on Tuesday 28 May.  Details about other library sites in the CBD network will be available in the coming weeks.

What’s happening with the Central Library building?
At this stage we are awaiting further engineering advice on what the options are for addressing the structural issues with the building.  It is likely there will be a range of options for how we approach this and we don’t know yet if this will include any kind of upgrading or redevelopment beyond the required remedial work.