Anna Leah

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annaleah2

Anna Leah was from Birmingham, England where she sang in an all girl group, before emigrating to Wellington. She was quite a successful pop and jazz singer. Her first recorded output came in 1973 when she shared one side of a single on the Strange label with a song called “Broken Blossom”. That particular song also appeared on a compilation album called “Celebration Part 1” from Strange Records in 1975.

In 1973 she switched to EMI and started to release a number of singles. Her first for EMI had been an entry in the 1973 Studio One Television competition. It was called “Love Bug” and back with “1-2-3-4-5” it was very popular as a kids song and reached number 3 on the National charts.

The next two singles in 1973 didn’t do any good. They were “Christmas Birthday”/”Christmas Song” and “Blacksmith Blues”/”Mack The Knife”. She was back in the charts in May 1975 with a song called “Wahine” backed with “The Importance Of You”, making it to number 16. “Wahine” was a tribute song to one of New Zealand’s worst disasters. The ship “Wahine” sinking just inside the heads to Wellington Harbour during a severe storm, resulting in a large number of people drowning.

The next single in 1975, “Silly Song”/”Wave The Banner” failed to chart. Two final singles came out in 1976 along with an album called Reborn”. The singles were “Climbing The Wall”/”Reborn” and “Be A Child Again”/”Brand New Day”.

After that she moved to Australia.

annaleah

Grateful acknowledgement is made to Bruce Sergent for letting us use this material from his great discographical site New Zealand Music of the 60’s, 70’s and a bit of 80’s.

Last edited: 14.04.18



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