LOST BiRD

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Formed in 2012 folk duo LOST BiRD are Ali Whitton (guitar and voice) and Oliver Vetter (violin and voice). Ali excavates his heart into the songs, and Oliver covers them with whiskey-soaked violin lines…

From Ali:
My aim this year was to make an album and, without thinking too hard about it, I was going to launch a kickstarter campaign. But I started to realise that I needed a more step-by-step process that took the audience along with us. We’ve made two quality recordings of some (hopefully) good songs. We’ve got some awesome New Zealand artwork which you can buy prints of. The songs will be for sale for the next three months, after which they will be put onto Spotify, iTunes, and all other major outlets. All proceeds from your support on Bandcamp will go back into recording more songs for you…

Ali meets RNZs Charlotte Graham for a laid-back acoustic set and a chat about leaving the whirlwind of London for a life in the New Zealand outdoors…

From Martin Andrews BSide Stories blog/podcast Ali discusses his Celtic origins in England, the influence of the notorious Wellington weather on his songwriting and the difficulties of maintaining a working life while following your heart in the arts. Also features three live performances of as yet unreleased LOST BiRD songs.

Cover used with permission.

Last edited: 13.07.16

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From DigitalNZ:

  • Kete Aronui - Richard Nunns

    Source: NZ On Screen

    Resource type: Documentary ; Arts/Culture ; Māori ; Television

    "Richard Nunns is a renowned expert in taonga pūoro — traditional Māori instruments like wood and bone flutes. This 2007 episode of the Māori Television arts show sits down with him as he narrates his collaboration with Brian Flintoff and the late Hirini Melbourne — “a magic coalition of separate skills” — and the journey they’ve undertaken to resurrect lost sounds. Inspired by museum objects, literature and song, the trio led the revival of the form in contemporary Aotearoa. Nunns says the pūoro would’ve functioned as “a cellphone to the divine” for tohunga (experts)." (NZ On Screen summary)

 

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