Introductory Te Reo Māori Course at Kilbirnie Library

Nau mai, haere mai to ‘He Timotimo’, Wellington City Libraries’ te reo Māori taster sessions!

These are introductory classes for beginners introducing  a new topic each week as ‘he timotimo’, (a taster) to get you started learning te reo Māori. The sessions will be fun and you will be supported as you learn the basics with our specially designed programme developed by Neavin Broughton and taught in association with Te Reihine Roberts-Thompson.

Book online

When?

Thursday evenings starting Thursday 29th October for 6 weeks

5:30pm – 6:30pm.

Where?

Ruth Gotlieb (Kilbirnie) Library
101 Kilbirnie Crescent
Kilbirnie
Wellington

What?

These taster sessions are suitable for absolute beginners and we are now taking bookings. Bookings will be essential for each date as numbers are limited. You don’t need to book for all six sessions as each session is a complete class featuring pronunciation skills so you don’t need to worry if you have to miss a week.  The more classes you do means you get more chances to practice and a new topic each week keeps it interesting.

The classes are informal and you will not need textbooks or other materials, you might just want to bring a notebook and pen to take some notes.

How to Book?

Book online for each session. If you have any questions please Contact Us.

New Zealand material recent arrivals

We returned to He Matapihi library and discovered (as we have not yet been open for a full year) that in June the sun starts to stream in the windows after lunch making our window seat the place to be!  Along with the sunshine we also have the latest New Zealand material to arrive.  As always new New Zealand material covers a range of topics so check these out to see if any interest you.  These titles are proving popular so remember it’s free to place a reserve and have these titles sent to your local branch, or come in and browse the He Matapihi  New Zealand lending collection and try and catch some of the reported six minutes of Wellington sunshine.

Mighty ApeHusna’s story : my wife, the Christchurch massacre & my journey to forgiveness / Ahmed, Farid
“Husna’s Story is written by Husna’s husband Farid Ahmed. They were praying at El Noor Mosque in Christchurch when a gunman burst in and shot and killed 51 people and injured many others in a terrorist attack. This book tells Husna’s story, describing the day of the attack – in all of its normal, mundane detail up until the tragedy, and then the horrendous tragedy of what followed. Interwoven with this is the story of Husna’s life, telling of the selflessness and bravery with which she lived her life. As well as looking after her paraplegic husband, Husna was an important member of the community, helping women when they were giving birth, running classes for children and helping many others. Her last selfless act was going back into the mosque to look for her husband on that fateful day. She had already led the other women and children to safety. Tragically she was shot. Husna’s husband, Farid Ahmed, quite incredibly, forgives the alleged killer. His remarkable philosophy of forgiveness, peace and love is an example of how religion and faith, through personal application, can be a tool for navigating the most horrific of tragedies.” (Publisher’s description)

Mighty ApeThe new photography : New Zealand’s first generation contemporary photographers / McCredie, Athol
“In this handsome book, leading photography curator Athol McCredie tells the story of the beginnings of contemporary photography — also known as art photography — in New Zealand. Through interviews with the photographers Gary Baigent, Richard Collins, John Daley, John Fields, Max Oettli, John B Turner, Len Wesney and Ans Westra, and accompanied by an outstanding introductory essay, McCredie shows how the break-through approach of personal documentary photography created a new field of photography in New Zealand that was not simply illustrative but rather spoke for itself and with its own language.” (Catalogue)

Mighty ApeNew Zealand seaweeds : an illustrated guide / Nelson, W. A.
“This fully revised edition describes over 150 genera and 250 key species across three main sections covering green, brown and red algae. Each species entry includes up-to-date information on nomenclature, type locality, morphology, habitat and distribution and gives notes on identification and key characters. Features reproductions of the paintings of celebrated botanical artist Nancy Adams.” (Catalogue)

Fish PondThe longest day : standing up to depression and tackling the Coast to Coast / Calman, Matt
“Matt Calman’s most consistent tool for dealing with problems throughout his life was alcohol. But it got to the stage where he was no longer willing to put up with the dark side of his drinking. So he quit. But the problems that had been simmering away for most of his life merely came to a head. It led to a major depressive phase with panic attacks and thoughts of suicide. Finally Matt began the slow climb to rebuild himself with a much stronger foundation. Finally he was ready to find something, or for something to find him. It could have been anything. It just happened to be the Coast to Coast Multisport World Championships, the toughest endurance race in New Zealand. The Longest Day outlines Matt’s path back from the depths of depression, his struggles to learn to run, cycle and kayak at an elite level, and the culmination of all that training: his Coast to Coast race. The book explores the parallels between the inner landscape (his journey to well being) and the outer landscape (the world around him and tackling the Coast to Coast). Through his training he learns about process rather than outcome, and how true success and enjoyment is embedded in the journey (not the destination). Matt is a brave, honest writer with a talent for articulating what is going on inside his head.” (Catalogue)

Mighty ApeAll the way to summer : stories of love and longing / Kidman, Fiona
“Fiona Kidman’s early stories about New Zealand women’s experiences scandalised readers with their vivid depictions of the heartbreaks and joys of desire, illicit liaisons and unconventional love. Her writing made her a feminist icon in the early 1980s, and she has since continued to tell the realities of women’s lives, her books resonating with many readers over the years and across the world. To mark her 80th birthday, this volume brings together a variety of her previously published stories as well as several that are new or previously uncollected; all moving, insightful and written with love. The final stories trace her own history of love, a memoir of significant people from childhood and beyond” (Catalogue)

Mighty ApeThe burning river / Patchett, Lawrence
“In a radically changed Aotearoa New Zealand, Van’s life in the swamp is hazardous. Sheltered by Rau and Matewai, he mines plastic and trades to survive. When a young visitor summons him to the fenced settlement on the hill, he is offered a new and frightening responsibility-a perilous inland journey that leads to a tense confrontation and the prospect of a rebuilt world.” (Catalogue)

Mighty ApePoetry New Zealand Yearbook. 2020
“Each year Poetry New Zealand, this country’s longest-running poetry magazine, rounds up new poetry, reviews and essays, making it the ideal way to catch up with the latest poetry from both established and emerging New Zealand poets. Issue #54 features 130 new poems (including by this year’s featured poet, rising star Essa May Ranapiri, and C.K. Stead, Elizabeth Smither, Kevin Ireland, Chris Tse, Gregory Kan, Fardowsa Mohammed and Tracey Slaughter); essays (including a graphic essay by Sarah Laing); and reviews of new poetry collections. Poems by the winners of both the Poetry New Zealand Award and the Poetry New Zealand Schools Award are among the line-up.” (Catalogue)

Mighty ApeThe case for cannabis law reform / McLeod, Vince
“The Case For Cannabis Law Reform makes a comprehensive argument for reforming our cannabis laws. Across 58 fully-referenced chapters, this book covers practical, moral, economic, cultural, medicinal, historical and spiritual reasons to repeal cannabis prohibition – among others” (Catalogue)

Imagining decolonisation. 
“Decolonisation is a term that scares some, and gives hope to others. It is an uncomfortable and bewildering concept for many New Zealanders yet needed if we are going to build a country that is fair and equal for all who live there. This book sets out the case for decolonisation by illuminating through anecdotal, real life examples — what decolonisation might look and feel like.” (Catalogue)

Lockdown Goals – Kickstart learning te reo Māori

Resources to learn the Māori Language

We have these two amazing books in our catalogue that would be just perfect to get you started in learning te reo Māori but, before you race to the catalogue to download them and get started, I need to let you know that just one of them is available as an ebook, the link is below.

The amazing author, Hēmi Kelly, wanted to help everyone out and he has started a Facebook group called  “A Māori Phrase a Day”.  He has selected phrases from the book that everyone can learn as a helpful resource during the level 4 Rāhui (lockdown).

It’s a public group so just click here to go directly there.  If you just want to watch the videos in order (as the feed is full of positive feedback and questions for Hēmi so may be hard to find), you can just click on the video tab to find all the videos together.

Now to his titles here on our catalogue:

A Māori phrase a day : 365 phrases to kickstart your reo / Kelly, Hēmi
Also available as an ebook now, check it on Overdrive.
“A Maori Phrase a Day offers a simple, fun and practical entry into the Maori language. Through its 365 Maori phrases, you will learn the following: Everyday uses English translations Factoids and memory device Handy word lists Presenting the most common, relevant and useful phrases today, A Maori Phrase a Day is the perfect way to kickstart your te reo journey!” (Catalogue)

A Māori word a day : 365 words to kickstart your reo / Kelly, Hēmi
A Maori Word a Day offers an easy, instant and motivating entry into the Maori language. Through its 365 Maori words, you will learn the following
– English translations
– Word category, notes and background information
– Sample sentences, in both te reo Maori and English
Exploring the most common, modern and contemporary words in use today,  A Maori Word a Day is the perfect way to kickstart your te reo journey!” (Catalogue)


Okay so now you can go and put one of these titles on your reserve list and, just in case you hadn’t heard the good news, reserves are free and you can choose any of our library branches (once we reopen) to collect them from.  Actually just before you do that, read on and check out a couple of apps I’ve listed below that you can use on your phone to learn Māori kupu as well.

Apps to learn Māori Language Vocabulary

Here are two apps, Tipu and Kupu that you can use on your phone to learn te reo Māori vocabulary.  If you would like to make some labels to learn the words for everyday items around your house then I suggest you take a look at the app ‘Kupu’. It’s lots of fun taking photos and learning the te reo Māori translations of many of the objects in your own home bubble.

Tipu will help you to learn Te Reo Māori quickly!

Koi is your teacher and she has an innovative Personalised Progression Memory which allows her to remember what words and phrases you know and which ones you need a little extra testing on. This ensures that you are learning as quickly as possible.

Download Tipu here 

Kupu is really easy to use and of course, lots of Wellingtonians will need the kupu for coffee!   Simply take a picture and Kupu will then use image recognition to identify what the object is in the picture and provide Te Reo Māori translations for the object(s). 

Perfect to label things in your bubble! 

Download Kupu here

 

 

You might be surprised to discover you already know quite a few of the kupu when you start watching the Facebook videos or using these apps.  Philip Matthews in a Stuff article published on the 8th Sept 2018 titled ‘The borrowers: Why you are speaking more Māori than you think’  says that;

There will be around seven Māori words in every 1000 words of New Zealand English, including the names of places and people. That may not sound like a lot, but it is relatively high and it makes New Zealand unique among post-settler societies, historians say. You do not see similar borrowing at work in Australia and North America.

So you may know more than you think!  If learning te reo Māori is one of your lockdown goals and a way to make the most of some the free time you might have during the lockdown period or you could use it as a break from work, if you are working from home, then give it a go! Or to say it in te reo Māori,  karawhiua!

That’s all from me for now, so yes, you can go and put one of Hēmi’s titles on your reserve list now!

Ancestry database now available at home

Staying at home may mean you are doing some of those things that have been sitting on your ‘To Do’  list for a long time.  If one of those tasks has been to sort through old family photos and papers and that gets you thinking that it’s time to research your family history but sadly the library is closed, then we have great news for you!

With kind permission from the people at Ancestry and Proquest, Wellington City Libraries’ cardholders will be able to access this amazing family history database from their own homes.  Usually, Ancestry is only available using our Library subscription from a library computer, but from now until the 30th April you will be able to have the same free access we can usually provide at the library in the comfort of your own home bubble.

**Update: home access to Ancestry has been extended until 31 December 2020!**

Ancestry

Ancestry Library is a research database for genealogists and family history enthusiasts aiding you to trace your family history, with records from the US, UK, Ireland, Australia and New Zealand.

That includes historical births, deaths and marriages and electoral rolls.

To access the free library Ancestry database go here and login with your card details.  If you don’t have a library card yet you can register online to become a library member.

There are also lots of helpful links and advice on our genealogy page here  and our heritage page here.

Have fun but a word of warning – starting family research and the thrill of the hunt can be quite addictive, so be careful you don’t get lost chasing leads down too many rabbit holes!!

60th Anniversary of the Antarctic Treaty

On December 1st 1969 New Zealand signed the Antarctic Treaty with the primary aim that Antarctica is to be used exclusively for science and other peaceful purposes. The NZ Antarctic Society is marking the 50th anniversary with the launch of a new map of Antarctica at the National Library of New Zealand on the 21st of November and an exhibition of previous maps. If you are visiting the “Mapping Antarctica – the frozen continent revealed” three week mini-exhibition at the National Library here at He Matapihi Molesworth Library, our Wellington City Libraries branch inside the National Library, we are pleased to put on display these titles and others featuring Antarctica and the New Zealanders associated with this region from our He Matapihi collection.


A wise adventure. II, New Zealand and Antarctica after 1960 / Templeton, Malcolm
Since the adoption of the Antarctic Treaty in 1959, Antarctica has been governed through a unique system of international collaboration.  This book is an important chronicle of New Zealand’s engagement in Antarctica and a detailed and fascinating window on the complex negotiations arounf governance in this remarkable part of the planet. (Back cover abridged)

Mapping Antarctica : a five hundred year record of discovery / Clancy, Robert
“This volume tells the story of Antarctica through original maps.  These maps, many very rare, have been re-produced in high resolution and represent all major events, from the discovery and exploration of Antarctica to the scientific exploration of glaciers. This volume tells the story of Antarctica through original maps. These maps, many very rare, have been re-produced in high resolution and represent all major events, from the discovery and exploration of Antarctica to the scientific exploration of glaciers.” (Catalogue)

Antarctic Tragedy

We can’t talk about Antarctica without mentioning the Erebus disaster.  New Zealanders have a long relationship and fascination with Antarctica.  Air New Zealand started running sightseeing flights to Antarctica in February 1977 and between 1977 and 1979 they had carried approximately 10,000 passengers to Antarctica. This month we especially remember as we approach the 40th anniversary of the tragic scenic flight that crashed into Mount Erebus becoming our worst air disaster. November 28th 1979 was a dark day in New Zealand’s history and part of the national psyche for most New Zealanders. At the time there were only one or two degrees of separation with so many either knowing a victim of the Erebus disaster or knowing people that knew them. This year there is a new publication Toward the mountain: a story of grief and hope forty years on from Erebus written by one of the affected families.

Towards the mountain: a story of grief and hope forty years on from Erebus / Myles, Sarah
“Marking the 40th anniversary of the Erebus disaster, this is the first book on that tragedy written by one of the affected families.” (Catalogue)

Daughters of Erebus / Holmes, Paul
“The technical side of what happened on Mt Erebus on that fateful November day back in 1979 has been brilliantly explained by Justice Mahon, the Royal Commissioner appointed to investigate the crash of the Air New Zealand DC 10. Daughters of Erebus is the story of five people who were left behind and how the whole tragedy affected their lives.  This is a New Zealand story told by one of the great New Zealand storytellers. It literally drips with pathos and is a must-read story.” (Catalogue)

Our fascination  with Antarctica

Our library collection reflects our fascination with Antarctica.  For further points of interest, we feature heroic exploits of New Zealand explorers, photographic studies of nature and the relics of early exploration, scientific expeditions, works of fiction and children’s non-fiction all, of course, featuring Antarctica.

Sir Edmund Hillary : an extraordinary life / Johnston, Alexa
“Around the world Sir Edmund Hillary is a legendary figure – climber, bold adventurer, practical philanthropist and one of the most widely respected persons of our time. He has survived extremes of human experience – from historic triumphs to crushing personal loss ? but he sees himself as an ordinary man, persistent rather than heroic. This lavishly illustrated book focuses on the highlights of his life, including: Conquering Everest; Journeying to the South Pole by tractor; Himalayan adventures; Philanthropist to the Sherpa people. This beautiful book is profusely illustrated, using fascinating material, such as letters, cards, diary pages, and ephemera, from his personal archive. It is a magnificent tribute to one of the greatest climbers and explorers of all time.” (Catalogue)

Frank Worsley: Shackleton’s fearless captain / Thomson, John
“This book is a biography of Frank Worsley, without doubt one of New Zealand’s greatest, but largely unsung adventuring heroes. Born in Akaroa he went to sea as a teenager in 1888 on the sailing ships plying their trade between New Zealand and England. But the greatest adventure of his life began when he became the captain of Sir Ernest Shackleton’s ship Endurance, which was trapped in pack ice on the 1914-1916 Antarctic expedition and slowly crushed. The crew of 28 spent over a year camped on the Antarctic ice before Shackleton, Worsley and four others sailed a tiny lifeboat across the wild Southern Ocean to South Georgia to summon help for the rest of the men, who were all eventually rescued.” (Catalogue)

With Hillary at Scott Base: a Kiwi among the penguins / Gerard, V. B. This account of the early days at the New Zealand Antarctic Base, known as Scott Base, was first written over half a century ago from the author’s diary and memory. The book is about the establishment of the base. (Back Cover abridged)

Still life : inside the Antarctic huts of Scott and Shackleton / Ussher, Jane
“A magnificent, hauntingly beautiful photographic study of the Antarctic huts that served as expedition bases for explorations led by Captain Robert Falcon Scott and Sir Ernest Shackleton the turn of the 20th century Antarctic explorers set off from their huts in search of adventure, science, and glory, while the huts were left as time capsules of Edwardian life. The executive director of the Trust provides a fascinating introduction to the history and atmosphere of each hut and detailed photographic captions. Diary excerpts from the explorers bring their time in the huts to life.” (Catalogue)

Post marks : the way we were : early New Zealand postcards, 1897-1922 / Haks, Leo
“The way we were between 1897-1922 is revealed in more than 500 postcards that highlight New Zealand’s pioneer beginnings and the development of a unique cultural identity.” (Catalogue)

White silence : Grahame Sydney’s Antarctica. / Sydney, Grahame
“This outstanding collection of photographs from one of New Zealand’s most pre-eminent artists, Grahame Sydney, pays homage to the Antarctic landscape. At the invitation of Antarctica New Zealand, Sydney travelled to Antarctica in November-December 2003, and again in October 2006. His photographs reveal an extraordinary terrain that is solemn, sparse and poised with a magnificent stillness. Exploring a continent that appears at first glance to be devoid of colour, warmth or comfort, each image celebrates the rare flashes of astonishing beauty that can be found in the bleakest, most inhospitable region of Earth.” (Catalogue)

Fifteen million years in Antarctica / Priestley, Rebecca
“Rebecca Priestley longs to be in Antarctica. But it is also the last place on Earth she wants to go. In 2011 Priestley visited the wide white continent for the first time, on a trip that coincided with the centenary of Robert Falcon Scott’s fateful trek to the South Pole. For Priestley, 2011 was the fulfilment of a dream that took root in a childhood full of books, art and science and grew stronger during her time as a geology student in the 1980s. Priestley reflects on what Antarctica can tell us about Earth’s future and asks: do people even belong in this fragile, otherworldly place?” (Catalogue)

Call of the ice : fifty years of New Zealand in Antarctica / Harrowfield, David L.
“This book is a celebration not only of Antarctica, and more specifically the Ross Sea region, but also of the many men and women who have contributed to our understanding of this unique environment and its impact on our world.” (Catalogue)

Innocents in the Dry Valleys : an account of the Victoria University of Wellington Antarctic Expedition, 1958-59 / Bull, Colin
“In 1958-59 a physicist, a biologist and two undergraduate geology students from Victoria University of Wellington spent a summer examining the Dry Valleys of Victoria Land, Antarctica. This expedition, known as VUWAE 2, began what was to become an annual and very fruitful Antarctic research programme for the university over the next fifty years. With wry humour, Bull recounts the adventures of these four hardy and resourceful scientists, who seemed to thrive on the adverse conditions, lack of funding and battles with bureaucracy.” (Catalogue)

Melt / Murray, Jeff
“This novel is an urgent, crushing observation of adaptation and exclusion amidst preparation to settle Antarctica as climate destruction starts to bite. New Zealand in 2048, gateway to the melting continent, is thrust into the centre of the climate crises. Vai Shuster, the Advocate of a tiny, broken island, must find a place for her community in a world that’s not sure it needs the poor.” (Catalogue)

Antarctic journeys / Werry, Philippa
“Antarctica is a fascinating place: it has no native inhabitants, and it’s very remote, which means everyone who goes there today or in the past has a special reason for wanting to go. It’s a place that children can only imagine, because they can’t go there. This book is about the journeys (historic and contemporary, human and animal, large and small) that centre around Antarctica, using that theme to build up an overall picture of Antarctic history, geography, science and wildlife.” (Catalogue)

Te Wiki o te Reo Māori – Māori Language Week

Since 1975 New Zealand has celebrated Māori Language Week and each year it has become more and more of a major fixture with many events held over the week.  The week which runs from Monday 9th – Sunday 15th September provides a chance to promote positive experiences and to gain a new awareness of the Māori language, and for those that speak the language an opportunity to use it and share it with others.  The theme chosen for 2019 is again ‘Kia Kaha te Reo Māori’.  ‘Kia Kaha’ is often used and understood by many in New Zealand as meaning ‘be strong’.  So ‘Kia Kaha te Reo Māori’ means  – ‘Let’s make the Māori language strong’.

Kōhunga Kōrero at Arapaki Manners – Māori language storytime

Come along to our new city library branch ‘Arapaki Manners’ for storytime in te reo Māori and get ready for the start of Māori Language Week.  It’s exciting to again be able to offer a children’s storytime in the CBD and there will be lots of waiata and stories.

 

 

What: Kōhunga Kōrero – Māori Language Storytime
When: Saturday 7th September 10:00 – 10:30 am
Where: Arapaki Manners Library, 12 Manners Street
Who: A whānau event suitable for pre-schoolers and primary aged children

 

 

Māori Language Pre-school Storytimes and Baby Rock & Rhyme

We are also going to run some of our regular preschool storytimes and  Baby Rock & Rhyme in te reo Māori during Te Wiki o te Reo Māori.  These are enjoyable no matter what level of te reo Māori you have.   The free, weekly interactive sessions are a great opportunity to have fun, socialise and spend quality ‘one-on-one’ time with your child and have fun with te reo Māori.  It doesn’t matter if you don’t speak Māori as the presenters make it fun for everyone. Pre-school storytimes are fun and free – there’s no charge, and you don’t have to book.  

What: Kōhunga Kōrero – Māori Language Storytime
When: Monday 9th September 10:30 – 11:00 am
Where: Karori Library, 247 Karori Road
Who: A whānau event suitable for pre-schoolers

What: Baby Rock n Rhyme  in te reo Māori
When: Tuesday 10th 9:30 – 10:00 am
Where: Island Bay Library, 167 The Parade
Who: for parents and carers to interact with their babies through rhymes, finger-plays, and stories

What: Preschool Storytime – in te reo Māori
When: Wednesday 10th 10:30 – 11:00 am
Where: Kilbirnie Library, 101 Kilbirnie Cres
Who:  A whānau event suitable for pre-schoolers 

After Māori Language Week

Once Māori Language Week is over you can still attend Māori language storytimes.  Monthly storytimes in te reo Māori are available at Miramar, Newtown, Johnsonville and Karori libraries. Open to anyone, these free thirty-minute sessions feature stories, rhymes, and waiata in te reo Māori, and are perfect for 2-6 year olds and their caregivers

Kōhunga Kōrero: Pakiwaitara i roto i te reo Māori. E 30 meneti pakiwaitara, rotarota, waiata hoki i roto i te reo Māori mō ngā kōhungahunga me ō rātou mātua kaitiaki.

1st Tuesday of each month at 10.30am
Omāroro (Newtown) Library
13 Constable Street, Newtown

2nd Monday of each month at 10.30am
Te Māhanga (Karori) Library
247 Karori Road, Karori

3rd Tuesday of each month at 10.30am
Waitohi (Johnsonville) Library
5 Broderick Road, Johnsonville

4th Tuesday of each month at 2 pm
Motukairangi (Miramar) Library
68 Miramar Avenue, Miramar

Check out the Library event calendar for specific dates.

Raranga / Weaving Workshops for Matariki

Matariki ahunga nui – Matariki, provider of plentiful food

Late in June, Matariki will reappear in the dawn sky signaling the Māori New Year.  In Poneke local iwi acknowledge the rising of Puanga.   It is a time to celebrate life, remember those who have passed away and to plan for the future.  It is a time to gather together and share and learn new skills.

This year Wellington City Libraries has arranged for a series of raranga or weaving workshops in some of our branch libraries and community centres over the month of Pipiri (June).   We have arranged for knowledgeable people to assist us with harvesting the harakeke (flax) using the correct tikanga (protocols) prior to each session  so we will have freshly harvested harakeke for each workshop.

RARANGA WORKSHOPS
The workshops will be with small groups and you will be instructed in weaving a small kono or food basket with harakeke.  Bookings are essential as numbers are limited so book with the branch or community centre hosting the workshop you would like to attend using the contact details provided below.

Newtown Library 
Friday 7th  June
10:00am-12:00pm
04 389 -2830 or  contact here 

Newlands Community Centre
Saturday 8th June
10:00am -12:00pm
04 477 3724 or contact here

Karori Library
Thursday 20th June
2:00pm – 4:00pm
04 476 8413 or contact here

Island Bay Community Centre
Wednesday 26th June
12:30pm-2:30pm
04 383 7464 or contact here

Motu Kairangi – A free lunchtime kōrero

Nau mai, haere mai

Wellington City Libraries presents a free lunchtime kōrero about the history of Te Motu Kairangi (The Miramar peninsula).

WATTS PENINSULA: Public walking trails will be established and Fort Ballance will be restored.

The Speaker Morrie Love will mark the signing of Te Tiriti o Waitangi at Te Whanganui-a-Tara, on the 29th April 1840 in his kōrero of Te Motu Kairangi.

Date: Monday 29th April

Place: St Andrew’s Conference Centre, Hall (access to the right of the St Andrew’s on the Terrace building)

Time:  12:30 – 1:15pm

Enquiries to ann.reweti@wcc.govt.nz

One version of the story of the settlement of the eastern shores of Te Whanaganui-a-Tara by Ngāi Tara, Ngāti Itra is told by Elsdon Best in The land of Tara – we have this digitised version  on our Māori Resource page.

The migrations of iwi and hapū from the East Coast – the stories of Ngāti Porou / Ngāti Kahungunu are a complex acount of journeys, fighting and intermarriage.  “Ngāti Kahungunu” was the blanket label given to the eastern tribes by Te Atiawa as the Taranaki iwi sought to plant their foothold on the western shores and the inner harbour between 1820s and 1840s – up to the arrival of the New Zealand Company and its first six ships of immigrants in 1839-1840.

You can also check out our Te Whanganui-a-Tara index of Māori history and here are some eBooks from our catalogue on ‘Te Tirit o Waitangi’.

The Treaty of Waitangi / Orange, Claudia
“Since its publication in 1987, Claudia Orange’s book has become the standard guide to one of the key documents in New Zealand history, selling over 40,000 copies. The complexities of the Treaty, which have done so much to shape New Zealand history for nearly 200 years, are thoughtfully explored as Orange examines the meanings the document has held for Māori and Pākehā. A new introduction brings it up to date with all that has happened since, complementing the book’s lucid and well-researched exploration of how and why the Treaty was signed.” (Catalogue)

Treaty of Waitangi [electronic resource] / Calman, Ross
“The book’s first two parts consider how the Christian word was spread and how Maori responded, explaining the identification they felt with the Israelites of the Old Testament. The third part relates the rise of indigenous religious movements, from the early Papahurihia through Pai Marire, Ringatu and the Parihaka Movement, and the later incarnations of the Arowhenua Movement in the South Island and what remains today’s leading Maori church, Ratana.” (Catalogue)

Treaty of Waitangi settlements
“The settlement of iwi claims under the Treaty of Waitangi has drawn international attention, as other nations seek ways to build new relationships between indigenous peoples and the state. Here leading scholars consider the impact of Treaty settlements on the management and ownership of key resources (lands, forests and fisheries); they look at the economic and social consequences for Māori, and the impact of the settlement process on Crown–Māori relationships. And they ask ‘how successful has the settlement process been?'” (Catalogue)

The story of a treaty / Orange, Claudia
“The Treaty of Waitangi is a central document in New Zealand history. This lively account tells the story of the Treaty from its signing in 1840 through the debates and struggles of the nineteenth century to the gathering political momentum of recent decades. The second edition of this popular book brings the story up to the present”–Back cover.” (Catalogue)

What about the newspapers?

We know many of you will be missing using the resources that were up on the second floor of the Central Library.  We thought we would put together some information for some other ways to access New Zealand reference material, newspapers, journals, genealogy information and local history materials.

NEWSPAPERS

Many of the visitors to the second floor came to access local, national and international newspapers so we know that these resources will really be missed. At our branch libraries, you can still read some actual titles or use the online database of PressReader on the branch computers. You can also access PressReader on your home computer or via an app on a device.

Branch Collections The current week’s issues of the Dominion Post are available at all branch libraries. Karori Library also holds the current week of the New Zealand Herald. Newtown Library receives the Samoa Times, the Cook Island News and Taimi Tonga. The Sunday Star Times is available at Island Bay, Kilbirnie, Miramar, Newtown, Tawa, Brooklyn, Karori and Johnsonville branch libraries.

PressReader is a platform which enables you to easily read current newspapers online for free. All you need is your Wellington City Libraries card! PressReader boasts an impressive 2446 newspapers across 120 countries, from Lesotho to Luxembourg. To access PressReader from your phone or computer, go to online databases, then select PressReader newspapers & magazines from the drop-down menu and press “go.” Follow the prompts and enter your library card number and surname. PressReader also holds an extensive range of magazine titles.

Amongst many other publications, you can read the following titles on PressReader:

  • The Dominion Post
  • The New Zealand Herald
  • The Press (Christchurch)
  • Otago Daily Times
  • The Guardian

Microfilm

With our microfilm collection no longer accessible you may need to visit the National Library to view newspaper microfilms, but don’t forget to check out our online databases where you can access a wealth of material from the newspaper section and journals from the Magazine section.

Here are three of the very helpful newspaper and journal databases you can access using online databases.

Papers Past – freely available online and includes digitizations of historic New Zealand newspapers from the 19th and 20th centuries. Perfect for budding historians and anyone wanting to research the history of local people and places! Wellington papers The Dominion are available from 1907 – 1920 and The Evening Post from 1865 – 1945.

Australia & New Zealand NewsStream –  NewsStream hosts the written components of newspaper articles from New Zealand publications dating from 1996, including the Dominion, the Evening Post, the Dominion Post. Note that these online articles do not include photographs and are formatted generically. You can access Australia & New Zealand NewsStream through our.

Australia/New Zealand Reference Centre – This database combines Australia and New Zealand specific magazines, newspapers & newswires, reference books, and company information to create the largest collection of regional full text content available. It provides local perspectives on current events, business, sports, and many other subjects.  Titles include Australian House & Garden, Australian Geographic, NZ Business, New Zealand Management, Metro, Australia Country Report, New Zealand Country Report, the New Zealand Herald, the Dominion Post etc. Click for a full list of titles in Australia/New Zealand Reference Centre. Some key Wellington publication links are:

  • The Dominion/The Dominion Post, 1995- (Full text available)

New Zealand History

If you are looking for New Zealand History material, and you have tried the catalogue to check, and the branch collections don’t have it, you might find what you need in the excellent material available on our Online Databases.  Check out the New Zealand section, it has the New Zealand flag picture. Here you can find online collections of New Zealand history books.

BWB  The New Zealand History Collection -provides complete online access to a major, authoritative resource – over thirty years of award-winning history and biography publishing from Bridget Williams.  Books.  Comprising over ninety titles, it includes recent additions such as the widely acclaimed Great War for New Zealand by Vincent O’Malley, multiple works by late historian Judith Binney and A History of New Zealand Women by Barbara Brookes.

BWB Texts Collection – Brings together a diverse group of short eBooks on the big issues facing New Zealand. Dive in to discover stories, insights and analysis by some of New Zealand’s best writers and commentators. Titles can be read on any device and new titles are added to the collection each month.

BWB Treaty of Waitangi Collection – Gathers together some of the finest writing and scholarship on New Zealand’s founding document online. It features unrestricted access to award-winning histories and commentaries, such as Claudia Orange’s The Treaty of Waitangi, which can either be read in their entirety or searched across for quick reference. Optimised for mobile and tablet devices, this database is delivered entirely within the web browser and is accessible on any device.

eBooks and eAudiobooks – Overdrive Aotearoa Collection – Free eBook and downloadable eAudiobook collection containing fiction and nonfiction titles, including many New Zealand titles

If you want to find out more about how to start using our eLibrary resources click here for help

 Genealogy

To continue or start your family history project, the in-library databases Ancestry and Find my Past are  available at branch libraries.  (Ancestry can be used for searches of New Zealand specific databases such as New Zealand Electoral rolls (from 1853 to 1981) as well as databases from all over the world.   There are also many links to genealogical sources from our Popular Topics Genealogy page.  You can also visit the National Library if you need to access birth, death and marriage microfiche for events after those that are freely available from the historical Births Deaths and Marriages  website.

Local History

With the closure of the Central library building our Local History specialist Gábor Tóth wanted to ensure that we informed everyone that he was starting to add more and more digitized material to Wellington Recollect, our local heritage resource,  a database of heritage photos, books, maps and related ephemera reflecting the Capital’s past. The database is administered by Wellington City Libraries. You can also find Recollect and many other local history resources on our Heritage page.

Another great source for local history is available on the Wellington City Council website.  There is the Cemeteries search, and details about the Wellington City Archives. You can find digitised versions of the   Wellington Heritage Trails and local heritage information on Wellington heritage buildings at the  Wellington Heritage page.

To finish off we thought we should have some fun with Wellington Recollect to have a look at the location of the pop-up library (12 Manners Street) that has been announced and found this great photo (c. 1927) looking down from Boulcott Street towards Manners Street with a tram at the Willis Street intersection and the pop-up will be located in that block  You can check the image out on Wellington Recollect by clicking on the photo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wellington City Libraries (19th Oct 2018). Looking down Boulcott Street towards Manners Street. In Website Wellington City Libraries. Retrieved 4th Apr 2019 12:33, from https://wellington.recollect.co.nz/nodes/view/316

Wandering around the new books of the New Zealand Collection

Kia ora, let’s take a meander through the shelves to see what’s new in the New Zealand Collection this month.

There are numerous water issues being discussed around the country and there is a new book about efforts to save Te Waikoropupū Springs told with poetry and images.

Samoan Queer lives are documented with story and portrait. Memoirs of musician Graeme Jefferies, whose career was spent with bands Nocturnal Projections, This Kind of Punishment and The Cakekitchen as well as being a solo artist, and  one from  poet and author Jeffrey Paparoa Holman.
A collection of recent plays in ‘The recent art of actually caring and other New Zealand plays‘ talks about how new theatre is capturing the stories of increasingly diverse New Zealanders.

There are new editions to the poetry shelf and of course beautiful scenery in ‘Wanaka: lake, mountain, adventure‘.  Our last peek is at ‘Thorny encounters: a history of England v the All Blacks‘ about the first 4o rugby internationals between the All Blacks and England.

Time to pick your favourite new book and sit down to read!

Water protectors : the story of the campaign to save Te Waikoropupū Springs in poetry and images / Moran, Kevin
“The Story of the Campaign To Save Te Waikoropupu Springs in poetry and images. Te Waikoropupu Springs in Golden Bay New Zealand is a national treasure. Crystal clear waters surge to the surface to form a bubbling fount. Over 90,000 people flock to visit each year. Yet Te Waikoropupū is under deadly threat. Nitrate leaching from intensive dairy farms is the culprit. You will read of protests, passionate petitions and about the small Iwi battling to protect Te Waikoropupu through the implementation of a Water Conservation Order.” (Abridged Catalogue)

Samoan queer lives / McMullin, Dan Taulapapa
“Featuring 20 autobiographical stories from fa`afafine and LGBTIQ Samoans based in Samoa, Amerika Samoa, Australia, Aotearoa NZ, Hawai`i and USA. Includes a foreword and introduction by co-editors Yuki Kihara and Dan Taulapapa McMullin. Each story is accompanied by a portrait.” (Catalogue)

Time flowing backwards : a memoir / Jefferies, Graeme
“Time Flowing Backwards is the fascinating and revealing story of Graeme Jefferies–one of the most inventive and influential musicians to emerge from New Zealand’s vibrant independent music scene in the 1980s. This memoir spans over three decades of Jefferies’ career spent with bands Nocturnal Projections, This Kind of Punishment and The Cakekitchen as well as a solo artist.” (Abridged Catalogue)

The intricate art of actually caring, and other New Zealand plays
“Theater in New Zealand began as a tool of the British Empire, imported along with Christianity, seeds, and other commodities as a way of acculturating the indigenous Maori population. In the decades since, it has been turned to different ends, and is now a crucial outlet for the voices of the ever more diverse population of New Zealanders.” (Abridged Catalogue)

Now when it rains : a writer’s memoir / Holman, Jeffrey Paparoa
“Jeffrey Paparoa Holman examines a life lived over 70 years through rapid social changes and personal upheavals, from the 1950s to the 2000s, as he stumbles towards becoming the writer he believed he could be. Growing up on the West Coast in the shadow of his father’s war and later imprisonment, he drops out of university and learns too much about drugs & alcohol while working as a shearer, bin-man and fisherman. Later in life he learns te reo and publishes groundbreaking history and memoir. This is a vital chronicle of our times; a frank and compelling insight into the writer’s mind – and soul.” (Catalogue)

The edge of things / Powell, Anne
“Anne Powell’s poems reach from the soul-baring Waikanae River all the way across the earth to cascades of stars over cold desert sand. At times focusing on the wealth of wisdom nature imparts upon patient observation, at others on the daily realities of those people who live beyond our familiar trajectories, Anne Powell stays grounded in her ability to see the sacred in a world of both stillness and disturbance.” (Catalogue)

One hundred poems and a year / Orr, Bob
“Rucksack Consider this book of mine as if it were a rucksack containing what you might need if you were to step outside your door. There are poems heavily knitted as fishermen’s jerseys in case you should find yourself all at sea. others are like handkerchiefs you can put in your pocket – some of these poems are commonplace as soap – you can stand under the shower with them. Some are casual as jandals – one or two have soles tough as tramping boots. I wrote them while walking down a road with bare feet.” (Catalogue)

A traveller’s history of New Zealand and the South Pacific islands / Chambers, John H.
A traveller’s history of New Zealand and the South Pacific islands gives the curious tourist not only a modern day portrait of New Zealand and the far flung islands, their political systems and economic diversity, but also looks at the early settling of this massive area which covers about a fifth of the entire surface of the earth. The story of the peopling of the South Pacific Islands and NZ is one of the world’s great epics which the author conveys.” (Abridged Catalogue)

Wanaka : lake, mountain, adventure / Peat, Neville
“Neville Peat describes the scenic splendour of Wanaka and the myriad activities and attractions for visitors in this updated edition of a book that serves as both a guide to one of New Zealand’s tourism hotspots, and as a souvenir.The book covers the history of the Wanaka area and its progress into a contemporary centre renowned for an exciting range of outdoor activities and regular events, including the internationally recognized Warbirds Over Wanaka air show. Further material offers a guide to local walking and cycling tracks, local flora and fauna, and Mt Aspiring National Park.” (Catalogue)

Thorny encounters : a history of England v the All Blacks / Elliott, Matt
“In 1905, Vic Cartwright’s England rugby team lined up against Dave Gallaher’s touring All Blacks at Crystal Palace–the first ever meeting of two national teams. Ensuing matches, in both the amateur and professional eras, have been dramatic and controversial, steeped in the historical rivalry of the traditional home of the game for the nation that has claimed rugby as its own. Thorny Encounters chronicles the first 40 rugby internationals between England and New Zealand, spanning 1905 to 2014. Historic encounters between men in white and black have been dramatic, controversial, and steeped in historical rivalry.” (Abridged Catalogue)