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  • Adrienne, Internet, Library, Māori literature, Writing

    Māwhai Tuhituhi online Te Reo writing competition for Te Wiki O Te Reo Māori

    18.07.14 | Permalink | Comments Off on Māwhai Tuhituhi online Te Reo writing competition for Te Wiki O Te Reo Māori

    Hei whakanui i Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori 2014, kei te mahi pakiwaitara tuhituhi ā-ipurangi Te Matapihi ki te Ao Nui, ā, ka taea e koe e tō kura rānei ētahi taonga te wini.

    Kua oti kē i te kaituhi rongonui haere nei a Paora Tibble te whiti tuatahi te tuhituhi, ā, māu e āpiti atu ō tuhituhi ki te pakiwaitara ia rā, hei te 21-25 o Hūrae.

    Ka whiriwhirihia kotahi te whiti ia rā (tae atu ki te 200 kupu), mai i ia reanga, ka mutu hoki ngā pakiwaitara hei te ahiahi o te Paraire te 25 o Hūrae.

    Ko ngā Reanga: (Kura) Tau 1-8, me te Tau 9-13

    Ko ngā taonga ia rā he pēke whare pukapuka, he kāri koha, he haki pukapuka hoki.

    Ko ngā taonga mā ngā toa tuhituhi kotahi iPapa mō ia reanga, ā, he haki e $250 hei hoko pukapuka mō ngā kura o ngā toa tuhituhi.

    Ko te kura hoki he tokomaha rawa ana kaituhi ka wini hoki i te haki pukapuka e $250!

    Kia whai wāhi koe ki te wini, tūhono mai ā-ipurangi ka tuhituhi mai rā: wcl.govt.nz/mawhaituhi

     

    To celebrate Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori 2014, Wellington City Libraries are weaving an online story, with the chance for you and your school to win some cool prizes.

    Well-known author, Paora Tibble, has written the first paragraph but we need you to continue the story each day, from 21-25 July.

    A paragraph (up to 200 words) will be selected, daily, from each age group, and the stories will finish on Friday afternoon, 25 July.

    Age Groups are: (School) Year 1-8, and Year 9-13

    Daily prizes include library bags, concession cards and book vouchers.

    The prizes for overall winners include an iPad for each age group winner, plus $250 of book vouchers for the winners’ schools.

    The school with the most contributors will also win $250 of book vouchers!

    For your chance to win, join us online and weave your story: wcl.govt.nz/mawhaituhi


  • Books, Internet, Library Serf, Writing

    How is a book made?

    10.06.13 | Permalink | Comments Off on How is a book made?

    Ever wondered what goes into producing a book? Lauren Oliver, author of the bestselling Delirium trilogy, explains all about it in this series of videos, from coming up with an idea to printing and promoting.


  • Events, Happenings, Library Serf

    Free Writing Workshop with Mal Peet

    05.06.13 | Permalink | Comments Off on Free Writing Workshop with Mal Peet

    Mal Peet, award-winning author of Tamar, Exposure, and Life: An Unexploded Diagram is in Wellington this month, and he’ll be the guest star at a free, one-off workshop at the central library. The details are:

    Sunday 16 June, 1 to 4pm
    Wellington Central Library
    To register, email sarah@bookcouncil.org.nz

    “Most of us learn to write by stealing from other writers. This event is an invitation to aspiring writers to do some serious shoplifting.” (Mal Peet)


  • New Zealand, NZ Book Month, Rachel and Rebecca

    A short post about short stories

    28.03.13 | Permalink | Comments Off on A short post about short stories

    We promise, absolutely and completely, that this is our last post about New Zealand Book Month. For this year at least. We hope you’ve read something New Zealand related this month or better yet, been to an event! If you haven’t, never fear, there’s still time (and a long weekend) to do so. Why not check out some New Zealand short stories, it will take mere minutes and the library has some great collections!

    book cover courtesy of SyndeticsEssential New Zealand Short Stories, edited by Owen Marshall

    The contents page of this collection reads as a who’s who of New Zealand writing greats including Katherine Mansfield, Janet Frame, Patricia Grace, Joy Cowley, Maurice Gee, Frank Sargeson and many, many more. The collected works span 80 years which demonstrates the way short stories, as a genre, have changed over time (or not). In his introduction Owen Marshall says the reason short stories can be found right through New Zealand writing history is because “they form a resilient genre with its own idiosyncratic pulse of literary energy.” We have to agree! There’s a certain charming idiosyncrasy right through this collection and all the others as well.

    book cover courtesy of SyndeticsEarthless Trees, edited by Pauline Frances

    This collection features the work of several young refugees who came to New Zealand seeking security and freedom with their families. From an escape through mountains on an overloaded truck, to living through an explosion in urban Kabul, these stories touch on universal themes: survival, family, home and friends. We love that this collection gives a poignant and, at times, heartbreaking, insight into the lives of some of our refugees.

    book cover courtesy of SyndeticsLike Wallpaper, edited by Barbara Else

    The authors featured in this collection are a combination of established like David Hill or Fleur Beale and stunning newcomers like Natasha Lewis and Samantha Stanley. The settings are New Zealand homes and flats, local schools and roads, beaches, rivers, cities. There is a mixture of tone, voice, and form. Issues addressed in the stories range across aspects of peer pressure and friendship. Parents and family relationships feature as do young romance, sexuality, and death. All in all, it’s a capacious collection with several quirky stories you’re bound to love. Hopefully ponder as well.

    book cover courtesy of Syndetics50 short short stories by young New Zealanders edited by Graeme Lay

    Tandem Press invited New Zealanders aged 18 and under to submit a short story (no more than 500 words) for a writing competition. This collection is the 50 best entries they received. They provide a much broader overview than Earthless Trees of what being a teenager is like in New Zealand and over the course of fifty stories, the themes covered include all the joys and concerns of daily life: peer pressure, rivalry, first love, and questions of identity and belonging; of moving or subtle relationships with friends and family. These are great to read if you’re an aspiring writer yourself because they give an idea of the kind of style and content that one publishing house consider to be good.

    Think you can do better? Then a list of writing competitions in New Zealand can be found here including details about the Re-Draft competition. The winners of that are published annually, several collections of which the library has here, here and here. However they don’t get a blurb of their own because they include poetry and because we promised a short post. So there you have it. Short stories are the best! They get to the point within the time of my attention span, they’re often strange and quirky and, best of all, they leave you wondering. And there we will end our very last post about New Zealand Book Month. May you now dazzle your friends and family with your knowledge of homegrown literary talent!

    Happy Easter!

    R n R


  • Happenings, Writing

    Writing Workshop with Fleur Beale

    20.03.13 | Permalink | Comments Off on Writing Workshop with Fleur Beale

    If you’re interested in creative writing, then read on!

    The Children’s Bookshop in Kilbirnie is hosting an afternoon’s writing workshop for teenagers with the great Fleur Beale on Sunday the 28th of April. Places are very limited, so be in quick and email books@thechildrensbookshop.co.nz – you can also visit their Facebook page for more information (time, cost etc.).


  • Internet, Library Serf, Writing

    More successful teen authors

    02.10.12 | Permalink | Comments Off on More successful teen authors

    It’s well known that it’s very hard to get your book published. Some writers slave away for years before their first success, while some fortunate and talented people get published as teens. A little while ago we did an investigation into the teen publishing phenomenon, the result being this Top 10 list.

    The trend is still continuing, thanks to the success of Alexandra Adornetto (Halo), Kody Keplinger (The DUFF) and others, as are spotlighted in this YALSA article.

    The article has also got some suggestions for websites for aspiring writers, so it’s well worth a read if you love writing.

    Which reminds us, it’s just one month from Nanowrimo (“thirty days and nights of literary abandon”), where you get to attempt to write a novel in 30 days (while still keeping on top of NCEA).


  • Competition, Library Serf, Writing

    Re-Draft 2012

    17.09.12 | Permalink | Comments Off on Re-Draft 2012

    Re-Draft is an annual writing competition for teenagers organised by the School for Young Writers in Christchurch, and it’s now on!

    Entries close on the 30th of September, and the entry form for the competition is here. The best entries get published in the annual Re-Draft anthology (which gets named after one of the stories in the collection).

    This year’s judges are Tessa Duder and James Norcliffe, who are, we are told, really looking forward to seeing what this year’s entrants have to offer.

    We have some previous years’ anthologies in the library.


  • Adrienne, Events, Writing

    Reminder- Writing Class With John Marsden

    02.08.11 | Permalink | Comments Off on Reminder- Writing Class With John Marsden

    This has nearly sold out; only a few places left. Hurry, hurry.

    Dets: Saturday 13th August, 10-12pm, Wellington Central Library (mezzanine room, near Clarkes Cafe), $30.

    To book: 04 387 3905 or childbkwgtn@xtra.co.nz


  • Adrienne, Events, Writing

    A Writing Master Class with John Marsden

    27.07.11 | Permalink | Comments Off on A Writing Master Class with John Marsden

    Wellington City Libraries, The Children’s Bookshop and MacMillan Publishers announce

    A Writing Master Class for Teenagers with John Marsden.

    Best-selling Australian author and teacher John Marsden (author of the Tomorrow when the War Began series) will be presenting a writing class for young writers as a fund raiser for Christchurch.

    Saturday 13th August 10am to 12pm, Wellington City Library, Victoria St. (Mezzanine Floor), for 13-18yr olds.

    Cost $30 -at the request of John Marsden all proceeds will go to the Red Cross Christchurch Earthquake Appeal.

    Strictly limited to the first 30 people on a first come/first served basis- to book please contact the Children’s Bookshop, Shop 26, Kilbirnie Plaza, Kilbirnie, Wellington.  

    t: 04 3873905

    f: 04 3873288

    e: childbkwgtn@xtra.co.nz


  • Adrienne, Events, Happenings, Pencil it in your diaries, Writing

    Creative Writing Workshop

    07.07.11 | Permalink | Comments Off on Creative Writing Workshop

    Fancy yourself as a bit of a writer?

    Register now for a place at the Creative Writing Workshop, places are limited, so be quick about it.

    28th July at Karori Library, 10 am – 3 pm, $40. Email juliafletcher113@hotmail.com to book. For 13-18 year olds.


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