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  • General

    The Eighth Note/New E.P – Orangefarm

    20.07.18 | Permalink | Comment?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ‘The Eighth Note’ is 8 quick Questions with Wellington Musicians.

    A chance for us to catch up with people & see what they’re up to, or introduce you to a new musician/band and their music.

    ‘New EP’ is where a band or artist answers some questions about their latest release.

    Today’s guest is Nigel from Orangefarm, who have just released a new E.P.

     

    Who are you? Tell us a bit about your music:
    We’re an indie rock band, based in Wellington. Our music is really focused on the song. Our sound has been described as, ‘cinematic,’ and ‘intimate jangle pop’ by various friends and critics. The line up consists of the usual guitar (Nigel Mitchell), drums (Karen Apperley,) and bass (Celia McAlpine), but we also are lucky enough to have the wonderfully talented Vivien Reid and her French horn. Viv also plays keyboards and percussion and adds her voice to mine and Celia’s.

    What have you been working on lately? Any new tracks or albums on the way?
    The main thing we’re working on is preparing for our EP release party at Moon on July 21st. We’re super excited about that and we want to make it the best show we’ve ever done. We’ve also got a spot on NZ Live with Jesse Mulligan on August 3rd.

    When/where was the new EP recorded?
    Recording actually started in November 2016 at Blue Barn in Newtown. Our sound engineer produced one of the tracks, but he got too busy to do the others so we just sat on them for about a year until I decided to go back to Blue Barn in March of this year and get them done.

    Who produced/engineered the EP? How did the tracks come together in the studio, or at home?
    The brilliant James Goldsmith engineered and ended up producing the songs. We had them written and rehearsed before we went into the studio.

    Did the shorter format of an EP give you the option to experiment in any way with your sound or with different forms of song-writing?
    Not really. It was just all we could afford.

    Was there any specific gear you used to capture that?
    No.

    Is there a particular track or theme that the EP was formed around?
    The songs are mostly reflections on identity and loss, stemming from my parents experience of the Christchurch earthquake. Although they’re not ‘earthquake songs’ that’s kind of the event that formed the images and lines in the lyrics. ‘8 Things’ is the exception. I wrote that about 19 years ago but it seemed to fit with the others and we know, from performing that people like it.

    Where do you see the EPs place in growing an audience online? Do you see it as a progression towards an album or a separate entity?
    Yes. We’d love to record an album next. We’re just learning about growing an audience, and it seems that online and live performance are both essential ingredients.

    Which digital platforms is it available on?
    Pretty much all of them.

    Are you doing any gigs or promotion for its release?
    21st July at Moon, plus our slot on Jesse Mulligan’s show, August 3rd. We’ve sent it to a number of student radio stations too, so hopefully one or two of them will play it.

    Where is the best place people can follow you & find your music?
    We can be found on Facebook, Bandcamp and our Website.

    What were the 3 most influential albums to you growing up?
    This is a good one! I’m 52, so some of the albums will be from the dark ages, especially to our 22 year old bass player! I was a big Queen fan when I was a kid, and the first album I bought was their first, self titled one. I listened to it constantly and tried to sing like Freddie Mercury. David Bowie’s Scary Monsters was also a fave when I was in high school, largely for Robert Fripp’s unbelievable guitar playing. The third one would probably be The Bats, Daddy’s Highway. Still a personal favourite.

    Which other Wellington musician (s) would you most like to work with?
    Grayson Gilmour is just a genius. Not sure if our sound would work on a double bill with him, but he’s amazing anyway. We’ve played with our friends Let’s Planet a couple of times. They’re very cool. We’d also love to do a set with Phoenix Foundation.

    What’s your favourite Wellington venue to play in?
    Moon is becoming our go to venue. So friendly and good to work with. It’s really cosy and the pizza is good.

    In your songwriting or composing (or the band’s songwriting) how do the compositions and songs take shape?
    I usually write the songs and upload demos to Soundcloud our something to share with the others. Karen adds amazing drum magic and Celia figures out some bass, unless I’ve written a baseline, by our next practice. Viv will also come up with some ideas and we’ll go from there. ‘The Water’ and another one we haven’t recorded started with Karen’s drums and built from there. Another new one came out of a jam between Karen, Celia and me.

    Where/when is your next gig?
    July 21, at Moon in Newtown.


  • General

    The Eighth Note/New Album: Wellington Sea Shanty Society

    13.07.18 | Permalink | Comment?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ‘The Eighth Note’ is 8 quick Questions with Wellington Musicians.

    A chance for us to catch up with people & see what they’re up to, or introduce you to a new musician/band and their music.

    ‘New Album’ is where a band or artist answers some questions about their latest release.

    Today’s guest is Lake from the Wellington Sea Shanty Society, who have just released a new album in collaboration with Croche Dedans.

     

    Who are you? Tell us a bit about your music:
    The Wellington Sea Shanty Society. Strictly shanties.

    What have you been working on lately? Any new tracks or albums on the way?
    We have just released our French/English collab with Croche Dedans called Ahoy!

    When/where was the new album recorded?
    In April 2017 we recorded the album at a great community recording studio in Vannes, just outside Nantes, France.

    Who produced/engineered the album? How did the tracks come together in the studio, or at home?
    Gaëtan Griveau engineered the album then I (Lake) mixed it back in my bedroom in Toronto. This is a joint album with our French friends Croche Dedans so we didn’t have much time get ready for the studio. We chose the tracks to record over e-mail then had a couple of jams before we started recording.

    How did the songwriting happen? Are there any overall themes within the songs/album?
    These are mainly traditional sea shanties. Vorn wrote the one original shanty.
    The history of Wellington Sea Shanty Society and Croche Dedans are as intertwined as a heaving line knot. After learning the way of the chant marin from Croche in Nantes, circa 2012, I returned to Aotearoa NZ to found a shanty group of my own. Vorn Dont Pere Etait Marin was the only squeeze box player in town, and he was keen, so the Wellington Sea Shanty Society was born!
    In 2014 Croche Dedans made their way down to the South Pacific for our first joint shanty tour. In 2015 we joined forces again for a tour of Bretagne.
    Over the years Croche & WSSS have created what has come to be known as the ‘troisieme set’. After playing a set each, we crowd onto the stage and engage in a shanty battle: French verse vs. English verse, Kiwi squeezebox vs. Breton banjo. This album is us attempting to bottle this salty energy.

    Were you going for a different sound/approach on this album?
    Not really. It’s a little more ‘straight up shanty’ compared to our other albums. We just use the instruments we play live.

    Is there a particular single/track that you feel captures the essence of the album?
    La Complainte Des Terres Neuva/The Men of the Grand Banks’ Cry: The W.S.S.S usually do this one in French when we’re in New Zealand but we translated it to English on the train from Paris to Nantes. I think the switching between languages works really well. I also love the defiance of this shanty.

    Is there a physical copy available? If not which digital platforms is it available on?
    Yes. Physical copies can be ordered from our Bandcamp page.

    Are you working on a video/videos for any of the songs? Are you doing any gigs or promotion for its release?
    We have one video, and a couple of live videos of tracks that appear on the album. The W.S.S.S will be back performing in and around Wellington from September! For the full W.S.S.S + Croche Dedans experience you’ll have to wait for the next time we can French to travel south.

    Where is the best place people can follow you & find your music?
    Twitter, Facebook & our Website.

    What were the 3 most influential albums to you growing up?
    In my lifetime as a shanty singer:
    Croche Dedans: Ostrava
    The Corries: Live from Scotland
    New Zealand Folk Songs by Neil Colquhoun (This is a book)

    Which other Wellington musician (s) would you most like to work with?
    Anyone with a shanty disposition.

    What’s your favourite Wellington venue to play in?
    Sprig & Fern Tinakori Rd & the Southern Cross.

    In your songwriting or composing (or the band’s songwriting) how do the compositions and songs take shape?
    We normally write alone. Then workshop things together.

    Where/when is your next gig?
    TBC!!


  • General

    The Eighth Note: Ingrid & The Ministers

    11.07.18 | Permalink | Comment?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ‘The Eighth Note’ is 8 quick Questions with Wellington Musicians.

    A chance for us to catch up with people & see what they’re up to, or introduce you to a new musician/band and their music.

    Today’s guest is Ingrid Saker, who is the leader of new band Ingrid and the Ministers.

     

    Who are you? Tell us a bit about your music:
    I’m the Ingrid in Ingrid and the Ministers. I wrote my first song when I was 13 and had just started learning guitar. I taught myself how to play because I was too busy with other things to have any lessons. Girls also weren’t really encouraged to learn guitar where I’m from, so for years I was terrified of performing in front of people even though I wanted to. A lot of my music now comes from a place of reclaiming my voice and my right to make sounds. I love starting really quietly and building to a massive climax. I call my music psychedelic frock music because I love rock bands like Pink Floyd and The Velvet Underground but I’m also heavily influenced by female folk-y musicians like Laura Marling, Nadia Reid, Sharon Van Etten.

    What have you been working on lately? Any new tracks or albums on the way? Any new tracks or albums on the way?
    I’ve just recorded a debut EP with the band.

    Where is the best place people can follow you & find your music?
    Facebook definitely.

    What were the 3 most influential albums to you growing up?
    Laura Marling ‘Alas I Cannot Swim’.
    Neil Young ‘After The Goldrush’
    The Beatles ‘Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’

    Which other Wellington musician (s) would you most like to work with?
    Ebony from Eb and Sparrow and Charlotte Forrester from Womb.

    What’s your favourite Wellington venue to play in?
    San Fran I think.

    In your songwriting or composing (or the band’s songwriting) how do the compositions and songs take shape?
    I normally write the songs on my own with a guitar and then bring them to the band and we jam them out. Sometimes the structure can change a fair bit with the band.

    Where/when is your next gig?
    I’m doing a solo acoustic session at Bats Theatre on Saturday 14th July. 9:15pm! Next full band gig is TBC but coming soon!


  • General

    The Eighth Note: Miromiro

    10.07.18 | Permalink | Comment?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ‘The Eighth Note’ is 8 quick Questions with Wellington Musicians.

    A chance for us to catch up with people & see what they’re up to, or introduce you to a new musician/band and their music.

    Today’s guest is Ashok Jacob, who makes Electronica music under the moniker Miromiro.

     

    Who are you? Tell us a bit about your music:
    I’m Ashok, I make downtempo IDM and electronica as Miromiro. I’m a history and geography student which is a big influence on my music. It’s heavily inspired by environment, both natural and manmade.

    What have you been working on lately? Any new tracks or albums on the way?
    I just put out an album called Prachanda Path, but I’m always working on new stuff. Plus, I’m also working on the soundtrack for an upcoming RPG coming out of Canada, which is very exciting.

    Where is the best place people can follow you & find your music?
    You can find my music on my Bandcamp page, but it’s also on Spotify and loads of other streaming services. If you really want to you can follow me on twitter @miromironz, although I wouldn’t if I were you.

    What were the 3 most influential albums to you growing up?
    The album that had the biggest effect on me as a kid was probably Lemon Jelly’s debut album KY. In my early teens I started listening to more intense electronica, so second would be Boards of Canada’s Geogaddi. Third would probably be Snivilisation by Orbital, which is where I found my love of sampling vintage media.

    Which other Wellington musician (s) would you most like to work with?
    Rhian Sheehan!

    What’s your favourite Wellington venue to play in?
    I’ve not played live yet, so I don’t know.

    In your songwriting or composing (or the band’s songwriting) how do the compositions and songs take shape?
    Generally I start with a single element that I really like, whether it be a melody, some chords or a drum pattern, then I build everything else around that. I don’t usually have a final goal or an idea of what I want it to sound like at the end, I just sort of meander around different sounds until I’m satisfied.

    Where/when is your next gig?
    I don’t know! I don’t have any particular plans to start playing live, although I am interested in doing so.


  • General

    The Eighth Note: Louis Thompson-Munn

    05.07.18 | Permalink | Comment?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ‘The Eighth Note’ is 8 quick Questions with Wellington Musicians.

    A chance for us to catch up with people & see what they’re up to, or introduce you to a new musician/band and their music.

    Today’s guest is pianist/vocalist Louis Thompson-Munn, who is involved in various Musical projects.

    Who are you? Tell us a bit about your music:
    I’m a Wellington based piano/vocalist, currently I’ve just completed a NZ tour with my jazz trio Ol’ King Cole – though you can probably catch me playing around town with a variety of different bands.

    What have you been working on lately? Any new tracks or albums on the way?
    Just before going away on tour I released an album with my trio Ol’ King Cole of some works of the great Nat King Cole’s trio. I’ve also been working with a few other groups with hopefully some new music on the way – The Fades, Moira Jean, Wellington City Shake-em-on-Downers & Neo Hot Jive Orchestra to name a few.

    Where is the best place people can follow you & find your music?
    Facebook is probably the best way to keep up with the bands I play in with, though I sometime keep my Website updated! Haha

    What were the 3 most influential albums to you growing up?
    Way to many to name! Haha – though I was influenced by a number of things. My Mum grew up a little in the USA & Canada so I got a lot of the jazz cannon home that way with my Pop also playing piano and singing these tunes. But on the other hand Dad grew up with the Rolling Stones and the Pink Floyd etc. so a variety of music! If it sounds good to you, it’s good!

    Which other Wellington musician (s) would you most like to work with?
    Again, way too many to name! We’re very lucky to have such amazing talent in this city, and country!

    What’s your favourite Wellington venue to play in?
    There’s always great vibes in every venue but the Rogue & Vagabond is always a great time! And they have a piano there so it makes my life easy most of the time ;-P

    In your songwriting or composing (or the band’s songwriting) how do the compositions and songs take shape?
    This can vary of course depending on who I’m working with, but songs/compositions can take shape in many ways. Sometimes you’ll have someone with some chord progressions or a riff to work from, then you can jam those out to find a melody organically. But you can also go the other way and have lyrics and maybe a melody first. Sometimes someone will just write a tune from head to toe as well, so it’s always pretty different.

    Where/when is your next gig?
    Thursday I’m playing with a funk trio at Rogue & Vagabond, 9:30pm.
    Friday at Rogue again with the Moira Jean band, 9:30pm.
    Sunday night at The Library, 8:30pm with Oscar Laven (sax) & Hikurangi Schaverien-Kaa (drums) playing organ trio


  • General

    The Eighth Note: O-Boy!

    26.06.18 | Permalink | Comment?


     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ‘The Eighth Note’ is 8 quick Questions with Wellington Musicians.

    A chance for us to catch up with people & see what they’re up to, or introduce you to a new musician/band and their music.

    Today’s guest is Bianca from the band O-Boy, who have recently re-located to Wgtn.

     

    Who are you? Tell us a bit about your music:
    We are Bryony Roberts and Bianca Bailey, a grunge rock band, originally from Auckland, now based in Wellington.

    What have you been working on lately? Any new tracks or albums on the way?
    At the moment we’re just getting back into playing, hopefully will be writing and recording some new stuff soon!

    Where is the best place people can follow you & find your music?
    You can find us on Facebook under O-Boy and on Spotify and Bandcamp under O-Boy! (We like having the ! in our name but for some reason FB doesn’t let us have it :().

    What were the 3 most influential albums to you growing up?
    You’re a Women I’m a Machine – Death From Above 1979, Elephant – The White Stripes and Fuzz – Fuzz.

    Which other Wellington musician (s) would you most like to work with?
    Memaidens, Onono, Louisa, we could go on, there are so many talented artists in Wellington.

    What’s your favourite Wellington venue to play in?
    So far we’ve only played a few venues, being Caroline, Meow and Parrotdog Bar and they’ve all been a blast, Parrotdog bar was definitely a wicked experience.

    In your songwriting or composing (or the bandís songwriting) how do the compositions and songs take shape?
    Most of the time is starts with a bass line, or a set of lyrics, we work part by part working on and intro or a verse, or a few different sections before figuring out how they al fit in together mostly. Or we just roll with whatever comes 😛

    Where/when is your next gig?
    Our next gig in on the 29th June, we’re opening for Earth Tongue at Valhalla.


  • General

    The Eighth Note: Bad Friend

    22.06.18 | Permalink | Comment?


     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ‘The Eighth Note’ is 8 quick Questions with Wellington Musicians.

    A chance for us to catch up with people & see what they’re up to, or introduce you to a new musician/band and their music.

    Today’s guest is Taylor from Bad Friend, who have just released their debut E.P.

    Who are you? Tell us a bit about your music:
    Bad Friend is made up of good friends Emma, Victoria, Zac and Taylor. We started playing together really gently fleshing out these really lush, simple, short & sad pop songs that Emma had. Because we all had this shared affection & affinity for emo & pop-punk, it kinda organically got louder & noisey-er & I guess more fun.

    What have you been working on lately? Any new tracks or albums on the way?
    To be honest, we have been working hard & focusing on getting the E.P out, which is made up of some pretty old material. Once that is done, we are going to be writing new material, but it could be a little while away.

    Where is the best place people can follow you & find your music?
    Facebook & Bandcamp at this point.

    What were the 3 most influential albums to you growing up?
    I’m not sure if I could confidently find the ‘most influential’ for all us, so we each gave a fav and then one we come back to as a group;
    The Same Old Blood Rush With A New Touch – Cute Is What We Aim For
    A Different Arrangement – Black Marble
    The Love Below – Andre 300
    Loveless – My Bloody Valentine
    &<3 From Under the Cork Tree – Fall Out Boy <3

    Which other Wellington musician (s) would you most like to work with?
    We had a really nice time working with Jules from Soda Boys when he filled in for Zac, so maybe something for intentional & considered with him.

    What’s your favourite Wellington venue to play in?
    We have been really lucky to play a few shows at some of friends flats, especially in our early days. These are always a treat!

    In your songwriting or composing (or the band’s songwriting) how do the compositions and songs take shape?
    Often someone will bring forward most of a finished song, although it might just be the guitar part and lyrics. We try to be collaborative as much as possible, everyone writing their own parts and feeling good about that. We don’t really write together spontaneously too often, although it was how one song on the E.P came about, so that might be a bigger part of it going forward.

    Where/when is your next gig?
    At this point we don’t have anything booked, so watch this space.


  • General

    The Eighth Note: Maxwell Young

    21.06.18 | Permalink | Comment?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ‘The Eighth Note’ is 8 quick Questions with Wellington Musicians.

    A chance for us to catch up with people & see what they’re up to, or introduce you to a new musician/band and their music.

    Today’s guest is bedroom producer Maxwell Young.

    Who are you? Tell us a bit about your music:
    My name is Maxwell Young. I make music independently in my bedroom. Most of it stems from experiences of anxiety and heartbreak. My music is interestingly most listened to in major international cities like New York, London, Los Angeles and has now collectively over ten million plays.

    What have you been working on lately? Any new tracks or albums on the way?
    I have my first self produced album “Daydreamer” releasing on July 18th. It’s the most work I’ve ever put into a project and I’m really excited for it to finally come out. I see it as more of a diary than an album because it’s really personal and relatively rough around the edges but I’m proud of it for that fact.

    Where is the best place people can follow you & find your music?
    You can hear my music wherever you listen to music on the internet [Soundcloud] and you can follow me at on Instagram to keep up to date with what I have going on as well as whatever other social media you prefer.

    What were the 3 most influential albums to you growing up?
    Wolfgang Amadeus Phoenix by Phoenix, Vampire Weekend’s Self Titled & A Rush of Blood to the Head by Coldplay. There’s so many more but I hold these very close to my heart and think they’ve influenced my sound a lot. These albums all have originality, flair and really clever songwriting within the bounds of creating commercial, structured Popular music. I’d like to strike that balance as well as those bands did with those projects one day.

    Which other Wellington musician (s) would you most like to work with?
    Right now I’m working on music with my friend Tom Verberne who I met doing the Massey Commercial Music Course and would like to record a lot of other musicians I’ve met there. That’s something I’m looking forward to doing more on the project after Daydreamer. Orchestrating others to follow my vision rather than realising it all myself.

    What’s your favourite Wellington venue to play in?
    San Fran is the one I’ve played in the most, my first show opening for the LA band The Internet was there. I really like how it’s narrow. Makes it fun to be on stage and look out. Although I’d like to perform at quite a few more venues really, I’m still relatively new to live performance.

    In your songwriting or composing (or the band’s songwriting) how do the compositions and songs take shape?
    It’s different every time. I’m always writing lyrics and recording melody ideas on my phone. Often it starts with guitar chords as it’s the easiest songwriting tool for me but I’m trying to start with melody before chords so I can make more memorable melodies. But it’s really just a matter of me making a musical moment that feels full by messing around with adding layers until the loop feels colourful and then creating the developed structure and writing to it.

    Where/when is your next gig?
    I’m playing my first headline show at Caroline on the 21st of July (this Thursday). I really don’t know what to expect but have been looking forward to doing my own show for a long time. Tom Verberne who I mentioned earlier and Josie Moon will be opening.


  • General

    The Eighth Note: The Heathen Collective

    18.06.18 | Permalink | Comment?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ‘The Eighth Note’ is 8 quick Questions with Wellington Musicians.

    A chance for us to catch up with people & see what they’re up to, or introduce you to a new musician/band and their music.

    Today’s guest is The Heathen Collective.

    Who are you? Tell us a bit about your music:
    The Heathen Collective are: Aaron “Goose” Gunn / Vocals, Rowan Reidy / Guitar, Dhanesh Parmar / Guitar, Daniel Palmer / Bass, Sarah Scanlan / Drums.
    Our music is a mash up of different sub genres of heavy music. We try our best to write music that is filled with groove with a very slight hint of progressive elements. The lyrics are mainly written about corruption and life experience. With that said, we don’t take ourselves too seriously. We like to have fun onstage and turn our live shows into a comedy show of sorts. The way we see it, if we don’t enjoy ourselves neither will the crowd. Its all about the Rock ‘n’ Lolz!

    What have you been working on lately? Any new tracks or albums on the way?
    We have recently re-recorded and re-released our first full length album “Reflective”. In the next few months we will be re-recording the leftover tracks from the original recording sessions for Reflective and releasing them as an E.P. We are also working on songs for the next album which we are hoping to start recording before the end of the year.

    Where is the best place people can follow you & find your music?
    Facebook is where you can keep up to date with gigs, releases etc.
    Our music is available on Bandcamp for purchase and streaming. But we also have our videos and music on Youtube.

    What were the 3 most influential albums to you growing up?
    There is a lot more than 3 albums but the 3 albums that have influenced the sound of our music the most in one way or another are:
    Master of Reality – Black Sabbath, Chaos A.D – Sepultura, The Shape of Punk to Come – Refused.

    Which other Wellington musician (s) would you most like to work with?
    We are hoping to get Brendan Kent (Kairillion Theory) and Ngarewa Reid (Order of Diptera) to guest on one of our recordings in the near future.

    What’s your favourite Wellington venue to play in?
    It has always has been and always will be Valhalla.

    In your songwriting or composing (or the band’s songwriting) how do the compositions and songs take shape?
    Usually it starts with Aaron writing the skeleton of the song which he then shows to the band to get their opinion. Once the song is accepted, the band learns it and adjust their parts to their own personal styles. Other times an idea is triggered by Dhanesh which Aaron will then take and turn into a song.

    Where/when is your next gig?
    Our next show is in Auckland at the Ding Dong Lounge on Saturday July 7th.


  • General

    The Eighth Note: Neverwoz

    14.06.18 | Permalink | Comment?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ‘The Eighth Note’ is 8 quick Questions with Wellington Musicians.

    A chance for us to catch up with people & see what they’re up to, or introduce you to a new musician/band and their music.

    Today’s guest is Peter from Neverwoz.

    Who are you? Tell us a bit about your music:
    We are a band comprised of songwriter Peter Baillie, and as many talented musicians as he can gather together at any one time. Twelve people contributed to the album, and we’ll play with whatever combination of instruments that we can fit on a stage. This means that in addition to the usual guitars and keyboards, the album features double bass, clarinet, trumpet, bass trombone, accordion and a whistle. Oh, and cowbell of course.
    Peter’s determination to avoid playing only one style of music means we are a ‘Pop-Folk-Country-Reggae-Soul-Blues-Rock-Hip-Hop’ act. It’s a credit to the skills of all the musicians involved that we can play so many genres. For Peter, the best feeling in the world is to write a song which gets stuck in the listener’s head, and it’s a special feeling to watch people sing along when we get to the choruses!

    What have you been working on lately? Any new tracks or albums on the way?
    We have recently completed our debut album, Minor Words and Major Thirds. There’s an album launch party in the works (watch this space) comprising 12 of Peter’s songs. He has another 80 or so he’ll get around to releasing eventually!

    Where is the best place people can follow you & find your music?
    Check out our Website for upcoming gigs, or you can find us on Facebook. We put out an animated music video last year called Hollow Man, animated by Jeremy Jones of Propeller Motion – who worked with blues legend Darren Watson on his controversial ‘Planet Key’ video.

    What were the 3 most influential albums to you growing up?
    Very tricky question, but I’m going to pick these three:
    The Navigator by Che Fu, for its beautiful blend of soul vocals with hip-hop and pop sensibility. Every New Zealander should own a copy of this album.
    Together Alone by Crowded House, as the pinnacle of Neil Finn’s amazing songwriting craft and a record which reminds me of home anytime I’m out of the country. If you get the chance to visit Kare Kare, play this album while you’re driving there.
    Revolver by The Beatles is everything pop music should be – succinct, surprising, and as multi-faceted and brilliant as a diamond. The best pop music makes you forget what came before, or what’s coming next – who else could place ‘Yellow Submarine’ between ‘Here There and Everywhere’ and ‘She Said She Said’? Our album is an attempt to create twelve different moods and styles which will take you to twelve different places.

    Which other Wellington musician (s) would you most like to work with?
    There are plenty. Chris Winter (Mr Winter), the producer of our album is a strong contender – aside from being a wizard in the studio he’s also a phenomenal multi-instrumentalist. Vorn Colgan of the Vorn band has been a hero for years, creating world-class songs on a shoestring budget.
    My favourite Wellington band was called OdESSA – sadly broken up, but they were undoubtedly the most viscerally exciting band to see live, with shows that could run for three hours. If you can find a copy of Oak Park Avenue, their debut album, you can get a sense of how great Wellington music can be. In addition to these, there are so many acts you should be seeing and supporting: April Fish, Eb and Sparrow, The Gracious Deviants, Julie Lamb, Merrin and Band of Crooks are all friends and heroes to the band. Support local music!

    What’s your favourite Wellington venue to play in?
    San Fran, definitely. Ziggy and the gang are great people, they always make an effort to provide good sound, and the vibe of the bar on a good night is spectacular. They also do a lot of heavy lifting in supporting local music.

    In your songwriting or composing (or the band’s songwriting) how do the compositions and songs take shape?
    Peter’s songs come from all sorts of spaces and stories – somewhere between fiction and truth and usually self-deprecating, often built around near-impossible rhymes or terrible puns. The one hard and fast rule is that every song has to sound distinctive from the ones around it, and be memorable for days afterwards. He packs in as many hooks and catchy choruses as possible, and then tries to find people more talented than him to play them. What comes out is greater than the sum of its parts.

    Where/when is your next gig?
    Neverwoz returns to the San Fran stage to promote the new album on Jun 29th! Joined by our friends The Interns and Ingrid and the Ministers for a massive celebration of folk, funk, rock, country, hip hop, pop and Mac users. Entry is a mere $10 so don’t miss a great night of music.

    Hollow Man from Peter Baillie on Vimeo.


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