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    New Album: The All Seeing Hand

    01.08.18 | Permalink | 1 Comment | By

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ‘New Album’ is where a band or artist answers some questions about their latest release. Up next is Jonny Marks from The All Seeing Hand, who have just dropped their latest release ‘Syntax Error’.


    When/where was the new album recorded?

    The album was recorded in a variety of places over a long period of time. The vocals were tracked at Arawhata -Flat Point, and a little bit in Jonny’s home. The electronics have been tweaked and honed in every quiet internet free space David can find. The drums were captured at Scumbag College, an amazing studio that is unfortunately no longer with us, due to the control of property by a wealthy class who have no interest in community.

    Who produced/engineered the album? How did the tracks come together in the studio, or at home?
    Alphabethead is the person who brings it all together. He ensures the bass is deep, and puts on just the right amount of sparkling sprinkles. The drums were recorded by Vanya Vitali who has worked with Ben extensively and has a gift for keeping life in the sound. Alphabethead works from home, but occasionally gets to housesit somewhere and live a blissful life of solitude and mixing.

    How did the songwriting happen? Are there any overall themes within the songs/album?
    The songs on this album come from a long time frame. Some we were performing around the time of Mechatronics and others we’ve never played live (until this tour!); so the ways they came to be, and the ways they have grown, are incredibly varied.
    We always try to have a sense of the tracks belonging together when putting out an album; this is why it has taken a while for some for some of these songs to finally be recorded, they were waiting for some other sonic friends to hang out with.
    With the title ‘Syntax Error’, all the tracks exist in a retro-future of jittering screens. The times we live in are confusing, and provoke both optimism and pessimism. The tracks are playful, and hopeful, but exist within a cracked piece of code. The sounds glitch between discord and harmony; resonate with tones of dystopia, and excite a more honest, flawed, utopia. Let’s reboot.

    Were you going for a different sound/approach on this album?
    Musically we approach each tune as an individual entity. Through playing live we see how they sit together; so any evolution of sound/approach happens as a natural process, we allow ourselves to explore our interests in the now. This means what we do is always changing, but sometimes it takes putting together an album to take that step back and attempt to amplify unconscious patterns. When putting this all together it definitely instigated a new visual world and colour palette.

    Was there any specific gear you used to capture that?
    David’s favourite cup, Jonny’s acoustomatic slippers, and Ben’s Squeak-a-Stool drum tech.

    Is there a particular single/track that you feel captures the essence of the album?
    A difficult question, in that the album is an entity, to focus in one line of code tells you nothing of the program.
    That said, the final touches on Royal Oil were done after the album had come together, so perhaps there is something in its arc that tells the overall tale of dystopian observation with a strand of resistance and hope in the final melody.

    Is there a physical copy available? If not which digital platforms is it available on?
    We will have cassettes available at shows. and some record shops will have t-shirts that come with a download code; otherwise it will be available online. We primarily use Bandcamp. Unfortunately the evils of Spotify have become so ubiquitous that we are currently researching how to assist in letting them leech and maintain market share. Once we have worked out the best distribution option we will be on most of the steaming streams. If you want to have pretty much direct interaction with us though Bandcamp is the place to get our music and merch.

    Are you working on a video/videos for any of the songs? Are you doing any gigs or promotion for its release?
    We have a video coming out for a song from Silicon and Synapse, called Lizard Brain. We worked with a team of some of our favourite people: Aurs Illojgali, Cooki Martin, Erica Sklenars, and Nathan Taare; and we are stoked with how it has turned out. We enjoy the collaborative process of video making, and the way it can place a song in an imagined environment; so hopefully there will be some, from this new album, in the future.
    From Syntax Error we have released the first single Royal Oil, and we are touring New Zealand, taking in Dunedin, Lyttelton, Auckland, Wellington, and Whanganui.


  • General

    The Eighth Note: Gavin Burgess

    26.07.18 | Permalink | Comment? | By

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ‘The Eighth Note’ is 8 quick Questions with Wellington Musicians.

    A chance for us to catch up with people & see what they’re up to, or introduce you to a new musician/band and their music.

    Today’s guest is Gavin Burgess, who has worked within various musical genres since the 1990s, and releases through his own label.

     

    Who are you? Tell us a bit about your music:
    I’m a recording, sometimes performing, songwriter/composer and multi-instrumentalist. It’s been a long journey from my earliest Lo-fi recordings, made on primitive equipment in the early 90s, to my latest album ‘Sophia’s Child’. In between I’ve passed through pop, rock, and gospel acts and even diverted into the realm of classical composition. I find it hard to define myself based on genre alone as I’m more interested in exploring all musical styles and seeing how I can mix and blend these influences. I guess it’s for this reason that I’m now most comfortable categorising my music as progressive rock, although I’m definitely more about composition than intricate noodling.

    What have you been working on lately? Any new tracks or albums on the way?
    Well, I’ve already touched on that, but quite a lot actually! In May, for NZ music month, I released two singles; I Digress by my side project ‘300 Llamas’ and In Which Aktaeon Is Torn Asunder b/w ‘(You Won’t Bring Me) Down/Celebration’ under my own name, the latter being a first taste of my new album ‘Sophia’s Child’. In June I re-released some old product; a single When Alice Dances, which was first released on the ‘Muster – Whanganui Compilation’ in 1998, and an EP of recordings by my early 90’s band Top Secret. There’ll be another single from ‘Sophia’s Child’ dropping in a few months, and the album itself, which is completed bar one song which we’re still working on, will be out at the end of the year.

    Where is the best place people can follow you & find your music?
    Everything comes out through my Gavland label. At the moment all of our digital and physical product is on Bandcamp – so make that your first stop:
    There’s also a bunch of information on my own Website, if you want to dig into more product info, press clippings, etc. Gavland is also on Facebook.

    What were the 3 most influential albums to you growing up?
    ABBA – Arrival (the first album I ever owned, a gift from my parents when I was 8 years old)
    The Who – Who’s Next (found in a second hand shop and, as per the felt pen on the cover, purchased for $2.50 when I was 13)
    Pink Floyd – Dark Side Of The Moon (given to me on cassette by the son of my parents friends, who was throwing it away because ‘It isn’t very good’.)

    Which other Wellington musician (s) would you most like to work with?
    I’d quite like to do something in the studio with Julie Lamb one day. Like me she’s released a bunch of stuff over the last decade so it would be interesting to see if I could contribute something to her work. She used to be my accountant so that would be a nice change of role. Years ago I worked with Mark Henderwood (a song we wrote together is on my album Demos ‘n’ Jams – which is a collection of early lo-fi recordings) and it would be cool to revisit that partnership now that we’ve both gained musical maturity. I’d also like to find another guitarist to work with so we can get some gigs happening but I don’t know who that’s going to be yet. He/She would have to have a quite eclectic and organic style.

    What’s your favourite Wellington venue to play in?
    Well, I haven’t gigged anywhere for a while now, and the venues have mostly changed since I did. I can tell you the type of venue I’d prefer though, which would be somewhere where the audience can tune in and listen. There’s nothing worse than feeling like you’re just providing background noise for people to drink to.

    In your songwriting or composing (or the band’s songwriting) how do the compositions and songs take shape?
    My first step is always to find the spirit of the song – the thing that ties music and lyrics and theme and binds them into a unified whole. This then suggests the rest. In that sense I guess it’s a bit of a spiritual process. I used to work out a song from start to finish on guitar, or sometimes piano, but now I have the luxury of completing compositions in my studio. I love the flexibility this allows. I first work on documenting the basic idea, often with sacrificial demo tracks, but sometimes these first takes stay in the finished piece. Then I start adding, cutting and pasting to flesh out the structure, and then layering, always keeping to the maxim ‘serve the song’.
    At some point the track moves from being a demo to a work-in-progress. I tend to build a guide drum track with a drum machine or samples before completing most of the other instrumental parts, and then get the drummer in to track his parts towards the end. Most people work the other way around but I find, with a good drummer who can lock to a click, this works well for me. It also means, as I can play most other instruments at least adequately, I don’t have to lock the arrangement down until later in the process. Whilst I’m working on the tune I spend a lot of time sipping red wine, listening to what I’ve done so far, absorbing the song, and allowing intuition to play its part. Through this process I start to hear in my head the parts and instruments I want to add, which leads to the joy of knowing what to track next – or the sinking feeling of realising I’m going to have to involve a string section, which is always a tedious experience.

    Where/when is your next gig?
    I’m overseas right now but plan to be back in NZ in the spring, when I’ll be doing some more recording with Nev Messent and Simon Shaw – my old rhythm section from The GB Band. We’d also like to do some small intimate gigs in the Wellington area with a bit of a different approach from your normal band gig – looking to create an atmosphere which shifts the audience from listeners to participants. If we can get the stars to align it would be quite nice to film the gigs for a live DVD as well. I also had a message from Murray Loveridge (Blues Buffet, Quincy Conserve) the other day asking me if I had anything coming up, so I might end up doing some stuff with Murray again as well. And there’s been this idea brewing in my head for a while now – a large outdoor performance with choirs and brass and soloists and all the things that, on top of being subject to the weather, make that kind of event complex – but that’s a bit further off as yet.


  • General

    The Eighth Note/New E.P – Orangefarm

    20.07.18 | Permalink | Comment? | By

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ‘The Eighth Note’ is 8 quick Questions with Wellington Musicians.

    A chance for us to catch up with people & see what they’re up to, or introduce you to a new musician/band and their music.

    ‘New EP’ is where a band or artist answers some questions about their latest release.

    Today’s guest is Nigel from Orangefarm, who have just released a new E.P.

     

    Who are you? Tell us a bit about your music:
    We’re an indie rock band, based in Wellington. Our music is really focused on the song. Our sound has been described as, ‘cinematic,’ and ‘intimate jangle pop’ by various friends and critics. The line up consists of the usual guitar (Nigel Mitchell), drums (Karen Apperley,) and bass (Celia McAlpine), but we also are lucky enough to have the wonderfully talented Vivien Reid and her French horn. Viv also plays keyboards and percussion and adds her voice to mine and Celia’s.

    What have you been working on lately? Any new tracks or albums on the way?
    The main thing we’re working on is preparing for our EP release party at Moon on July 21st. We’re super excited about that and we want to make it the best show we’ve ever done. We’ve also got a spot on NZ Live with Jesse Mulligan on August 3rd.

    When/where was the new EP recorded?
    Recording actually started in November 2016 at Blue Barn in Newtown. Our sound engineer produced one of the tracks, but he got too busy to do the others so we just sat on them for about a year until I decided to go back to Blue Barn in March of this year and get them done.

    Who produced/engineered the EP? How did the tracks come together in the studio, or at home?
    The brilliant James Goldsmith engineered and ended up producing the songs. We had them written and rehearsed before we went into the studio.

    Did the shorter format of an EP give you the option to experiment in any way with your sound or with different forms of song-writing?
    Not really. It was just all we could afford.

    Was there any specific gear you used to capture that?
    No.

    Is there a particular track or theme that the EP was formed around?
    The songs are mostly reflections on identity and loss, stemming from my parents experience of the Christchurch earthquake. Although they’re not ‘earthquake songs’ that’s kind of the event that formed the images and lines in the lyrics. ‘8 Things’ is the exception. I wrote that about 19 years ago but it seemed to fit with the others and we know, from performing that people like it.

    Where do you see the EPs place in growing an audience online? Do you see it as a progression towards an album or a separate entity?
    Yes. We’d love to record an album next. We’re just learning about growing an audience, and it seems that online and live performance are both essential ingredients.

    Which digital platforms is it available on?
    Pretty much all of them.

    Are you doing any gigs or promotion for its release?
    21st July at Moon, plus our slot on Jesse Mulligan’s show, August 3rd. We’ve sent it to a number of student radio stations too, so hopefully one or two of them will play it.

    Where is the best place people can follow you & find your music?
    We can be found on Facebook, Bandcamp and our Website.

    What were the 3 most influential albums to you growing up?
    This is a good one! I’m 52, so some of the albums will be from the dark ages, especially to our 22 year old bass player! I was a big Queen fan when I was a kid, and the first album I bought was their first, self titled one. I listened to it constantly and tried to sing like Freddie Mercury. David Bowie’s Scary Monsters was also a fave when I was in high school, largely for Robert Fripp’s unbelievable guitar playing. The third one would probably be The Bats, Daddy’s Highway. Still a personal favourite.

    Which other Wellington musician (s) would you most like to work with?
    Grayson Gilmour is just a genius. Not sure if our sound would work on a double bill with him, but he’s amazing anyway. We’ve played with our friends Let’s Planet a couple of times. They’re very cool. We’d also love to do a set with Phoenix Foundation.

    What’s your favourite Wellington venue to play in?
    Moon is becoming our go to venue. So friendly and good to work with. It’s really cosy and the pizza is good.

    In your songwriting or composing (or the band’s songwriting) how do the compositions and songs take shape?
    I usually write the songs and upload demos to Soundcloud our something to share with the others. Karen adds amazing drum magic and Celia figures out some bass, unless I’ve written a baseline, by our next practice. Viv will also come up with some ideas and we’ll go from there. ‘The Water’ and another one we haven’t recorded started with Karen’s drums and built from there. Another new one came out of a jam between Karen, Celia and me.

    Where/when is your next gig?
    July 21, at Moon in Newtown.


  • General

    The Eighth Note/New Album: Wellington Sea Shanty Society

    13.07.18 | Permalink | Comment? | By

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ‘The Eighth Note’ is 8 quick Questions with Wellington Musicians.

    A chance for us to catch up with people & see what they’re up to, or introduce you to a new musician/band and their music.

    ‘New Album’ is where a band or artist answers some questions about their latest release.

    Today’s guest is Lake from the Wellington Sea Shanty Society, who have just released a new album in collaboration with Croche Dedans.

     

    Who are you? Tell us a bit about your music:
    The Wellington Sea Shanty Society. Strictly shanties.

    What have you been working on lately? Any new tracks or albums on the way?
    We have just released our French/English collab with Croche Dedans called Ahoy!

    When/where was the new album recorded?
    In April 2017 we recorded the album at a great community recording studio in Vannes, just outside Nantes, France.

    Who produced/engineered the album? How did the tracks come together in the studio, or at home?
    Gaëtan Griveau engineered the album then I (Lake) mixed it back in my bedroom in Toronto. This is a joint album with our French friends Croche Dedans so we didn’t have much time get ready for the studio. We chose the tracks to record over e-mail then had a couple of jams before we started recording.

    How did the songwriting happen? Are there any overall themes within the songs/album?
    These are mainly traditional sea shanties. Vorn wrote the one original shanty.
    The history of Wellington Sea Shanty Society and Croche Dedans are as intertwined as a heaving line knot. After learning the way of the chant marin from Croche in Nantes, circa 2012, I returned to Aotearoa NZ to found a shanty group of my own. Vorn Dont Pere Etait Marin was the only squeeze box player in town, and he was keen, so the Wellington Sea Shanty Society was born!
    In 2014 Croche Dedans made their way down to the South Pacific for our first joint shanty tour. In 2015 we joined forces again for a tour of Bretagne.
    Over the years Croche & WSSS have created what has come to be known as the ‘troisieme set’. After playing a set each, we crowd onto the stage and engage in a shanty battle: French verse vs. English verse, Kiwi squeezebox vs. Breton banjo. This album is us attempting to bottle this salty energy.

    Were you going for a different sound/approach on this album?
    Not really. It’s a little more ‘straight up shanty’ compared to our other albums. We just use the instruments we play live.

    Is there a particular single/track that you feel captures the essence of the album?
    La Complainte Des Terres Neuva/The Men of the Grand Banks’ Cry: The W.S.S.S usually do this one in French when we’re in New Zealand but we translated it to English on the train from Paris to Nantes. I think the switching between languages works really well. I also love the defiance of this shanty.

    Is there a physical copy available? If not which digital platforms is it available on?
    Yes. Physical copies can be ordered from our Bandcamp page.

    Are you working on a video/videos for any of the songs? Are you doing any gigs or promotion for its release?
    We have one video, and a couple of live videos of tracks that appear on the album. The W.S.S.S will be back performing in and around Wellington from September! For the full W.S.S.S + Croche Dedans experience you’ll have to wait for the next time we can French to travel south.

    Where is the best place people can follow you & find your music?
    Twitter, Facebook & our Website.

    What were the 3 most influential albums to you growing up?
    In my lifetime as a shanty singer:
    Croche Dedans: Ostrava
    The Corries: Live from Scotland
    New Zealand Folk Songs by Neil Colquhoun (This is a book)

    Which other Wellington musician (s) would you most like to work with?
    Anyone with a shanty disposition.

    What’s your favourite Wellington venue to play in?
    Sprig & Fern Tinakori Rd & the Southern Cross.

    In your songwriting or composing (or the band’s songwriting) how do the compositions and songs take shape?
    We normally write alone. Then workshop things together.

    Where/when is your next gig?
    TBC!!


  • General

    The Eighth Note: Ingrid & The Ministers

    11.07.18 | Permalink | Comment? | By

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ‘The Eighth Note’ is 8 quick Questions with Wellington Musicians.

    A chance for us to catch up with people & see what they’re up to, or introduce you to a new musician/band and their music.

    Today’s guest is Ingrid Saker, who is the leader of new band Ingrid and the Ministers.

     

    Who are you? Tell us a bit about your music:
    I’m the Ingrid in Ingrid and the Ministers. I wrote my first song when I was 13 and had just started learning guitar. I taught myself how to play because I was too busy with other things to have any lessons. Girls also weren’t really encouraged to learn guitar where I’m from, so for years I was terrified of performing in front of people even though I wanted to. A lot of my music now comes from a place of reclaiming my voice and my right to make sounds. I love starting really quietly and building to a massive climax. I call my music psychedelic frock music because I love rock bands like Pink Floyd and The Velvet Underground but I’m also heavily influenced by female folk-y musicians like Laura Marling, Nadia Reid, Sharon Van Etten.

    What have you been working on lately? Any new tracks or albums on the way? Any new tracks or albums on the way?
    I’ve just recorded a debut EP with the band.

    Where is the best place people can follow you & find your music?
    Facebook definitely.

    What were the 3 most influential albums to you growing up?
    Laura Marling ‘Alas I Cannot Swim’.
    Neil Young ‘After The Goldrush’
    The Beatles ‘Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’

    Which other Wellington musician (s) would you most like to work with?
    Ebony from Eb and Sparrow and Charlotte Forrester from Womb.

    What’s your favourite Wellington venue to play in?
    San Fran I think.

    In your songwriting or composing (or the band’s songwriting) how do the compositions and songs take shape?
    I normally write the songs on my own with a guitar and then bring them to the band and we jam them out. Sometimes the structure can change a fair bit with the band.

    Where/when is your next gig?
    I’m doing a solo acoustic session at Bats Theatre on Saturday 14th July. 9:15pm! Next full band gig is TBC but coming soon!


  • General

    The Eighth Note: Miromiro

    10.07.18 | Permalink | Comment? | By

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ‘The Eighth Note’ is 8 quick Questions with Wellington Musicians.

    A chance for us to catch up with people & see what they’re up to, or introduce you to a new musician/band and their music.

    Today’s guest is Ashok Jacob, who makes Electronica music under the moniker Miromiro.

     

    Who are you? Tell us a bit about your music:
    I’m Ashok, I make downtempo IDM and electronica as Miromiro. I’m a history and geography student which is a big influence on my music. It’s heavily inspired by environment, both natural and manmade.

    What have you been working on lately? Any new tracks or albums on the way?
    I just put out an album called Prachanda Path, but I’m always working on new stuff. Plus, I’m also working on the soundtrack for an upcoming RPG coming out of Canada, which is very exciting.

    Where is the best place people can follow you & find your music?
    You can find my music on my Bandcamp page, but it’s also on Spotify and loads of other streaming services. If you really want to you can follow me on twitter @miromironz, although I wouldn’t if I were you.

    What were the 3 most influential albums to you growing up?
    The album that had the biggest effect on me as a kid was probably Lemon Jelly’s debut album KY. In my early teens I started listening to more intense electronica, so second would be Boards of Canada’s Geogaddi. Third would probably be Snivilisation by Orbital, which is where I found my love of sampling vintage media.

    Which other Wellington musician (s) would you most like to work with?
    Rhian Sheehan!

    What’s your favourite Wellington venue to play in?
    I’ve not played live yet, so I don’t know.

    In your songwriting or composing (or the band’s songwriting) how do the compositions and songs take shape?
    Generally I start with a single element that I really like, whether it be a melody, some chords or a drum pattern, then I build everything else around that. I don’t usually have a final goal or an idea of what I want it to sound like at the end, I just sort of meander around different sounds until I’m satisfied.

    Where/when is your next gig?
    I don’t know! I don’t have any particular plans to start playing live, although I am interested in doing so.


  • General

    The Eighth Note: Louis Thompson-Munn

    05.07.18 | Permalink | Comment? | By

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ‘The Eighth Note’ is 8 quick Questions with Wellington Musicians.

    A chance for us to catch up with people & see what they’re up to, or introduce you to a new musician/band and their music.

    Today’s guest is pianist/vocalist Louis Thompson-Munn, who is involved in various Musical projects.

    Who are you? Tell us a bit about your music:
    I’m a Wellington based piano/vocalist, currently I’ve just completed a NZ tour with my jazz trio Ol’ King Cole – though you can probably catch me playing around town with a variety of different bands.

    What have you been working on lately? Any new tracks or albums on the way?
    Just before going away on tour I released an album with my trio Ol’ King Cole of some works of the great Nat King Cole’s trio. I’ve also been working with a few other groups with hopefully some new music on the way – The Fades, Moira Jean, Wellington City Shake-em-on-Downers & Neo Hot Jive Orchestra to name a few.

    Where is the best place people can follow you & find your music?
    Facebook is probably the best way to keep up with the bands I play in with, though I sometime keep my Website updated! Haha

    What were the 3 most influential albums to you growing up?
    Way to many to name! Haha – though I was influenced by a number of things. My Mum grew up a little in the USA & Canada so I got a lot of the jazz cannon home that way with my Pop also playing piano and singing these tunes. But on the other hand Dad grew up with the Rolling Stones and the Pink Floyd etc. so a variety of music! If it sounds good to you, it’s good!

    Which other Wellington musician (s) would you most like to work with?
    Again, way too many to name! We’re very lucky to have such amazing talent in this city, and country!

    What’s your favourite Wellington venue to play in?
    There’s always great vibes in every venue but the Rogue & Vagabond is always a great time! And they have a piano there so it makes my life easy most of the time ;-P

    In your songwriting or composing (or the band’s songwriting) how do the compositions and songs take shape?
    This can vary of course depending on who I’m working with, but songs/compositions can take shape in many ways. Sometimes you’ll have someone with some chord progressions or a riff to work from, then you can jam those out to find a melody organically. But you can also go the other way and have lyrics and maybe a melody first. Sometimes someone will just write a tune from head to toe as well, so it’s always pretty different.

    Where/when is your next gig?
    Thursday I’m playing with a funk trio at Rogue & Vagabond, 9:30pm.
    Friday at Rogue again with the Moira Jean band, 9:30pm.
    Sunday night at The Library, 8:30pm with Oscar Laven (sax) & Hikurangi Schaverien-Kaa (drums) playing organ trio


  • General

    The Eighth Note: O-Boy!

    26.06.18 | Permalink | Comment? | By


     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ‘The Eighth Note’ is 8 quick Questions with Wellington Musicians.

    A chance for us to catch up with people & see what they’re up to, or introduce you to a new musician/band and their music.

    Today’s guest is Bianca from the band O-Boy, who have recently re-located to Wgtn.

     

    Who are you? Tell us a bit about your music:
    We are Bryony Roberts and Bianca Bailey, a grunge rock band, originally from Auckland, now based in Wellington.

    What have you been working on lately? Any new tracks or albums on the way?
    At the moment we’re just getting back into playing, hopefully will be writing and recording some new stuff soon!

    Where is the best place people can follow you & find your music?
    You can find us on Facebook under O-Boy and on Spotify and Bandcamp under O-Boy! (We like having the ! in our name but for some reason FB doesn’t let us have it :().

    What were the 3 most influential albums to you growing up?
    You’re a Women I’m a Machine – Death From Above 1979, Elephant – The White Stripes and Fuzz – Fuzz.

    Which other Wellington musician (s) would you most like to work with?
    Memaidens, Onono, Louisa, we could go on, there are so many talented artists in Wellington.

    What’s your favourite Wellington venue to play in?
    So far we’ve only played a few venues, being Caroline, Meow and Parrotdog Bar and they’ve all been a blast, Parrotdog bar was definitely a wicked experience.

    In your songwriting or composing (or the bandís songwriting) how do the compositions and songs take shape?
    Most of the time is starts with a bass line, or a set of lyrics, we work part by part working on and intro or a verse, or a few different sections before figuring out how they al fit in together mostly. Or we just roll with whatever comes 😛

    Where/when is your next gig?
    Our next gig in on the 29th June, we’re opening for Earth Tongue at Valhalla.


  • General

    The Eighth Note: Bad Friend

    22.06.18 | Permalink | Comment? | By


     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ‘The Eighth Note’ is 8 quick Questions with Wellington Musicians.

    A chance for us to catch up with people & see what they’re up to, or introduce you to a new musician/band and their music.

    Today’s guest is Taylor from Bad Friend, who have just released their debut E.P.

    Who are you? Tell us a bit about your music:
    Bad Friend is made up of good friends Emma, Victoria, Zac and Taylor. We started playing together really gently fleshing out these really lush, simple, short & sad pop songs that Emma had. Because we all had this shared affection & affinity for emo & pop-punk, it kinda organically got louder & noisey-er & I guess more fun.

    What have you been working on lately? Any new tracks or albums on the way?
    To be honest, we have been working hard & focusing on getting the E.P out, which is made up of some pretty old material. Once that is done, we are going to be writing new material, but it could be a little while away.

    Where is the best place people can follow you & find your music?
    Facebook & Bandcamp at this point.

    What were the 3 most influential albums to you growing up?
    I’m not sure if I could confidently find the ‘most influential’ for all us, so we each gave a fav and then one we come back to as a group;
    The Same Old Blood Rush With A New Touch – Cute Is What We Aim For
    A Different Arrangement – Black Marble
    The Love Below – Andre 300
    Loveless – My Bloody Valentine
    &<3 From Under the Cork Tree – Fall Out Boy <3

    Which other Wellington musician (s) would you most like to work with?
    We had a really nice time working with Jules from Soda Boys when he filled in for Zac, so maybe something for intentional & considered with him.

    What’s your favourite Wellington venue to play in?
    We have been really lucky to play a few shows at some of friends flats, especially in our early days. These are always a treat!

    In your songwriting or composing (or the band’s songwriting) how do the compositions and songs take shape?
    Often someone will bring forward most of a finished song, although it might just be the guitar part and lyrics. We try to be collaborative as much as possible, everyone writing their own parts and feeling good about that. We don’t really write together spontaneously too often, although it was how one song on the E.P came about, so that might be a bigger part of it going forward.

    Where/when is your next gig?
    At this point we don’t have anything booked, so watch this space.


  • General

    The Eighth Note: Maxwell Young

    21.06.18 | Permalink | Comment? | By

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    ‘The Eighth Note’ is 8 quick Questions with Wellington Musicians.

    A chance for us to catch up with people & see what they’re up to, or introduce you to a new musician/band and their music.

    Today’s guest is bedroom producer Maxwell Young.

    Who are you? Tell us a bit about your music:
    My name is Maxwell Young. I make music independently in my bedroom. Most of it stems from experiences of anxiety and heartbreak. My music is interestingly most listened to in major international cities like New York, London, Los Angeles and has now collectively over ten million plays.

    What have you been working on lately? Any new tracks or albums on the way?
    I have my first self produced album “Daydreamer” releasing on July 18th. It’s the most work I’ve ever put into a project and I’m really excited for it to finally come out. I see it as more of a diary than an album because it’s really personal and relatively rough around the edges but I’m proud of it for that fact.

    Where is the best place people can follow you & find your music?
    You can hear my music wherever you listen to music on the internet [Soundcloud] and you can follow me at on Instagram to keep up to date with what I have going on as well as whatever other social media you prefer.

    What were the 3 most influential albums to you growing up?
    Wolfgang Amadeus Phoenix by Phoenix, Vampire Weekend’s Self Titled & A Rush of Blood to the Head by Coldplay. There’s so many more but I hold these very close to my heart and think they’ve influenced my sound a lot. These albums all have originality, flair and really clever songwriting within the bounds of creating commercial, structured Popular music. I’d like to strike that balance as well as those bands did with those projects one day.

    Which other Wellington musician (s) would you most like to work with?
    Right now I’m working on music with my friend Tom Verberne who I met doing the Massey Commercial Music Course and would like to record a lot of other musicians I’ve met there. That’s something I’m looking forward to doing more on the project after Daydreamer. Orchestrating others to follow my vision rather than realising it all myself.

    What’s your favourite Wellington venue to play in?
    San Fran is the one I’ve played in the most, my first show opening for the LA band The Internet was there. I really like how it’s narrow. Makes it fun to be on stage and look out. Although I’d like to perform at quite a few more venues really, I’m still relatively new to live performance.

    In your songwriting or composing (or the band’s songwriting) how do the compositions and songs take shape?
    It’s different every time. I’m always writing lyrics and recording melody ideas on my phone. Often it starts with guitar chords as it’s the easiest songwriting tool for me but I’m trying to start with melody before chords so I can make more memorable melodies. But it’s really just a matter of me making a musical moment that feels full by messing around with adding layers until the loop feels colourful and then creating the developed structure and writing to it.

    Where/when is your next gig?
    I’m playing my first headline show at Caroline on the 21st of July (this Thursday). I really don’t know what to expect but have been looking forward to doing my own show for a long time. Tom Verberne who I mentioned earlier and Josie Moon will be opening.


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