The full Central Library CD collection is now available to borrow!

It has been a huge job to relocate all our Central Library collections to a new home at Te Pātaka, our new collection and Distribution Centre located in Johnsonville. However we are very happy to announce that the Central Library CD collection is available to be borrowed again in its entirety. Items can be reserved via our online catalogues from Te Pātaka to be collected from any of our other Branch Libraries.
We have decided to remove any fees for reserving items from Te Pātaka. However we have introduced a $2 charge per item if people do not pick up their reserved items within 7 working days of being notified they are available for pick up. This is to help keep the items in the collection circulating for everyone to access.

We have also curated a core collection of ‘Essential Listening’ titles from our large Central AV collection, many of which are unavailable on streaming services in New Zealand. All our ‘Essential Listening’ titles are taken from 1001 albums you must hear before you die & Nick Bollinger’s 100 essential New Zealand albums. They are also tagged on our catalogue. Just type in Essential Listening as a search and you can check them out from home, your device, or on our online catalogues in the library.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here are some pictures of just some of the CD shelves out at Te Pātaka to give you an idea of the scope of what’s available. We will be posting some videos of us amongst the collection soon, as we start to highlight some genres and titles for you!

Staff Picks CDs & DVDs

Staff Picks are back, with a completely random selection of new & old material that Library Staff have been watching & viewing recently!


Punisher. / Bridgers, Phoebe
When I reminisce about the apocalyptic hellscape that has been 2020, this album makes a fitting soundtrack. Flitting between jubilant and despondent, edgy and soft, this is a sophisticated offering which will appeal to those who spent their adolescence in the grip of emo pop rock, but who now prefer a bit more nuance. (Cassie)

Ghosts of West Virginia / Earle, Steve
Singer/Songwriter/Activist Steve Earle is involved in a project concerning a coal mining explosion that killed 29 miners. He wrote the music for this public theatre project in conjunction with documentary playwrights, who interviewed the families of the dead and the few survivors. He has a distinctive voice and writes powerful lyrics. Also includes 3 songs not in the play, but of a similar theme. I particularly liked Black Lung. (Greg)

The shocking Miss Emerald. / Emerald, Caro
Dutch chanteuse Caro Emerald’s Retro, Big Band singing style will get your toes tapping and your mood uplifted! These jazzy pop songs may be the Perfect hot (Hopefully) summer) soundtrack. (David)

Baduizm. / Badu, Erykah
I’ve been doing a deep dive into the murky waters of the music of my adolescence lately. There are so many classic records in the 90s and any deep drive into this decade brings you to the glory that is Erykah Badu’s “Baduizm”. Released in 1997, this record was Badu’s debut album that crowned her the high priestess of neo-soul. This record is uniquely Badu, mixing the singing style of Billie Holiday with soul, R&B, jazz and hip-hop. It’s songs of heartbreak speak of higher issues than a first listen can provide so is worth a good listen. (Dani)

England is a garden. / Cornershop
I hadn’t listened to the band for many years, but Cornershop came back into my life right after my family and I moved to New Zealand in late 2019. Those days were joyous, yet at the same time some of the most tiring moments that I have ever lived through, immigrating to a new country and getting adjusted to a very different way of life. Cornershop squeezed its way back in during all of this, when they announced a new album coming out in March 2020 titled “England Is A Garden”. In the time of Covid-19, I can’t think of a better band and album to spend lots of my time with. From start to finish, “England Is A Garden” is a gem to listen to, but it also makes you feel good things. You think about your place in the world as you listen to the album, you realise just how wonderful and special it is to be alive, no matter what is going on all around you. Certain music connects you to things happening, while at the same time providing an escape, and “England Is A Garden” is a perfect example of this. (Justin)

The kingdom. / Bush
Supposedly inspired by being the only Rock band playing at a bunch of Metal Festivals, ‘The Kingdom’ is a surprisingly heavy return to form for the English post grunge-rockers. Frontman Gavin Rossdale brings ex-Helmet guitarist Chris Traynor up in the mix for a twin near-metal attack that showcases an album of hugely catchy riffs and soaring vocals, anchored by some of his best song-writing in years. If you enjoyed the pummelling track ‘Bullet Holes’, that played out over the credits of John Wick 3, then you’ll enjoy the sound of this follow-up album. (Mark)

American head / Flaming Lips
The Flaming Lips are a bit wacky, an acquired taste, sort of cosmic, ethereal, spacey and this latest is no different to previous albums like Yoshimi battles the pink robots. So that’s good because they offer a mix of light and heavy sounds filled with simple melodies and complex noises. The lyrics on this album can teeter on the simplistic, but there are a lot of lovely harmonies and rhythms with eclectic patterns. So, something both soothing and slightly offbeat at the same time, which is great! (Martin)

The new abnormal / Strokes
The Strokes return after 7 years with one of those great albums that rewards after repeated listens; revealing a new level of emotional maturity and shifting musical contours, that play off their previous trademark style while adding in new elements. Diverging from the shorter pop ‘verse/chorus/verse’ construct of previous albums, the songs stretch out for longer and it takes a few listens before all the inherent melodies sink in. Julian Casablancas’ lyrics are more political and mature, befitting someone now in their 40s, the songs more brooding and reflective. The band sounds more together and focused than on the last couple of albums, and you once again marvel at the level of musicianship they provide to underpin Casablancas’ vocals, culminating in the epic closing track ‘Ode To The Mets’ which ranks as one of their best tracks ever. (Mark)

Endeavour. Complete series seven.
This is a great series and has kept us captivated since season 1. This latest series is set in the ’70’s and takes me back to the fashions and foibles of my childhood. Another set of Oxford murders to solve as well as an intriguing new relationship for Endeavour Morse keeps you guessing. (Raewyn)

Mystery Men. 
Oh the 90’s, what a time for movies! Possibly one of the most 90’s movies ever made (it’s soundtrack even has Smash Mouth’s All Star), this ridiculous tale of ridiculous superheroes is lots of silly fun. All the usual names are there, Ben Stiller, Hank Azaria, Paul Reubens, Janeane Garofalo but you also get bonus Tom Waits (a mad scientist who builds non-lethal weapons, like the Blame Thrower) and Eddie Izzard (one of the villainous Disco Boys henchmen). Not to mention that the villain is named Cassanova Frankenstein. Yes, you read that correctly, Cassanova Frankenstein. It’s camp, it’s silly, Hank Azaria throws forks at people and there’s an invisible boy who can only be invisible when nobody is looking. It’s just lots of fun. (Kath)

This town
So this film was promoted as a comedy, which it sort of is… but it’s dark. Really dark. I did laugh, but more often I found myself drawing a sharp breath and thinking “Oh no!” Written, directed and starring David White, this recent New Zealand film is the story of Sean (White), a man with a troubled past searching for love. He meets Casey (Alice May Connolly), a sweet local girl and they fall for one another. But the spanner in the works of their romance is ex-cop Pam (Robyn Malcolm) who is determined to put Sean behind bars for a crime he has already been acquitted of. There is something sweet and gentle about Sean and Casey’s relationship that I found endearing, even if they are both a bit on the gormless side. It has a really good solid twist at the end that I never saw coming. (Kath)

Velvet goldmine
If you’re a fan of 70’s glam rock, like Bowie, Marc Bolan, Lou Reed, Iggy Pop etc, this film is a fictional story made up of a lot of glam rock legends… that might be true, or they might not. Christian Bale plays a young English journalist Arthur Stuart (the biggest flaw of the movie – I found him terrible and his English accent even worse) chasing the story of what happened to glam rock superstar Brian Slade (Jonathan Rhys Meyers) whose career failed after he faked is own assassination on stage. Interviewing the people closest to Slade, like his ex-wife Mandy (Toni Collette, brilliantly doing her best Angie Bowie impersonation) and reported ex-lover American glam rocker Curt Wild (Ewan MacGregor, who steals the movie in every scene he appears) finds himself disappearing down a rabbit-hole of sex, drugs and rock n roll which never quite brings him any closer to Slade’s whereabouts. Don’t let Christian Bale’s performance put you off, the rest of the cast more than make up for it. Fantastic costuming and make-up, the soundtrack is glam rock heaven and it’s one of the iconic alternative films from the late 90’s. (Kath)


The Lost Aviator A Beamafilm Documentary (Australia)
Against his families wishes Documentary maker Andrew Lancaster unveils his pioneer aviator’s uncle’s life of adventure, obsessive love and involvement in a sensational murder trial. An intriguing story with a curiously moving and haunting ending. (David)

Queens of mystery. [Series 1]
Newly promoted Detective Sergeant Matilda Stone investigates offbeat murders in a quaint English Village. Her 3 crime-writing aunts lend her their expertise, as well as unwanted dating advice. They may solve the murders, but the unexplained disappearance of Matilda’s mother 25 years ago will be harder to crack “a quality production- Very well written and acted. The whole family enjoyed it”. (Roseanne)

Neil P’s Picks:
As the WCL CD Cataloguer, these are some of my favourite new CDs…
Andy Bell – The view from halfway down
Thurston Moore – By the fire
Drab City – Good songs for bad people
Dead Famous People – Harry
Magik Markers – 2020
Heliocentrics – Telemetric sounds
Hen Ogledd – Free humans
Garcia Peoples – Nightcap at wits’ end
Fenne Lily – Breach

Shinji’s Picks:
DVD’s:
Queen and Slim
Sorry We Missed You
The End of the Golden Weather
For Sama
Homecoming (TV show)

CD’s:
Blue Nile – High[Bonus Disc]
Sault – Untitled (Black is)
Bela Fleck – Throw Down Your Heart
Julianna Barwick – Healing Is a Miracle
Aaron Parks – Little Big II: dreams of a mechanical man


Atlantic Records on the Naxos Jazz Library

One of the most important and influential record labels in soul and jazz music history, Atlantic Records produced a number of masterpieces in the 50s and 60s. They had jazz greats such as John Coltrane and Charles Mingus, and the Naxos Jazz Library offers some of their finest recordings. They are part of the Warner Music Group now and there is no ‘Atlantic Records’ in the label search. Click the link to go straight to their discography and search the artists or titles. Check our picks below and start streaming now!

Cover from Naxos COLTRANE, John: Giant Steps
Performed by: Chambers, Paul; Cobb, Jimmy; Coltrane, John; Flanagan, Tommy; Kelly, Wynton; Taylor, Art
“Coltrane’s 1959 Atlantic Records debut became his most influential album, and helped bring jazz to the mainstream. It remains one of the all time great jazz albums.” (adapted from amazon.com)

Cover from Naxos MODERN JAZZ QUARTET (THE): Complete Last Concert (The)
Performed by: Modern Jazz Quartet, The
“This two-disc live set features the Modern Jazz Quartet in its final concert (at New York City’s Lincoln Center in 1974). Though the group would later reunite in the early ’80s, there is the distinct feel of retrospective here, looking back on a career of remarkable invention and artistry. Both qualities are in ample evidence during this performance, which showcases the remarkable solo and ensemble playing of John Lewis (piano), Milt Jackson (vibes), Percy Heath (bass), and Connie Kay (drums).” (adapted from fishpond.co.nz)

Cover from Naxos MINGUS, Charles: Clown (The)
Performed by: Hadi, Shafi; Knepper, Jimmy; Legge, Wade; Mingus, Charles; Richmond, Dannie; Shepherd, Jean
“Mingus is a true original, and THE CLOWN is an album on which his genius for melding tradition with experimentation is particularly pronounced. THE CLOWN boasts outstanding compositions, superior musicianship by four members of the artist’s Jazz Workshop and what is arguably some of Mingus’s best recorded bass work.” (adapted from fishpond.co.nz)

Cover from Naxos KONITZ, Lee: Inside Hi-Fi
Performed by: Bauer, Billy; Fishkind, Arnold; Ind, Peter; Konitz, Lee; Mosca, Sal; Scott, Dick
“This excellent recording features altoist Lee Konitz with two separate quartets during 1956. Either guitarist Billy Bauer or pianist Sal Mosca are the main supporting voices in groups also including either Arnold Fishkind or Peter Ind on bass and Dick Scott on drums. The most unusual aspect to the set is that on the four selections with Mosca, Konitz switches to tenor, playing quite effectively in a recognizable cool style.” (adapted from fishpond.co.nz)

Cover from Naxos CHARLES, Ray / JACKSON, Milt: Soul Brothers/Soul Meeting
Performed by: Best, Skeeter; Charles, Ray; Jackson, Milt; Kay, Connie; Mitchell, Billy; Pettiford, Oscar
“Originally released separately as SOUL BROTHERS (Atlantic 1360) and SOUL MEETING (Atlantic 1279). These records are “cool” in the classic sense of the word: they swing, groove, whisper and discuss with the sophisticated yet down-home relaxation of a late-night session.” (adapted from fishpond.co.nz)

Cover from Naxos COLEMAN, Ornette: Change of the Century
Performed by: Cherry, Don; Coleman, Ornette; Haden, Charlie; Higgins, Billy
“Change of the Century is the fourth studio album by jazz saxophonist Ornette Coleman, released on Atlantic Records in 1960, his second for the label. Recording sessions for the album took place on October 8 and 9, 1959, at Radio Recorders in Hollywood, California. Lou Reed considered it to be the best album of all time.” (adapted from amazon.com)

Cover from Naxos ART FARMER QUARTET: To Sweden with Love
Performed by: Art Farmer Quartet
“In 1964, The Art Farmer Quartet; Art Farmer (flugelhorn); Jim Hall (guitar); Steve Swallow (bass); Pete LaRoca (drums), was touring in Sweden and felt inspired to record traditional Swedish folk songs. Featuring Farmer and Hall’s lyrical sophisticated solos, the band turns old songs into jazz without losing their essence, and make it a memorable recording” (Shinji)

Cover from Naxos LLOYD, Charles: Forest Flower – Charles Lloyd at Monterey
Performed by: DeJohnette, Jack; Jarrett, Keith; Lloyd, Charles; McBee, Cecil; McClure, Ron
“Featuring the rising stars at that time; Keith Jarrett and Jack Dejohnette, who both joined Miles Davis’ band soon after, Charles Lloyd gave the epoch-making performance at the Monterey Jazz Festival in 1966. Pushing the boundary of jazz idiom, It became history.”(Shinji)

Cover from Naxos JARRETT, Keith: Somewhere Before – The Keith Jarrett Anthology (The Atlantic Years) (1968-1975)
Performed by: Brown, Sam; Burton, Gary; Goodwin, Bill; Haden, Charlie; Jarrett, Keith; Keith Jarrett Trio; Motian, Paul; Redman, Dewey; Swallow, Steve
“2008 two CD set that focuses on the Jazz great’s years with Atlantic Records (1968-75). One of the most significant pianists in Jazz to emerge since the ’60s, Keith Jarrett’s musical career spans across four decades, during which he has been continuously growing as a powerful improviser. This double disc set includes selection from landmark albums like Life Between the Exit Signs, Somewhere Before, Birth, the Mourning of a Star and El Juicio (The Judgement), with the best of his live and studio work.” (adapted from amazon.co.uk)