The Upbeats

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About this artist...

Decade(s) active:


From our shelves:

Albums by this artist


From DigitalNZ:

  • Dancing in the Dark

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Documentary ; Web

    "Celebrating the “transformative power of dance”, Dancing in the Dark centres on Peter Vosper, an inventor who has designed his own custom light suit as an outlet for his creativity. It also makes the perfect addition to No Lights No Lycra, an event where participants spend an hour dancing to upbeat music in the dark. While most dancers can’t be seen (as is the appeal of the event — dance like no one’s watching), Peter’s glowing suit takes centre stage and makes for quite the spectacle. The film is part of the Loading Docs series of shorts, made for exhibition online." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Kia Tu Mahea (To Be Free)

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: R&B ; Music Video

    "A colourful clip for an upbeat track that blends R'n'B, hip-hop and Māori instrumentation and language. The acclaimed kapa haka group Waka Huia sing on the track and perform in the video." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Herbs

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Music Video

    "The founders of Pacific reggae, Herbs were one of Aotearoa's most important bands of the 80s. The band had 10 Top 20 singles, and recorded hits with fellow Kiwi legends Dave Dobbyn ('Slice of Heaven') and Tim Finn ('Parihaka'). Though infectiously upbeat, Herbs' music was always politically conscious (1980 hit 'French Letter' became the sound of NZ's anti-nuclear stance). Herbs featured three vocalists —Dilworth Karaka, Willie Hona, and the late Charlie Tumahai. In 2008, the band reconvened for 30th anniversary compilation Lights Of The Pacific: The Very Best Of Herbs." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • Mercury Lane - Series Two, Episode One

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Documentary ; Arts/Culture ; Television

    "This episode of arts show Mercury Lane features legendary musician Bill Sevesi, and poet Sonja Yelich (mother of musician Lorde). Sevesi takes centre stage: various musician friends join him to reminisce about packing Auckland dance halls in the 50s and 60s (at least until the arrival of 10 o'clock closing). After celebrating his 79th birthday, Sevesi is still as upbeat and music-obsessed as ever, especially when it comes to his beloved steel guitar and ukulele. In the final clip, Sonja Yelich performs her poem Teeth, with wry accompanying visuals from director Fiona Samuel." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Snakeskin

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Thriller ; Drama ; Film

    "For her first feature, writer/director Gillian Ashurst wanted a “big wide road movie; big skies; big long roads.” Cruising the Canterbury landscapes are small-town dreamers Alice (Heavenly Creature Melanie Lynskey) and Johnny (future Almighty Johnson Dean O’Gorman). But the duo’s adventures go awry after encountering a charming American cowboy. Reviews were generally upbeat: praising the talented cast, plus Ashurst’s ability to mix moods and genres. Snakeskin won five awards at the 2001 NZ Film and TV Awards, including best film and cinematography." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Love You Like I Should

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Pop ; Music Video

    "Despite the enduring success of the title track, ‘Love You Like I Should’ was the big hit from Dave Dobbyn’s first solo album Loyal. It’s an upbeat rocker complete with horns which Dobbyn has described as a “rant”. The lyrics echo the album’s themes of love and loyalty but the message of defiance to the “powers that be” seems to hark back to the messy, failed prosecution he faced after the Queen Street riot. The video captures the energy of song and performance as Dobbyn confronts the camera and backing singer Margaret Urlich models her gaucho look." (NZ On Screen summary)

  • View on NZ On Screen Wayho

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Pop ; Electronic ; Music Video

    "An eco-anthem lurks at the heart of this infectious, upbeat Minuit number. To accompany it, director Sally Tran conjures up a claustrophobic world where people are trapped inside a decaying building (actually Spookers haunted house at Karaka), and flowers and outdoor pursuits are the stuff of museum displays. Lead vocalist Ruth Carr (complete with bird make-up) and her dancers run this way and that, but there seems to be no escape. The song plays out with Carr singing to herself because she decided no-one else would write a song with her name in it." (NZ On Screen summary)

 

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