New Zines!

The most recent Zinefest to be held in Wellington was in October 2020, and once again it was a big one. It was held over two days, this time at the Wellington Faculty of Architecture and Design Innovation, with different stallholders on both days. Most of our lending zine collection is bought at the Wellington Zinefests.

So where can you borrow our zines from? You can find them at three of our branches: Arapaki Manners Library, Newtown Library, and He Matapihi Molesworth Library at the National Library. Our zines are free to borrow for three weeks, and can be renewed for another three weeks.

Here are some selected zine highlights from the October 2020 Wellington Zinefest. These will be available for borrowing, so look out for them on our shelves.

Unsurprisingly, zines about quarantine and lockdown were a big theme this year: Miles Davitt created Quarantine Comix about the experience of being in quarantine in both Australia and New Zealand; Aotearoa: A Herd of 5 Million is exactly what its subtitle suggests: “a pictorial investigation into the collective consciousness of 21st century New Zealand (the farming colony)”; Humans in Lockdown is a satirical take on various personalities, and how they experienced lockdown, by Daniel Vernon; while Hamish Wilson’s An Airport Journal of remastered sketches has a section on Covid-19; lastly Els. continues her ongoing series Fancy Ladies Being Salty with a special lockdown edition as it applies to nineteenth century illustrations of fashion.

Another strong theme was zines about Wellington, and about birds in Wellington and New Zealand: Charlotte Page has written a small, short, black and white zine about being Gothic in Wellington, called Wellington Gothic; while David Coyle has written a collection of poems, a couple of which are devoted to Wellington, in Cuba Street and Other Poems. Catrina S. and James H. have collaborated on a tongue-in-cheek bird guide in their A Guide to Wellington Birds; while immigrant couple Zach Mandeville and Angelica Blevins have bravely created A Non-Native Guide to Native Birds.

Other themes include illustrated explorations of topics, such as death and sinning, by Davin Richardson in A Fright-ful Book About Death, and The Seven Deadly Sins respectively; and by Chantal Mcilraith in The Seven Deadly Stages of Procrastination. There were several delightful wordless, or nearly wordless, comics such as Moon Bandits, by Myrjam Van de Vijver, about an astronaut who finds that the moon is not as empty as she was expecting; and two about cats: Probable Claws by Chantal Mcilraith, about a very brave cat, and El Sueño del Gato by Abigail Sucsy, about what a cat gets up to at night while its person sleeps. There were also a couple of colouring-in books: Finding Karl by Eshant Gandhi, and Pigment of Your Imagination by Bhavya Ahuja.

Finally, we have a fanzine by Els. devoted to Carly Rae Jepson; Issue 4 of Overcommunicate, a “Magazine for LGBTQIA+ women, non-binary folk, gender diverse people, and friends”; Issue 73 of Incredibly Hot Sex With Hideous People by Bryce Galloway; a new instalment of Sock Review, this time reviewing the different options for supporting a broken ankle; and The Princess Bride told entirely in film stills and emojis by Willow Scarlett.