New Zealand Music Month

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    NZMM: Favourite Wellington Music Moment – Jack Panther

    13.05.19 | Permalink | Comment? | By

    For NZ Music Month the last couple of years, we asked bands/artists for a favourite memory of making music in Wellington.

    It could involve a favourite gig, a funny story from the recording studio, a moment that led to the inspiration for a song, the fond recollection of a defunct venue, or the piece of music or lyric that they were most proud of creating.

    We really enjoyed the stories people told us, so we are doing it again this year.

    Next up is upcoming indie-pop artist Jack Panther, who writes ‘sad boi pop’ and has just released his debut E.P Retrospect.

    The track I’m proudest of from my debut EP is ‘Closer’. This took me around 5 years to write, from start to finish. I first wrote the chorus when I was around 15/16 years old and then finished writing the pre-chorus late last year. It only took me so long because I struggled to execute the tracks “vibe”.

    I was inspired by a night out going to one of my favourite events in Wellington; Eyegum at San Fran on a Wednesday night. Each week is something exciting and different. I’ve seen and discovered so many cool and amazing bands play over the years. I was inspired by an especially different Eyegum, where I had just started seeing someone, who at the time was about to leave the country. I guess you could say it was a bit tumultuous. The last act was finishing up and I got a text from him, saying “I’m outside”. I headed straight outside because at the time I was drunk, and may or may not have possibly been high.

    I stumbled out onto Marion Street where he stood, leaning against his motorbike; it was something like out of an 80s movie. Now, I knew he had a motorbike but I never thought I’d actually get to go on it.
    We exchanged hugs, he gave me his helmet, he sat down on the front and revved the engine. Still in awe, I sat down on the back, closed my eyes and held onto him. I had to take off my glasses to fit the helmet, so I was gripping on for dear life as we drove down Vivian Street, into the dead of night. It was such a thrill, passing all the street lights and I looked up into the sky, seeing a blur of what must’ve been a full moon.

    I think of that night fondly; I fully came to life – I probably just loved the feeling of danger.

    Lyrics:
    “I can’t replace it,
    Motorbike under the moon I’m holding onto ya,
    No I’m not gonna let go,
    It makes my heart shiver,
    It’s scared when we’re not together,
    But if I pull on ‘Closer’ to ya,
    Would you let it all go?”


  • General

    NZMM: Favourite Wellington Music Moment – Grayson Gilmour

    10.05.19 | Permalink | Comment? | By

    For NZ Music Month the last couple of years, we asked bands/artists for a favourite memory of making music in Wellington.

    It could involve a favourite gig, a funny story from the recording studio, a moment that led to the inspiration for a song, the fond recollection of a defunct venue, or the piece of music or lyric that they were most proud of creating.

    We really enjoyed the stories people told us, so we are doing it again this year.

    Next up is Grayson Gilmour, solo artist, band member and film composer. Starting with solo CD-Rs at 16, he formed So So Modern at 20 who, after seemingly endless tours around the globe, achieved an underground cult status for their unique electronic/post-punk sound, intense live shows, and ridiculous costumes. His solo releases caught the welcoming ears of critics over the years, and eventually the attention of NZ’s iconic Flying Nun Records, who made him the first signing of their 2010 re-launch. Since composing for film, Grayson has received awards for ‘Best Score’ at the NZ Film Awards for The Most Fun You Can Have Dying, and ‘Best Original Music’ for Consent at the APRA Silver Scrolls. While undertaking his Masters in Composition at the NZSM, Gg’s 2014 solo release, Infinite Life! was nominated for ‘Best Alternative Album’ at the NZ Music Awards, and the critics choice Taite Music Prize. Having released his latest album Otherness to critical acclaim, Gg is currently lecturing at Massey University’s College of Creative Arts in between film scoring projects and rare live performances.

    So So Modern played almost 400 shows across 21 countries, and it all began on an empty floor, in an inner city building, in Wellington central. Terrible landlords have a bad reputation, and rightly so, but sometimes their incompetence turns into opportunity for young and hungry artists. This was definitely the case with SSM — a floor to call our own; hang out together, skate, ride BMXs, jam and make music that would take us around the world.

    So So Modern’s first ever tele-feature with John Campbell shows the rehearsal space that Grayson talks about above.


  • General

    NZMM: Favourite Wellington Music Moment – Blue River Baby Band

    09.05.19 | Permalink | Comment? | By

    For NZ Music Month the last couple of years, we asked bands/artists for a favourite memory of making music in Wellington.

    It could involve a favourite gig, a funny story from the recording studio, a moment that led to the inspiration for a song, the fond recollection of a defunct venue, or the piece of music or lyric that they were most proud of creating.

    We really enjoyed the stories people told us, so we are doing it again this year.

    Up next is Cam from Blue River Baby Band, with a cool memory of taking their music outside Wellington to a bigger audience.

    A Favorite memory for me would be playing NYE in Nelson, and watching a sea of 20,000 people dancing and moving in unison to our music, a totally euphoric and humbling surreal experience, we all had smiles for a few days after that. There’s nothing like the buzz of playing live, 1,000 x better than any drug out there.


  • General

    NZMM: Favourite Wellington Music Moment – DEAF

    08.05.19 | Permalink | Comment? | By

    For NZ Music Month the last couple of years, we asked bands/artists for a favourite memory of making music in Wellington.

    It could involve a favourite gig, a funny story from the recording studio, a moment that led to the inspiration for a song, the fond recollection of a defunct venue, or the piece of music or lyric that they were most proud of creating.

    We really enjoyed the stories people told us, so we are doing it again this year.

    Next up is Luke from DEAF, a Wellington Postpunk band formed in 2018. The band were handpicked to open for Peter Murphy and David J from goth legends Bauhaus and have opened for Jesus and The Mary Chain & Drab Majesty.

    One of the best musical memories I’ve had is playing Wellington’s now sorely missed Mighty Mighty.
    The shows that you would play there were so shambolically brilliant and there was a great sense of community there. There’s been a cavernous space in Wellington’s musical landscape ever since it’s demise.


  • General

    NZMM: Favourite Wellington Music Moment – Wallace

    07.05.19 | Permalink | Comment? | By

    For NZ Music Month the last couple of years, we asked bands/artists for a favourite memory of making music in Wellington.

    It could involve a favourite gig, a funny story from the recording studio, a moment that led to the inspiration for a song, the fond recollection of a defunct venue, or the piece of music or lyric that they were most proud of creating.

    We really enjoyed the stories people told us, so we are doing it again this year.

    Next up is future-soul singer Wallace. Wallace Gollan spent her early years in New Zealand, and still has strong memories for her hometown of Wellington. Now based in Sydney she has won a swag of glowing reviews from international taste makers and publications; high profile international supports such as Slum Village; winning the JJJ unearthed Listen Out slot for Sydney; high profile playlist adds on spotify and collaborations with acclaimed international acts such as Kraak and Smaak and outstanding Australian peers such as Sampa the Great. Her latest track Pantone Home is essentially a walk through the duck egg blue house she grew up in, where everything in the song is 100% true.

    “Wow, what a voice… Just good soul music” – Gilles Peterson

    Wellington is so special to me, my heart has been growing fonder and fonder over the past 7 years I’ve been away. I’ve actually written two songs about our little harbour city. ‘Pantone Home’, which I released last year, takes you on a tour through the colourful house I grew up in high in the hills of Brooklyn.
    The other track Ae Fond Kiss is waiting in the wings to be released later this year. It’s inspired (and named after) a Scottish folk song my dad used to sing to me and also features our fierce Wellington wind.


  • General

    NZMM: Favourite Wellington Music Moment – Liam Poole

    03.05.19 | Permalink | Comment? | By

    For NZ Music Month the last couple of years, we asked bands/artists for a favourite memory of making music in Wellington.

    It could involve a favourite gig, a funny story from the recording studio, a moment that led to the inspiration for a song, the fond recollection of a defunct venue, or the piece of music or lyric that they were most proud of creating.

    We really enjoyed the stories people told us, so we are doing it again this year.

    First up this time is Liam Poole, a singer-songwriter originally from Nelson but now based in Wellington. He gigs regularly around town at the Night Market & various bars, and was part of the recent Cuba Dupa Festival. He currently has 2 EP’s on Spotify and iTunes: Fly High EP & Wake Up EP.

    My fondest musical memory was creating my ‘Wake Up EP’ in an intimate basement studio. In particular, watching two pros, my Producer, Mark McKenzie, and the saxophonist, Simon Williams create the incredible Saxophone stabs for the track ‘Change Me’ from scratch.

     


  • General

    NZMM: Favourite Wellington Music Moment – Flo Wilson

    23.05.18 | Permalink | Comment? | By

    For NZ Music Month the last couple of years, we asked bands/artists for a favourite memory of making music in Wellington.

    It could involve a favourite gig, a funny story from the recording studio, a moment that led to the inspiration for a song, the fond recollection of a defunct venue, or the piece of music or lyric that they were most proud of creating.

    We really enjoyed the stories people told us, so we are doing it again this year.

    Next up is Flo Wilson.

    One of my favourite memories of Wellington music was now destroyed Munki Studios; it was a concrete building off Taranaki St run by Mike Gibson that was formerly run by the NZ Secret Service. My favourite part of that space was walking into the drum room which was once the vault! You felt like you were performing in history. Mike was also one of the only male studio engineers I’d come across in my early years as a musician who also pointed out blatant sexism/ gendering of studio equipment. Awesome guy!


  • General

    NZMM: Favourite Wellington Music Moment – Ghost Who Walks

    21.05.18 | Permalink | Comment? | By

    For NZ Music Month the last couple of years, we asked bands/artists for a favourite memory of making music in Wellington.

    It could involve a favourite gig, a funny story from the recording studio, a moment that led to the inspiration for a song, the fond recollection of a defunct venue, or the piece of music or lyric that they were most proud of creating.

    We really enjoyed the stories people told us, so we are doing it again this year.

    Next up is Ghost Who Walks.

    I remember headlining a gig at Bad Grannies with Free the Cats and the Dead Zephyrs in January of last year with Josh Brown on drums, Kirill Podzorov on keys, and Joeseph Bulbilia on bass. The place was pumping, had a great atmosphere you know, when I happened to notice none other than Neil Billington had popped in to join us for a tune or two. So we invited him up on stage and preceeded to have to this day one of the best jam sessions I’ve been involved in. The place went nuts. It was a great honour to share the stage with a top player like Neil. A great memory.


  • General

    NZMM: Favourite Wellington Music Moment – Charlotte Yates

    17.05.18 | Permalink | Comment? | By

    For NZ Music Month the last couple of years, we asked bands/artists for a favourite memory of making music in Wellington.

    It could involve a favourite gig, a funny story from the recording studio, a moment that led to the inspiration for a song, the fond recollection of a defunct venue, or the piece of music or lyric that they were most proud of creating.

    We really enjoyed the stories people told us, so we are doing it again this year.

    Next up is Charlotte Yates.

    I’m playing a show at the Third Eye in Arthur St on the 19th. Now a brewery ( downstairs) /venue ( upstairs) but way back, it was the studio and rehearsal space for Wellington alt-jazzsters the Six Volts, three of whom who ultimately morphed into the film composing phenomenon Plan 9. Downstairs was a picture framing business, Exhibit A owned by the tolerant and music loving Dave Strauss. There was one green telephone in the building ( downstairs). The Volts’ rehearsal space was used by many local musos and dustily full of eclectic instruments and band gear. The wooden stairs was grooved by eons of feet clambering up. When the phone rang for anyone but the picture framer, he would gamely trudge up the stairs, open the rehearsal room door and wordlessly thrust a large cardboard sign with the relevant musician’s name on it to take the call. How it all worked relatively painlessly for so long its hard to fathom, but pre cell phones and digital workstations, downloads and instagram, it was a convivial place to learn the trade of ‘band’.


  • General

    NZMM: Favourite Wellington Music Moment – Transistor

    14.05.18 | Permalink | Comment? | By

    For NZ Music Month the last couple of years, we asked bands/artists for a favourite memory of making music in Wellington.

    It could involve a favourite gig, a funny story from the recording studio, a moment that led to the inspiration for a song, the fond recollection of a defunct venue, or the piece of music or lyric that they were most proud of creating.

    We really enjoyed the stories people told us, so we are doing it again this year.

    Next up is Lochie from Transistor.

    One great memory that always sticks with me is when we had the massive honour of supporting Black Mountain (Canadian psych band), alongside Dave Weir, at the amazing Bodega Bar back in 2016. It was one of our first gigs funnily enough, and we were completely terrified by it all at that point. To us, Black Mountain are this legendary band that you watch on KEXP and listen to on record, and to see them setting up for soundcheck and all that was completely surreal. That night taught us a bunch of great lessons, one being that you don’t have to be stuck up and act overly important to be a successful artist (if that makes any sense). They were all insanely welcoming and kind to us, when they didn’t have to be at all, and they played the best set ever to a packed out amazing venue. It was a massive eye opener to see how relaxed and professional everyone was that night.


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