Muslim Migrant Experiences – Event at Newtown!

Copies of NANSEN magazine

NANSEN magazine online

Haere mai, Salaam and Soo dhawoow! Join us at Te Puna Waiora Newtown Library on February 7th, 5pm for the launch of international migration magazine, NANSEN!

Hear from journalist Muzhgan Samarqandi and editor Ronia Ibrahim about their experiences as Muslim migrants in Aotearoa and what “home” means to them. If you can, please bring a dish to share that tastes like home.

Details:

Te Puna Waiora | Newtown Library
Wednesday 7 February
5pm-8pm
Musim Migrant Experiences Facebook event

NANSEN. Issue 03 | Muzhgan Samarqandi: The Reed Flute’s Friend

NANSEN Magazine aims to connect and celebrate migrants of all kinds. We do this by getting to know one migrant per issue, homing in on the minutiae of lives lived away from ‘home’ – moments that all migrants can relate to. Issue 03 focuses on New Zealand. In this issue we eat Qabuli Pulao from Muzhgan Samarqandi’s upcoming cookbook, meet Bangladeshi-born hip-hop artist ABRZY, explore an Indigenous approach to immigration policy and offer our suggestions for building the migrant utopia we all want, plus much more!”
(Adapted from NANSEN website)

About the speakers:

Muzhgan Samarqandi is a former broadcaster from Baghlan, northern Afghanistan. She now lives in Wellington with her Kiwi husband, son and baby daughter, working as a cross-culutral advisor and interpreter. She is Afghanistani by nationality, Tajik by ethnicity and Persian by native-tongue.

Ronia Ibrahim is a writer, artist and designer. Her work focuses on sharing stories of migrant experiences and transformation. She recently completed her studies in Communication Design, English Literature and Creative Writing at Victoria University of Wellington. Originally hailing from Wellington, she now resides in Melbourne, Australia.

Vanessa Ellingham (host) is the publisher and editor of NANSEN Magazine. She writes on migration, community and belonging. Born in Aotearoa New Zealand, her iwi affiliations are Te Ātiawa, Taranaki and Ngāruahine. She lives and works in Berlin.

The Reed Flute's Friend, by Muzhgan Samarqandi
The Reed Flute’s Friend, by Muzhgan Samarqandi
Migration route, starting with ancestors 800 years ago
Migration route, starting with ancestors 800 years ago

‘Stories of Dementia’: Special event at Karori Library

Silhouette of a person, with flowers radiating out of their head

As part of Te Wiki Kaumātua Seniors’ Week we’re hosting a special talk at Karori Library, Stories of Dementia. Join us on Saturday 7th October, 2-3pm as we’re joined by authors Kristen Phillips, Charity Norman, Pip Desmond and Anne Schumacher of Dementia Wellington. This talk is for anyone interested in learning more about dementia, dementia experiences and what steps to take if yourself or a loved one are affected.

Here we highlight the work of the speakers, all of whom have personal and/or professional experiences dealing with the differing journeys dementia can take, and the effects it has on carers and whānau.

Continue reading “‘Stories of Dementia’: Special event at Karori Library”

Wellington Writers Walk: Dame Fiona Kidman

Dame Fiona Kidman

In the lead up to our Wellington Writers Walk 21st Anniversary Event at Karori Library this Saturday we’ve taken a closer look at Dame Fiona Kidman’s typographical sculpture, which features a quote taken from ‘Speaking with my Grandmothers’ in Writing Wellington, ed. Roger Robinson, Victoria University Press, 1999.

This town of ours kind of flattened
across the creases
of an imaginary map
a touch of parchment surrealism here
no wonder the lights
are wavering
all over the place
tonight
not a straight town at all.

In the video below, local authors and Wellington Writers Walk Committee members Philippa Werry and Maggie Rainey-Smith explain Kidman’s work, embedded in the sand at Freyberg Beach. They provide a fascinating insight into the pride Kidman feels about her sculpture, which celebrates her ancestry and deep connection to Wellington.

Join us at Karori Library on Saturday 13th May, 11am for a special event celebrating the 21st anniversary of the Wellington Writers Walk, featuring renowned authors Elizabeth Knox and Dame Fiona Kidman in discussion with fellow author and Writers Walk committee member Tanya Ashcroft. Together they will talk about the creation, history and future of this wonderful Wellington institution, and the part they’ve played in making the walk the much-loved success it is.

Please note we expect this event to be very popular and seating will be on a first come first served basis. A New Zealand Sign Language Interpreter will be present at this event.

Explore some of Dame Fiona Kidman’s books in our collection:


So far, for now : on journeys, widowhood and stories that are never over / Kidman, Fiona
“Evocative, wry and thought-provoking, this is a rewarding journey with one of our finest writers. It is a little over a decade since Fiona Kidman wrote her last volume of memoir. But her story did not end on its last page; instead her life since has been busier than ever, filled with significant changes, new writing and fascinating journeys. From being a grandmother to becoming a widow, from the suitcase-existence of book festivals to researching the lives and deaths of Jean Batten and Albert Black, she has found herself in new territory and viewed the familiar with fresh eyes. She takes us with her to Paris and Pike River, to Banff, Belfast and Bangkok, searching for houses in Hanoi and Hawera, reliving her past in Waipu and experiencing a stint in Otago. These locations and experiences – among others – have shaped Fiona’s recent years, and in this lively book she shares the insights she has picked up along the way.” (Catalogue)

All the way to summer : stories of love and longing / Kidman, Fiona
“Fiona Kidman’s early stories about New Zealand women’s experiences scandalised readers with their vivid depictions of the heartbreaks and joys of desire, illicit liaisons and unconventional love. Her writing made her a feminist icon in the early 1980s, and she has since continued to tell the realities of women’s lives, her books resonating with many readers over the years and across the world. To mark her 80th birthday, this volume brings together a variety of her previously published stories as well as several that are new or previously uncollected; all moving, insightful and written with love. The final stories trace her own history of love, a memoir of significant people from childhood and beyond.” (Catalogue)

This change in the light : a collection of poems / Kidman, Fiona
“Fiona Kidman’s exquisite and adroit poetry invites the reader into her life, introducing us to her family, friends and places she has loved. In turn it touches our own experiences, offering universal relevance and insight.” (Catalogue)

True stars / Kidman, Fiona
“Who is trying to scare Rose? This gripping novel is a vivid portrayal of New Zealand in the 1980s.Rose Kendall is alone. She is isolated from her children, her friends, and her political ideals, and there is someone trying to scare her – she doesn’t know why and she doesn’t know who.True Stars shows the tensions and divisions in 1980s New Zealand, which were echoed both on a national level and in family relationships, which were crystallised by the 1981 Springbok Tour, and which gnaw at differences in race, gender, class – and politics. It is a savage and often humorous novel set during the last months of the Lange Government. ‘With True Stars, Fiona Kidman has become the foremost chronicler of our times.’ – Roger Hall, The Dominion” (Catalogue)

Beside the dark pool / Kidman, Fiona
“In this sequel to At the End of Darwin Road, Fiona Kidman takes us through the writing of over twenty more books, of her involvement in New Zealand’s literary circles, her championing of writing and writers and the significant people she has met along the way.” (Catalogue)

Ricochet baby / Kidman, Fiona
“A moving novel, with intelligent and compassionate insight into post-natal depression and the complexities of relationships. ‘When Roberta falls pregnant her whole family is filled with joy.’ Fallen is not exactly how Roberta would describe it, for she and Paul have planned the baby and it has been conceived at exactly the time that they chose. But the birth itself is not as anyone chooses and the circles that radiate from this crisis affect everyone involved and change Roberta’s life, in particular, for ever. Moving and perceptive, full of intelligence and compassionate insights into the complexities of human relationships, this is a fine novel from one of New Zealand’s best writers. ‘In her craft of her storytelling and in her compassionate gutsy tough expression of female experience, she is the best we have.’ – NZ Listener” (Catalogue)

The book of secrets / Kidman, Fiona
“The true story of three women who lived in a community under the harsh leadership of Norman McLeod. The community had followed him from Scotland in 1817 to found a settlement in Nova Scotia and then moved on to New Zealand. Anyone who ran counter to McLeod was forced to live a life of secrets.” (Catalogue)

Where your left hand rests : a collection of poems / Kidman, Fiona
“‘This book is a treasure, in all senses of the word.’ – Nelson Mail An outstanding poetry collection by one of New Zealand’s leading writers. This collection of poems from Fiona Kidman bear all the hallmarks of her writing- acute observation, a telling eye for detail, a wry humour and great empathy. By turns tender, passionate, elegiac and amusing, the poems range over wide territory, from imagining her Scottish grandmother’s arrival in New Zealand, to wearing Katherine Mansfield’s shawl, to time spent in Greece and in her garden. “Superb poetry. A truly lovely little book.” – Metro” (Catalogue)

The infinite air / Kidman, Fiona
“Jean Batten became an international icon in the 1930s. A brave, beautiful woman, she made a number of heroic solo flights across the world. The newspapers couldn’t get enough of her; and yet she suddenly slipped out of view, disappearing to the Caribbean with her mother and dying in obscurity in Majorca, buried in a pauper’s grave.” (Catalogue)

The captive wife / Kidman, Fiona
“A prize-winning historical novel that has become a New Zealand classic. Based on real events, this prize-winning novel is the compelling story of a marriage, of love and duty, and the quest for freedom in a pioneering age. When Betty Guard steps ashore in Sydney, in 1834, she meets with a heroine’s welcome. Her survival during a four-month kidnapping ordeal amongst Taranaki Maori is hailed as nothing short of a miracle. But questions about what really happened slowly surface within the elite governing circles of the raw new town of Sydney. Jacky Guard, ex-convict turned whaler, had taken Betty as his wife to his New Zealand whaling station when she was fourteen. After several years and two children, the family is returning from a visit to Sydney when their barque is wrecked near Mount Taranaki. A battle with local Maori follows, and Betty and her children are captured. Her husband goes to seek a ransom, but instead England engages in its first armed conflict with New Zealand Maori when he is persuaded to return with two naval ships. After her violent rescue, Betty’s life amongst the tribe comes under intense scrutiny.” (Catalogue)

‘Wild Weather’ Author Talk at Johnsonville this Thursday

Author photo of Lisa Murray, linked to Facebook event

Join us at Waitohi Johnsonville Library on Thursday November 3rd, 5:30pm for a talk with meteorologist Lisa Murray of MetService NZ, co-author of the new book New Zealand’s Wild Weather.

Cyclones, heatwaves, snow and drought… as a long, narrow group of islands Aotearoa New Zealand has always found itself at the mercy of wild weather, and that’s before accounting for the mounting impacts of climate change.

Come hear meteorologist Lisa Murray of MetService NZ present an invigorating hour, delving into the fascinating facts behind some of this country’s most dramatic weather.

What: ‘Wild Weather’ talk with Lisa Murray
When: Thursday 3 November, 5:30pm
Where: Waitohi Johnsonville Library

Event on Facebook

About Lisa

Meteorologist Lisa Murray is MetService NZ’s Head of Weather Communication. Lisa specialises in science communication and education, to ensure people’s safety during severe weather events. She recently enjoyed success as a speaker at the Auckland Writers Festival.

New Zealand’s wild weather
“This book explores the drama of New Zealand’s changeable weather, explained by a range of MetService experts. A compelling, informative and highly illustrated series of investigations into the different types of weather events that occur in New Zealand. MetService has compiled the scientific expertise, insight and weather data across New Zealand and the globe, to communicate the intricacies of our extreme weather events.New Zealand’s Wild Weather weaves meteorology with dramatic stories of everyday people impacted by the country’s mercurial climate.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Join us for a Talk with Emily Writes

With the new release of  Is it Bed Time Yet? a hilarious and moving collection of writings about being a parent in Aotearoa by Emily Writes and friends, we invite you to come along to the Central Library for a very special author talk!

Come along and have a laugh, share some stories and meet the author herself, Emily Writes. Emily will share a reading from her new book, some stories and answer all of those burning questions, and there might even be a special guest or two!

When and where?

This event will be held at 10:30 am at the Wellington Central Library on Wednesday August 22nd.

Our Baby Rock & Rhyme session with finger dancing and stories runs from 9:30-10:00am in the children’s area, so come along for some fun for the little ones first, then head over to the Young Adults area on the ground floor nearby for some fun for yourself.

You can borrow a copy from us or Unity Books will be available during the event to sell copies of Is it Bed Time Yet? and you may even be able to get your copy signed!

About Emily Writes?

Wellington local Emily Writes is a best-selling author, writer, activist, volunteer and a mother of two. Emily has published two books Rants in the Dark: One Tired Mama to Another and Is it Bedtime Yet? with Penguin RandomHouse. She has been the parenting columnist for the New Zealand Herald and the New Zealand Woman’s Weekly and has also written for Metro magazine. She is currently editor of The Spinoff Parents and a panelist on The Parenting Hour on Newstalk ZB. Emily founded and runs a not-for-profit/volunteer-run charity called Ballet is for Everyone, which provides free ballet lessons for children from low-income homes and children with disabilities and high health needs. She is an advocate for children’s and women’s rights, speaker for The Neonatal Trust and Perinatal Depression and Awareness Aotearoa.

Borrow Emily’s books:

Is it bedtime yet? / Writes, Emily
“The experience of parenthood is different for everyone. And every day can be different too. Read a hilarious and moving collection of perspectives from the well-loved Emily Writes and her friends. Some of them are experienced writers, others have put pen to paper for the first time. If it takes a village to raise a child, then this writing comes from the whole village. Yet every experience is a real one, and you will feel the joy, the horror, the love and the heart-ache as you read about birthday parties, vasectomies, hugs, hospitals and, of course, sleepless nights.” (Catalogue)

Rants in the dark : from one tired mama to another / Writes, Emily
“Popular blogger Emily Writes gives words of encouragement to sleep-deprived parents everywhere. With two small boys, both non-sleepers, Emily finds herself awake in the wee small hours night after night. Her writing is often done then, and she offers her own often hilarious and always heart-warming experiences to other exhausted parents. She describes the frustrations as well as the tender moments of real parenting, as opposed to what you thought it was going to be like, or what well-meaning advice-givers tell you it should be like. A must-have for all new parents and parents-to-be. Emily’s blogs have been wildly popular, as have her on-line columns with New Zealand Woman’s Weekly and The New Zealand Herald.” (Catalogue)

Learn more about publishing your masterpiece at Central Library on Friday 9th Dec

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UPDATE: We are happy to announce that we will now be hosting this event at Central Library on FRIDAY 9th DECEMBER at 1PM. Thank you for your patience!

For all of us who are curious about the process of writing and want to know more about what comes next for writers and sometimes takes many years before we can find those labours of love on our library shelves, we have invited author and 2017 Burns Fellow Craig Cliff together with Mākaro Press publisher and author Mary McCallum to join us at the Central Library. They will be discussing how the editing and publishing process works drawing on their own experiences.

indexindexCraig Cliff, author of A Man Melting: Short stories and The Mannequin Makers will be the Robert Burns Fellow at Otago University in 2017. He hopes to be as prolific as he was in 2008, when he set himself the goal of writing a million words in a year (and blogged about it at www.yearofamillionwords.blogspot.com). He only wrote 800,767 words in the end, some of which can be found in his short story collection, A Man Melting, which won Best First Book in the 2011 Commonwealth Writer’s Prize. His novel, The Mannequin Makers (2013), has been translated into Romanian and will come out in the U.S. next year.

index3index2Mary McCallum is an author turned publisher. She started up Mākaro Press in Wellington over three years ago and has already published 50 titles, mainly poetry and fiction, and some non-fiction including memoirs. Six titles have already been shortlisted for major awards. Mary is also the author of the award-winning, The Blue (Penguin 2007), a children’s novel Dappled Annie and the Tigrish (Gecko 2014) and a chapbook of poetry The Tenderness of Light. Mary has reviewed books on National Radio for nearly 15 years, and has worked as a bookseller, creative writing tutor, broadcast journalist and TV presenter.

index4Eastbourne: 100 years was published in 2006 and includes one of McCallum’s essays.

 

 

 

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