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    New Album: Andrew Masseurs

    15.07.19 | Permalink | Comment? | By

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ‘New Album’ is where a band or artist answers some questions about their latest release. Last year AMMP front-man Andrew Masseurs ventured into solo territory with his debut album Origins. While there were plenty of standout tracks, there was also a sense of someone figuring out production and music styles, trying different things and finding his way as a solo act. Two hugely catchy singles in March & May of this year were one of those rare instances where the leap in production techniques, vocals, confidence, and artistic growth jumps right out of the music at you. Second album ‘Traveller in the Sky’ was just released to uniformly positive reviews from Muzic.net & Graham Reid’s Elsewhere, and two future singles, ‘Night After Night’ & ‘Days They Come Days They Go’ have made the 2019 unsigned competition semi-finals out of 6000 entries. We caught up with Andrew for a chat about how it all came together.

     

    When/where was the new album recorded?
    Traveller in the Sky was made between Feb 2018 and June 2019 at my home studio in the greatest city in the world. That’s right, I know what you’re thinking… Upper Hutt.

    Who produced/engineered the album? How did the tracks come together in the studio, or at home?
    I recorded and mixed the 10 songs in my home studio. I had written around 60 ideas over the first 3 months and then cut it down to around 20 that I worked on. I chose ideas that had catchy hooks. Songs that I felt I would enjoy making and listening to. Along the way I had around 5 songs that were casualty’s. They weren’t quite up to standard. Each song took about a month to write and record. I would than work on another tune before coming back to the previous tune to mix fresh or make changes to. This album was particularly exciting for me as all songs were fresh and new. Nothing had been sitting around for any period of time. Finally the album was mastered by Howard Rogers from Bring It On studios in Auckland. I’ve worked with Howard on Origins and Ammps EP This Chaotic Symphony. He really knows how to smooth out any musical imbalances I might have missed. The mastering is the cream on the cake and he knows how to present the best flavours.

    How did the songwriting happen? Are there any overall themes within the songs/album?
    I use stream of consciousness to create tunes. I don’t think. I try not to overthink. Everything is fresh and demo like. For me that’s when I do my best work. The more time I spend on a tune the more I move away from the original intention. This album is very personal. There is an overall theme of trying to break free, but sometimes being stuck. It keeps repeating. A loop. But there is optimism. Love and family are the light and joy for me. There are moments of immense sadness and pressure. Moments of being lost and broken. Falling down and losing my mind. But always the answer of getting up and being set free. Whether that be in the form of a comic book hero like The Batman, or my family as in Into the light we stay. Days they come days they go is a reminder to let the pressure go. To enjoy life and keep smiling as my Dad used to say.

    Were you going for a different sound/approach on this album?
    Yes. In terms of writing, recording and mixing. It was being minimal. Keeping the amount of instruments down to a bare minimum. I always asked myself does it need to be their? I wanted what was on the album to be powerful and necessary. If it was in the way it was gone. I also wanted the songs I chose to be hooks you could sing along to. I wanted the listener to get lost in the tune and to feel the need to sing along. I lost so many songs that had great riffs or verses but no chorus. The chorus was all and important.

    Was there any specific gear you used to capture that?
    For me on this album it was the drums, and bass for low end growls and tribal rhythms. The electric guitar and acoustic for bells and whistles. The piano for strings and synth sounds. It was all sounds that would not date to much. So this album could fit into any time period. I kept the sound choices to a minimum so as to give the album its on palette.

    Is there a particular single/track that you feel captures the essence of the album?
    Set Me Free was the first song I worked on. It really set the scene of what was to come. Its minimal yet powerful. It was the beginning. As soon as I had that song I knew what would come after. The meaning behind the song also told me what I was to do and how to go about it. No prisoners full steam ahead.

    Is there a physical copy available? If not which digital platforms is it available on?
    I’d love to do vinyl. Lance Mcminn who styled the cover had ideas for vinyl. That’s where were going with it. I have to weigh up the cost and the potential sales. On digital it’s available everywhere. [Apple Music, Spotify, YouTube, Bandcamp, Soundcloud]

    Are you working on a video/videos for any of the songs? Are you doing any gigs or promotion for its release?
    I have created two videos so far from the album. Both have had great feedback. ‘Set me free’ and ‘Everyone wants to be your love’. My production partner on the videos is David St George. We have a lot of fun creating them. It’s become another passion. At the moment we’ve just finished shooting a video for ‘Night after night’ which is now in post-production. As with the song writing, albums and videos the idea is to grow, enjoy and learn. I hope I can reach some people with each song released. Maybe inspire them or help them to feel something. It is a real joy to write these songs. I hope someone out their will get joy out of listening to them.

    1st single ‘Set Me Free’, a cute video with a star performance by ‘vocalist’ Lily Masseurs.

    For 2nd single ‘Everyone Wants To Be Your Love’ Andrew learnt the song in reverse, walked backwards (without hitting one tree, post or cyclist) and than reversed the footage to create a brain twister of a music video.


  • General

    The Eighth Note: Ashley Alexander

    11.07.19 | Permalink | Comment? | By

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ‘The Eighth Note’ is 8 quick Questions with Wellington Musicians.
    A chance for us to catch up with people & see what they’re up to, or introduce you to a new musician/band and their music. Up next is Ashley Alexander.

     

    Who are you? Tell us a bit about your music:
    My names is Ashley Alexander, I’m a funk soul singer songwriter/producer from Paraparaumu, currently settled in between the smoke and suburbia of Auckland. My music is soul music for those who need a green light, skipping the noise and traffic of 9-5 life.

    What have you been working on lately? Any new tracks or albums on the way?
    So much music to come. The Debut EP “Staring at the sun for too long” will be released later this year followed with a bunch of shows around New Zealand this summer.

    Where is the best place people can follow you & find your music?
    Spotify, my Website, Facebook, Instagram, and Soundcloud.

    What were the 3 most influential albums to you growing up?
    I was an moody teenager..
    A rush of blood to the head – Coldplay
    Black gives way to blue – Alice in chains
    Lost & Found – Mudvayne

    Which other Wellington musician (s) would you most like to work with?
    My boy Louis Baker would be a great musical mind to explore.

    What is your favourite Wellington venue to play in?
    San Fran bathhouse was a trip.

    In your songwriting or composing (or the band’s songwriting) how do the compositions and songs take shape?
    I gravitate to the keys or guitar to create a base to work off, from there I form a whole track. Melodies and chords always come first.

    Where/when is your next gig?
    Announcing some end of year locations soon!


  • General

    The Eighth Note: Severed Beliefs

    08.07.19 | Permalink | Comment? | By

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ‘The Eighth Note’ is 8 quick Questions with Wellington Musicians.
    A chance for us to catch up with people & see what they’re up to, or introduce you to a new musician/band and their music. Up next is new metalcore band Severed Beliefs.

     

    Who are you? Tell us a bit about your music:
    We are Severed Beliefs. We play metalcore inspired by acts from the late 90s and early two thousands (Poison the Well, 7a7p, Unbroken).

    What have you been working on lately? Any new tracks or albums on the way?
    We’ve recently put a lot of work into our Debut demo which is out now on elimination records as well as writing and improving our craft with new tracks for a later release.

    Where is the best place people can follow you & find your music?
    Follow us on Facebook and Instagram and you can find our music on Spotify and the Elimination records Bandcamp. We also have our debut live set shot by Caspar Kneale photography up on his Youtube channel.

    What were the 3 most influential albums to you growing up?
    Fergus:
    Scribe – The Crusader
    Mob Deep – The Infamous
    Rage Against the Machine – Evil Empire
    Ian:
    Nevermind – Nirvana
    Alive or Just Breathing – Killswitch Engage
    Hybrid Theory – Linkin Park

    Which other Wellington musician (s) would you most like to work with?
    A split with Coldxwar would be real cool

    What is your favourite Wellington venue to play in?
    Aro Valley Hall for sure, All Ages hardcore forever.

    In your songwriting or composing (or the bandís songwriting) how do the compositions and songs take shape?
    Ian: The first EP all the music was written by me and Fergus wrote the lyrics. After that we asked Jasper and Josh (Guitarist and Bassist) to join the band. Now the process is becoming more collaborative.

    Where/when is your next gig?
    Our next gig is up in Auckland playing at the penrose underground. You can find the event on facebook titled Auckland Will be Laid to Waste.


  • General

    New Album: Black Spider Stomp

    04.07.19 | Permalink | Comment? | By

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ‘New Album’ is where a band or artist answers some questions about their latest release. Up next is Sam from Gypsy Jazz band Black Spider Stomp.

     

    When/where was the new album recorded?
    The album was recorded, at bass player (Scott’s) flat in Newtown. It’s a nice wooden floored room where we recorded our 7inch release too.

    Who produced/engineered the album? How did the tracks come together in the studio, or at home?
    Vanya Vitali from Scumbag College. He has recorded all of four of our albums so far as well as mixed a few of our live shows so definitely has an ear for capturing the sound we are after.

    How did the songwriting happen? Are there any overall themes within the songs/album?
    Were you going for a different sound/approach on this album?
    For our previous albums we have focused largely on original tunes that stay true to the gypsy swing tradition. However, since a large part of our repertoire is made up of classic, and obscure tunes written by the masters. Django Reinhardt and Stephane Grappelli, Matelot Ferret, Wasso Grünholz, Joseph Reinhardt, and more.
    For this album we wanted to record some of our own versions of these. Our previous records all featured the quintet “Black Spider Stomp” but for this recording we were only using a trio so we wanted our arrangements to utilize and explore sounds and space of the trio setting.

    Was there any specific gear you used to capture that?
    We always want our sound to be as natural as possible. The closer the recording sounds to the acoustic instrument the better so we normally use a pretty minimal approach when it comes to gear. A few Instrument and room mics basically. We did all the tracks as single takes for this record to give it an even more live and personal sound.

    Is there a particular single/track that you feel captures the essence of the album?
    I would say either Topsy or Bolero Troublant. We tried some new things with textures and space with both these arrangements which use the trio in the kind of ways that this record was about. One of my favorite songs that we play is on this album. It’s one of many waltzes by Wasso Grünholz named Wasso’s Waltz.

    Is there a physical copy available? If not which digital platforms is it available on?
    Yes! we have Black Spider Trio on CD which you can pick up at our live shows or contact us through Bandcamp where you can also purchase digital copies of any of our releases.

    Are you working on a video/videos for any of the songs? Are you doing any gigs or promotion for its release?
    We have no plans to do any sort of video at this stage but we are busy playing shows around wellington to promote the new record.


  • General

    New Album: Myele Manzanza

    28.06.19 | Permalink | Comment? | By

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ‘New Album’ is where a band or artist answers some questions about their latest release. The son of a Congolese master percussionist, New Zealand born Myele Manzanza first gained international attention as one third of NZ soul act, Electric Wire Hustle. After six years of performing, recording and touring with the band that he formed, he left in 2013 in order to release his solo debut. We caught up with him for a chat about his third solo release, ‘A Love Requited’, which has just dropped across all platforms.

     

    When/where was the new album recorded?
    We got the full recording sessions knocked out in about 3 – 4 days at Mixmasters Studios in Adelaide, South Australia.

    Who produced/engineered the album? How did the tracks come together in the studio, or at home?
    The music is material I’ve been working on over the past two years. Gradually composing, introducing it to bands to perform and revising it to where it got to now. So while we had a very quick turnaround in the studio, it was because I had two years of prep to get it there. The album was produced with bassist Ross McHenry and engineered by Tom Barnes.

    How did the songwriting happen? Are there any overall themes within the songs/album?
    I was definitely doing a lot more inward looking reflection for this record. Thinking about death, family, relationships, career etc and trying to use the writing process to help work through some of those things. If I was to sum it up in a sentence, A Love Requited is really about the process of getting over my own shit.

    Were you going for a different sound/approach on this album?
    I’d say musically, where One was my producer/beatmaker album and OnePointOne was my live drummer/bandleader album, “A Love Requited” has a greater focus on composition and arranging. Rather than working with software & samples, most of the time was spent on piano and manuscript paper, getting a more thorough idea of harmony, melody and how to orchestrate across multiple instruments. In recording with primarily acoustic instrumentation (with the odd synth & electric guitar & bass in there) I feel it’s helped to give a richer & more organic sound, so while my hip hop & electronic music proclivities are still in there with the rhythm & energy, going with acoustic instrumentation recorded primarily in real-time without any click tracks etc. helped to free up the sound and get a more fluid and natural feel across the whole project.

    Was there any specific gear you used to capture that?
    My engineer would be more onto it in regard to tricks with mics & pre-amps etc. But really it’s just about the regular sound of the drums, horns, piano, guitar & bass and the musicianship behind it, and spending time getting inside the harmony to fully flesh out the arrangements to get there.

    Is there a particular single/track that you feel captures the essence of the album?
    I’m sure people will have their favourite songs when they hear it, and for me it kind of changes from day to day, but really I feel the album is best understood as a journey from top to bottom.

    Is there a physical copy available? If not which digital platforms is it available on?
    It’ll be out on vinyl through Bandcamp and all good record stores, as well as digital through the normal purchasing and streaming platforms. [Spotify, iTunes, YouTube, Apple Music]

    Are you working on a video/videos for any of the songs? Are you doing any gigs or promotion for its release?
    I’ll be touring New Zealand in July in support of the album with a new trio featuring Jonathan Crayford on keys and Johnny Lawrence on bass. I’m really excited to be on the road again.
    10th July – Auckland
    11th July – Hastings
    12th July – Wellington13th July – Wellington
    14th July – Queenstown
    16th July – Wanaka
    17th July – Christchurch
    Tickets and info can be found via www.myelemanzanza.com


  • General

    New E.P: Interns

    21.06.19 | Permalink | Comment? | By

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ‘New EP’ is where a band or artist answers some questions about their latest release. Up next is Andy, Rob and Nat from Interns.

    When/where was the new EP recorded?
    The EP was recorded by Warwick Donald in his Newtown studio. Singer/guitarist, Andy had worked with Warwick before as a member of The Overdogs and knew he’d do a good job and – as a non-band member – provide a useful perspective on how things could sound.

    Who produced/engineered the EP? How did the tracks come together in the studio, or at home?
    Warwick recorded and mixed the EP. We produced and mastered it with the help of Warwick and an algorithm. The tracks were written by Interns and essentially recorded as we’d performed them. We recorded over a couple of days: one to get the instruments down and one for vocals.

    Did the shorter format of an EP give you the option to experiment in any way with your sound or with different forms of song-writing?
    It was our first time in a professional studio so it all felt like experimenting. As mentioned, the bones of the tracks were as we performed them but some of the backing vocals were arranged in the studio, and some of the parts that don’t make the stage line up were improvised on the fly, e.g. the organ on Tell Me About Him and the percussion parts.

    Was there any specific gear you used to capture that?
    Singer/guitarist, Rob got a new guitar the day before we recorded the instrumental parts so he approached his solos like Schumacher with a new car. Andy uses an NHG guitar made by his mate, Nick Hallett, and an MPC amp modelled on a Vox Night Train.

    Is there a particular track or theme that the EP was formed around?
    People joke that we play “public service rock” because we sing about Wellington life and working for the government but we have many more dimensions than that. For example, we also sing about the Karori bus, Apple computers, getting shot in Nairobi and girls.

    Where do you see the EP’s place in growing an audience online? Do you see it as a progression towards an album or a separate entity?
    Ha, this question suggests we have a plan! For now we’re happy with what we’ve done. When we’ve got a fresh batch of songs we’ll probably have another crack.

    Which digital platforms is it available on?
    We signed up with a distributor who, we’re told, has got us on all the usual suspects including Spotify, Apple Music, iTunes, Google Play, YouTube Music, Amazon, Tidal, Pandora, iHeartRadio, etc. We’re also on Bandcamp.

    Are you doing any gigs or promotion for its release?
    Sadly, bassist/singer, Al is overseas for another twelve months or so which rules out a tour with the full line up that recorded the EP. The remaining band members will play as a trio though. Our next performance is on 22 June at San Fran, with our good friends Neverwoz, Megan McCarthy, and The Liam Poole Band.


  • General

    The Eighth Note: Yorke

    17.06.19 | Permalink | Comment? | By

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ‘The Eighth Note’ is 8 quick Questions with Wellington Musicians.

    A chance for us to catch up with people & see what they’re up to, or introduce you to a new musician/band and their music. Up next is Billy Ridgway, who records under the name Yorke, and has just released his multi-genre debut album Nü Yorke.

     

    Who are you? Tell us a bit about your music:
    My name is Yorke, I’m a 24 year old musician living in Wellington, New Zealand. The name Yorke originated when I first moved to Wellington because of my resemblance to the great Thom Yorke. Yorke became my nickname and who I was known as around the city. It’s also homage to my upbringing in Yorkshire. The title of my debut album “Nü Yorke” stemmed from the idea of bringing a new face and sound to my fanbase. Also being inspired by great artists from New York, I thought the play on words was perfect.⁣
    ‘⁣Nü Yorke’ has no specific genre. It brings in an array of sounds all the way from RnB to alternative rock. I wanted to create an album that isn’t just relatable to my peers in New Zealand, but is able to be translated worldwide. What better way in doing so, then using the language of love. With this album I have portrayed my stories in a way that will make you feel we have once walked in the same shoes. I hope I am able to give people temporary relief whilst they work their way through their own journey of life and love.

    What have you been working on lately? Any new tracks or albums on the way?
    I have a few new music videos in the works with the great Connor Pritchard. We only met for the first time late last year but the energy we have when we work together is truly magic. Connor is a very humble guy, who really cares about the art and shares a very similar vision with me. It works like clockwork every time.
    I’m also in a six man band, which will be performing the “Nü Yorke.” album with in the next few months. Every member of the band has been around during the beginning of my journey of becoming Yorke, so performing my first ever album with them will be something truly special. You won’t want to miss out on this one.
    Lastly, new music is on the way! I have an EP on the way with my best friend/audio engineer/very talented vocalist, Sparrow. We’ve been making music together since 2013, so our collaborative nature is very natural and unforced. We know each-others sounds so well that its very easy share the same vision when we’re writing a song together in the studio.

    Where is the best place where people can follow you & find your music?
    I would say my most active social media account would be my Instagram. But you can find me on Facebook, Youtube, Twitter. Pretty much everything. Honestly you’ll find everything you need on my Instagram.

    What were the 3 most influential albums to you growing up?
    This is an extremely difficult question, but if you want to know the three most influential albums that help me grow int my sound, I’ll try box it down for you.
    T-Pain – THR33 RINGZ (2008)
    So this came out when I was 13, before I even started making music. I was always very much into hip-hop, but this album mixed the qualities I loved about RnB with the bounce of Hip-hop I lived for. The album very much opened my eyes up to the importance of melodic sentences, as every song was such an ear worm. Every chorus had a futuristic tone to it, and would grab your attention. I think this is the first album I ever put on my MP3 player and I would have it on repeat. Anyway, this album is the only reason I started making music. One day I was bored and home and googled “How to sound like T-Pain.” That’s the first time I downloaded a DAW and I’ve been recording myself ever since.
    Chance the Rapper – AcidRap (2013)
    So this album came out on my first year out of high school, I had just moved to Christchurch to study audio engineering at MAINZ. I had already started a small fan base living in Blenheim, collaborating with artists such as Octobr and Tapz. As much as I loved RnB at this point, I was only making rap music as I hadn’t found my voice yet. This album changed everything. It brought me back to that old school feeling of hip-hop I loved, intertwined with Jazz that my Grandad had brought me up on as well. Most importantly, it had a brand new sound of melodic rap. Just the thing I had been looking for. Chance taught me you could still be conscious with your words, while using your voice to paint melodic strokes of art. This was the first step of infusing my work of hip-hop into something more melodic.
    Bryson Tiller – Trapsoul (2015)
    The final album that really pushed me in the right direction of where I wanted to take my music. This album was the perfect blend of the trap era of music, and the futuristic RnB I was so desperately trying to make. Over everything, the relatability of the album was all there. I had just gone through a rough breakup the same week this album dropped, and he spoke to me about my stories. This album really brought my passion into play. I wanted to make music for people who go through relationship issues, but don’t know how to express it. This album spoke to me in a way that made me feel like my situation was being listened to and validated. I can only hope my album spoke to a few people, the way this album spoke to me.

    Which other Wellington musician (s) would you most like to work with?
    Luckily I’ve already managed work with my favourite artists out of Wellington! But right now I can’t stop listening to George Young’s Mental, PT. 1 EP. I used to hear George DJ once a week at the restaurant I work at. He’s very passionate about music and you can hear that come through his EP, along with his character. Hopefully we can tee something up for the future!

    What is your favourite Wellington venue to play in?
    I’ve only played at a couple! But I would have to say my favourite venue to go see a live show would have to be San Fran. Excellent floor layout, a balcony to get some air over looking Cuba street. And when that floor is full, the acoustics of the room is absolutely incredible.

    In your songwriting or composing (or the bands songwriting) how do the compositions and songs take shape?
    I started out making music alone in my bedroom, as most of us do. It was a fun way to pass the time and also very therapeutic to be able to express myself. I do enjoy collaborating today, but if I want to get to the core of my music I usually have to be alone with only myself to converse with. Every day is so different from the last, so depending on how I’m feeling will define the outcome of the track. I work with a lot of producers from all over the world, so I usually have a few beat catalogues to dive into before I even get started. I’ll search for a beat that is in sync with the feeling I have in my stomach. I then set up the mic and get out how I’m feeling by free styling across the production until I’ve found some key melodies and lyrics. Usually at this point I’ll find the hook and it will become the heart of the song. After that its pretty easy, I’ll write around what the hook is focused on, and go back to my favourite melodies I kept and rewrite around them.

    Where/when is your next gig?
    This is undecided! I have a few venues that are keen to put on a show, I just need a bit more time to organise the band so I can put on the live show you all deserve!


  • General

    New E.P: Shuedet

    14.06.19 | Permalink | Comment? | By

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ‘New EP’ is where a band or artist answers some questions about their latest release. Shuedet released an E.P towards the end of last year, and we caught up with Thom from the band recently for a chat about it.

    When/where was the new EP recorded?
    The EP was recorded in a very haphazard piecemeal way in a couple of different home studio setups during 2018.

    Who produced/engineered the EP? How did the tracks come together in the studio, or at home?
    Everything was written, recorded, and produced by myself, and then I handed it over to Al Green for a proper mixdown. The tracks usually begin as improvised experiments with guitar or viola and some of my effects pedals, which I tend to loop and begin adding rhythmic elements on top of. The projects get revisited at a later points in time and tend to mutate away from the original idea until I have variations that I can use to form a song structure that I can add detail to. They take a while to marinate. Hardly ever will I finish something in one session.

    Did the shorter format of an EP give you the option to experiment in any way with your sound or with different forms of song-writing?
    The shorter EP format does allow me to experiment with new techniques and gear. The way I’ve made the previous 3 releases has been with a different setup each time. The hardware I’m using at present has been the most rewarding – the hands-on nature and immediacy, as well as the limitations have helped me refine my writing and performance. I like the shorter format because it allows me to do a lot of learning with an achieveable outcome to work towards. I don’t get a lot of time to do music so it helps keep the projects regular.

    Was there any specific gear you used to capture that?
    My pedal board has expanded to a pretty silly size but I’m able to send guitar, viola, and vocals through the chain to achieve a range of sounds but keep whole projects relatively cohesive. The Infinite Jets resynthesizer pedal is all over everything as it’s great at transforming sound sources in unpredictable ways and is super fun to play through. The brains of everything is the Synthstrom Deluge which has allowed me to ditch the computer almost completely. I use it mostly for sample sequencing and manipulation. It’s very intuitive to use and forces you to use your ears a bit more to make decisions. I think you’ve got one in your collection?

    Is there a particular track or theme that the EP was formed around?
    I wanted to simplify the songs I was making for this EP but maintain the immersive aspects. Trying to reproduce Permutations live was difficult because there was too many parts. I aimed to surround dnb/footwork style rhythms with fewer atmospheric parts that could be quickly produced in the pedal chain and more playable instrumental lines. The track Rawww came first and then from there the projects inevitably became for complicated as I learnt more about the equipment. Lyrically I reflect on my own experiences but try to keep it simple and ambiguous enough so that others can relate it to their own life. Writing is something I need to become more comfortable with – people seem to like words in songs.

    Where do you see the EPs place in growing an audience online? Do you see it as a progression towards an album or a separate entity?
    In terms of growing an audience: I guess the EP format means there is a reasonable amount of back catalogue material available to listen to and listeners can get an idea of the musical progression I’m making. The type of music I make means it’s very unlikely that a single will blow up on a Spotify playlist or whatever and the majority of my time is spent teaching so to make an album would take forever.

    Which digital platforms is it available on?
    The Rawww EP is available to stream or download on all the usual sources – Apple, Spotify, Google etc as well as on Bandcamp and SoundCloud.

    Are you doing any gigs or promotion for its release?
    The unofficial release show was part of a Ball of Wax showcase in a dreamy Newtown garden in January. No other dates locked in as of yet but hoping there will be a few opportunities through out the year!


  • General

    The Eighth Note: Dewie

    11.06.19 | Permalink | Comment? | By

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ‘The Eighth Note’ is 8 quick Questions with Wellington Musicians.

    A chance for us to catch up with people & see what they’re up to, or introduce you to a new musician/band and their music. Up next is Dewie, the new moniker of Sonya Ishimnikova who was previously part of duo Blue For Noon.

     

    Who are you? Tell us a bit about your music:
    I’m Dewie. I grew up in Russia, moved to New Zealand when I was young. The music I’ve been writing and am most inspired by is synthy, ambient and nostalgic.

    What have you been working on lately? Any new tracks or albums on the way?
    Sudden Venus, my first solo project came out a few days ago. I locked my self in my parents house whilst working on it, occasionally coming out for a cup of coffee and a chat with my mum.

    Where is the best place people can follow you & find your music?
    Now, you’ll be able to find the 4 tracks on Spotify, Tidal, YouTube etc.

    What were the 3 most influential albums to you growing up?
    Not going to lie, 200km/h In the Wrong Lane by t.A.T.u, Blood Type by Kino, Techenie by Chicherina.

    Which other Wellington musician (s) would you most like to work with?
    I feel like I could learn a lot from Linen!

    What’s your favourite Wellington venue to play in?
    I previously played at Laundry but would love to play at Caroline in the future.

    In your songwriting or composing (or the band’s songwriting) how do the compositions and songs take shape?
    There’s often a lingering feeling that ends up seeping into songs. Normally I begin with sound design then I’ll move on to the chords, melody and vocals. While arranging, I’ll add various components and mix as I go, which I feel like hinders the process but it’s worked for me so far.

    Where/when is your next gig?
    I’m currently away from home, so it will have to be once I come back in a few months time – in the meantime I’ll be doing a Björk and attempting to write music sans any music equipment.


  • General

    NZMM: Favourite Wellington Music Moment – Ludus

    31.05.19 | Permalink | Comment? | By

    For NZ Music Month the last couple of years, we asked bands/artists for a favourite memory of making music in Wellington.

    It could involve a favourite gig, a funny story from the recording studio, a moment that led to the inspiration for a song, the fond recollection of a defunct venue, or the piece of music or lyric that they were most proud of creating.

    We really enjoyed the stories people told us, so we are doing it again this year.

    Next up is local ambient electronic producer & DJ Emma Bernard AKA Ludus. Originally a classically trained pianist since childhood, Emma has been producing dreamy ambient works for 2 years and more recently some downtempo house for labels such as Margins. Ludus has been performing these live for 18 months at festivals such as Performance Arcade, Newtown Festival and opening for acts such as Pitch Black as well as a range of local acts including Disasterradio. Before producing, Emma DJd around Wellington and at festivals such as Taniwhas Den, and now runs the Friday Drive show every Friday from 4-7 on RadioActive.

    I’ve been lucky in having so many good experiences and met so many wonderful and hilarious people through playing music. Such a talent dense community that just keeps giving. One of my favourite memories would have to be opening for Pitch Black. Above being so chuffed with the opportunity of opening for electronic kiwi legends, they were such cool guys who gave great constructive feedback to my set. It was an older crowd who were really supportive, as if they had the future of NZ electronic music in mind. Not really sure how to explain it, but I loved the connectivity of it all. I also love the community at RadioActive, through DJing there, I find out about more incredible local music literally every week. They have a deep love for New Zealand music and you can really feel that when you hang out there which is awesome. Also another fun thing is when there’s no-one in the crowd but my friends! That is always a laugh and a good time.


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