Landscape image featuring three book covers from our recent picks.

Parables for our planet: New science

Still looking for a sustainable New Years resolution? This month’s new science picks should be of interest!

From a in-depth look into our earth’s climate history in Brian Fagan’s Climate Chaos, to Mark Maslin’s handy guide book How to Save our Planet, these enthralling new non-fiction titles have got you covered. Check out these titles and more, below!

Climate chaos : lessons on survival from our ancestors / Fagan, Brian M
“Man-made climate change may have began in the last two hundred years, but humankind has witnessed many eras of climate instability. The results have not always been pretty: once-mighty civilizations felled by pestilence and glacial melt and drought. But we have one powerful advantage as we face our current crisis: history. Climate Chaos is thus a book about saving ourselves. Brian Fagan and Nadia Durrani show in remarkable detail what it was like to battle our climate over centuries, and offer us a path to a safer and healthier future” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Wild souls : freedom and flourishing in the non-human world / Marris, Emma
“Are any animals truly wild on a planet that humans have so thoroughly changed? When is it right to capture or feed wild animals for the good of their species? Transporting readers into a field with scientists tackling profound challenges, Emma Marris offers a companionable tour of the philosophical ideas that may steer our search for sustainability and justice in the non-human world. Revealing just how intertwined animal life and human life really are, Wild Souls will change the way you think about nature – and our place within it.” (Adapted from Fishpond)

The nutmeg’s curse : parables for a planet in crisis / Ghosh, Amitav
“The Nutmeg’s Curse: Parables for a Planet in Crisis frames climate change and the Anthropocene as the culmination of a history. Ghosh makes the case that the political dynamics of climate change today are rooted in the centuries-old geopolitical order that was constructed by Western colonialism. Ghosh also writes explicitly against the backdrop of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Black Lives Matter protests, and other pressing issues, framing these ongoing crises in a new way by showing how the colonialist extractive mindset is directly connected to the deep inequality we see around us today.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

How to save our planet : the facts / Maslin, Mark
“How can we save our planet and survive the 21st century? How can you argue with deniers? How can we create positive change in the midst of the climate crisis? Professor Mark Maslin has the key facts that we need to protect our future. Global awareness of climate change is growing rapidly. Science has proven that our planet and species are facing a massive environmental crisis. How to Save Our Planet is a call to action, guaranteed to equip everyone with the knowledge needed to make change. — Provided by publisher.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Saving us : a climate scientist’s case for hope and healing in a divided world / Hayhoe, Katharine
“Called “one of the nation’s most effective communicators on climate change” by The New York Times, Katharine Hayhoe knows how to navigate all sides of the conversation on our changing planet. In Saving Us, Hayhoe argues that when it comes to changing hearts and minds, facts are only one part of the equation. We need to find shared values in order to connect our unique identities to collective action. This is not another doomsday narrative about a planet on fire. Saving Us leaves us with the tools to open a dialogue with your loved ones about how we all can play a role in pushing forward for change.”–Jacket.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

Wai Pasifika : indigenous ways in a changing climate / Young, David
“David Young focuses on the increasingly endangered resource of freshwater, and what so-called developed societies can learn from the Indigenous voices of the Pacific. Combining nineteenth century and Indigenous sources with a selection of modern studies and his own personal encounters, Young keeps a human face on the key issue of water. He confirms that the gift of Indigenous people to their colonisers is that they offer systematic and different concepts of being in, and experiencing, nature.” (Catalogue)

The arbornaut / Lowman, Margaret
“One of the world’s first tree-top scientists, Meg Lowman is as innovative as MacGuyver and as can-do as the Unsinkable Molly Brown. From climbing solo hundreds of feet into Australia’s rainforests to studying leaf-eaters in Scotland’s Highlands, Lowman launches us into the life and work of a field scientist and ecologist. She also offers hope, specific plans, and recommendations for action; despite devastation across the world, we can still make an immediate and lasting impact against climate change.” (Adapted from Catalogue)

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