Kerry’s Fiction Picks

Syndetics book coverThis picture of you
Sarah Hopkins is an Australian author, former criminal lawyer and wife of chef Matt Moran (Masterchef fans will know who that is!)  This picture of you is her third novel and it sounds really good!  It centres around a family, a couple Maggie and Martin who have been married for 37 years, and their adult son.  When the Martin has a car accident one day and then is totally unable to recall why he was even there or what he was doing, Maggie takes it upon herself to find out what happened.  Martin meanwhile decides to relive what he can remember, regaling their son with the story of how the couple first met.  But all is not as it seems and secrets begin to unravel.  “This [is a] searing story of love and betrayal, and a family coming apart at the seams.  This Picture of You is urgent, gripping, insightful and intoxicating, an unforgettable journey into the heart of a family and the secrets that threaten to tear it apart” (Amazon US).

Syndetics book coverStrange gods
Author Annamaria Alfieri lives in New York City, but sets her novels in far off locations like South American and Africa.  Her latest is set in Nairobi in 1911 during the British East Africa era, and is described as “Out of Africa meets Agatha Christie”.  It’s a mystery/romance about well-bred Vera McIntosh, who is very interested in handsome police officer Justin Tolliver.  When her uncle is murdered with a tribesman spear the two set about investigating his death.  This leads them to the local tribes-people, a vengeful medicine man and a long list of suspects.  The is the first in a new series.

Syndetics book coverFriendship
Emily Gould is a former co-editor of Gawker and blogger and this is her debut novel.  It’s about two friends, Bev and Amy, who are two 20-something millenials living in New York City, approaching their 30s and starting to re-evaluate their lives.  When their good luck starts to change the two are forced to look at their lives, choices and relationship.   Booklist calls it a “savvy first novel that, in piercing prose, zeroes in on modern ennui and the catalysts that force even the most apathetic out of their complacency”.  (It has also been recommended by fashion-blogging star Garance Dore on her summer reading list).