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Art




  • Art, Comics, GLBT, Happenings, Movies, NZ Music Month, Wellington

    Winging Your Way Way Through The Weekend, 1-2 June

    30.05.13 | Permalink | Comments Off on Winging Your Way Way Through The Weekend, 1-2 June

    Kia ora folks!

    Wintry splendour is raining down on us with things to do this weekend. It’s a pretty special one because we get one more day than usual – sweet! It’s the Queens Birthday (but not really, her real birthday’s in April. We’re just kind minions and let her have two). One way you could spend your extra day off is revelling in the glory of our monarch or you could do some of these things:

    Te Papa re-opens the Visa Platinum Gallery with an Andy Warhol exhibit. “Warhol: Immortal” celebrates Mr. Pop Art himself. He did all sorts of really great things and liked Campbells Soup too. Not to be confused with The Dandy Warhols.

    Geeks unite! The closest thing to a Comic-Con on our shores, Armageddon, visits Wellington for the first time this year.

    Less Dance Dance Revolution more… real dance? Stage Challenge/J-Rock hit Wellington (starting tonight).

    Another Film Festival is in town. Out Takes with the pun-tastic byline, “reel queer film festival” is screening a few choice youth flicks.

    Maybe you’re one of the fine few who aren’t having a “weekend” and are instead working it away? Here’s an endgame for those hard earned pingers – they’re building Springfield!

    To end NZ Music Month Shapeshifter release “Delta” just in time for the weekend playlist.

    Later!


  • Art, Books, Miss A. Laney

    Cover twins

    16.04.13 | Permalink | Comments Off on Cover twins

    Book cover courtesy of Syndetics Book cover courtesy of Syndetics

    The Assassin’s Curse by Cassandra Rose Clarke and Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Saenz. Both these books had been rattling about in my brain for a wee while and I finally managed to think of them side by side. Having looked at them both closely, the font actually isn’t identical but it does look extremely similar! After some further investigation, I think they were both drawn by Sarah J. Coleman who has done some really awesome work (check out her website here) and a whole bunch of great book covers which have the distinct mark of her work! She certainly has a new fan over here at the teen blog!

    Oh and as for the books themselves, we’ve read both of them over here and both of them were great. Thumbs up!


  • Art, Isn't that cool?, Library Serf, Not Library Related, Science!

    Cool Space Photos

    06.03.12 | Permalink | Comments Off on Cool Space Photos

    If you shoot a satellite into space, give it a camera and nothing better to do, it takes really great photos of earth.

    Some highlights: Ireland, complete with aqua-coloured plankton blooms, the Hawaiian Islands, and the Great Barrier Reef.

    (Found via metafilter)


  • Art, Books, Library Serf

    Book Cover Lookalikes: Spilt Pearls

    07.12.11 | Permalink | Comments Off on Book Cover Lookalikes: Spilt Pearls

    On the subject of cover themes, Mel commented that She’s So Dead to Us and Black Tuesday have almost identical covers. So true! Here they are:

      

    Let us know if you spot any more.

    We’re currently on the lookout for Steampunk goggles.


  • Art, Happenings, Library Serf

    See Some European Masters for Free

    26.01.11 | Permalink | Comments Off on See Some European Masters for Free

    On Thursday the 3rd of February you can see the European Masters exhibition at Te Papa for free: all you need to do is confirm you’re a Wellington resident (your Wellington City Libraries library card will do for this), oh and also be prepared for a queue (especially if you’re going after school)!

    See paintings by Picasso, Munch, Renoir and many more: for more information on the exhibition visit the Te Papa site here.


  • Art, Competition, Library Serf

    Library week comps

    24.07.10 | Permalink | Comments Off on Library week comps

    Library Week is coming up, and they are running a graphic novel competition. There are two age groupings! One for teens, and one for adults. You only need to add four frames to the continuing story to enter, and it begins on Monday, the 26th (and finishes on the 20th of August, during Library Week).

    There are other competitions you can enter as well.


  • Art, Grimm

    Book Covers: Hands and Glass

    13.07.10 | Permalink | Comments Off on Book Covers: Hands and Glass

    Is there something secretive and maybe a bit thriller-ish, spectral, about books with mysterious shadowy hands and/or glass? Perhaps, mostly: here are some book covers we thought looked like they shared some genes.

    Wish You Were Dead, by Todd Strasser: someone writes on their blog that they hate Lucy and they wish she was dead, and lo and behold, Lucy mysteriously disappears. Then another, and another. Madison must try and find out what’s going on, while dodging social networking threats.

    Chasing Brooklyn, Lisa Schroeder: another novel in verse by the writer of I Heart You, You Haunt Me. Lucca is accidentally killed by Gabe in a traffic accident, and Gabe, guilt-stricken, commits suicide. Brooklyn and Nico are haunted by their ghosts, and each must find out what the spirits are demanding.

    Beautiful Malice, Rebecca James: a really good psychological thriller, told in alternating past and present storylines. Katherine is starting over after a family tragedy and meets the magnetic Alice at her new school. Alice is gregarious, beautiful, popular, and perhaps a little bit dangerous. We know from the first sentence of the book that Alice is dead, but the question is why.

    Black Box by Julie Schumacher: not so much a thriller, but a story about depression. Elena’s sister and best friend Dora is hospitalised with depression, and when she gets out she’s quite different, skipping school and lying. Elena has to deal with her feelings of guilt about her sister’s illness, and the seemingly new person Dora has become.


  • Art, Grimm, Library

    Into Photography?

    08.07.09 | Permalink | Comments Off on Into Photography?

    Are you studying Photography or just keen and naturally talented? We asked Françoise, library staff member and photographer, about photography books and resources and she’s given us a list (yay, list) of recommended reading and viewing.

    1 The Genius of Photography, by Gerry Badger (770.9 BAD)
    This landmark book explores the key events and images that have marked the development of photography. What is it that makes a photograph by Nan Goldin or Henri Cartier Bresson stand out among the millions of others taken by all of us every single day? The Genius of Photography examines the evolution of photography in its wider context: social, political, economic, technological and artistic. A great reference book on this evermore influential artform.

    2 A Century of Colour Photography, by Pamela Roberts (770.9 ROB)
    This comprehensive collection offers fine examples of the art of colour photography, covering every major technical and artistic development in colour photography over the last 100 years, since the Lumière brothers made the autochrome process commercially available in June 1907.

    3 Contemporary New Zealand Photographers, by Hannah Holm & Lara Strongman (770.9931 CON)
    Designed to accompany the exhibition that toured New Zealand in 2006, this book is a must for anybody interested in photography today in New Zealand. All the major contemporary photographers of the country are featured here with text and some key images. An essential reference.

    4 Magnum (779 MAG)
    Founded in 1947 by Henri Cartier-Bresson, Robert Capa and other eminent photographers, Magnum is an agency of elected photojournalists who independently photograph what they choose rather than what they are assigned. Regarded as the best of their profession, their images can have a lasting impact on viewers and be truly inspirational. Magnumdegree is a book about history and humanity, journalism and art, offering a vision of the contemporary world at the beginning of the new millennium. It contains over 600 colour and black-and-white photographs by 69 Magnum photographers, including original contributions from Cartier-Bresson.

    5 Street & Studio: An Urban History of Photography, by Ute Eskilden, Florian Ebner and Bettina Kaufmann (779.2 STR)
    The street allows photographers to conceal cameras and catch subjects unaware, in informal settings. By contrast, the studio permits both photographers and subjects to present carefully composed images to the world through elaborate staging and technical tricks. Street and Studio provides a revealing look at the history of photography through the contrasts and tensions between these two traditions.

    6 The Polaroid Book, by Steve Crist and Barbara Hitchcock (779 POL)
    In existence for over 50 years, the Polaroid Corporation’s photography collection is the greatest collection of Polaroid images in the world. Begun by Polaroid founder Edwin Land and photographer Ansel Adams, the collection now includes images by hundreds of photographers throughout the world and contains important pieces by artists such as David Hockney, Helmut Newton, Jeanloup Sieff and Robert Rauschenberg. The Polaroid Book, a survey of this remarkable collection, pays tribute to a medium that defies the digital age and remains a favourite among artists for its quirky look and instantly gratifying, one-of-a-kind images.

    7 Digital Photography Masterclass, by Tom Ang (775 ANG)
    One of Britain’s best-known photographers, Ang has hosted a popular BBC TV series called A Digital Picture of Britain and won the Thomas Cook Travel Book Award. In this book, the author teaches how to look at the world with a photographer’s eye and offers tutorials, photographic assignments, and step-by-step image-manipulation exercises. A perfect introduction for budding photographers.

    8 Fashion & Advertising, by Magdalene Keaney (778.92 KEA)
    In these workshops, World’s Top Photographers discuss and explore the technical and artistic aspects of photographer: lighting, composition, colour, tone and imaging. Stunning images and in-depth interviews plus checklists and tips-and-hints panels make this book a beautiful and practical manual.

    9 Henri Cartier-Bresson in India, by Henri Cartier-Bresson (779.9954)
    From 1947 through the 1980s, founder of Magnum, Henri Cartier-Bresson photographed all aspects of India’s multi-facetted society, from refugee camps to the Maharaja of Barodea’s birthday celebration. His gift of observation and connections infuse all these photos, revealing the essence of a country that has captured the world’s imagination.

    10 Handboek: Ans Westra Photographs, by Ans Westra, Luit Bieringa and Cushla Parekowhai (770.92 WES)
    Born in the Netherlands, Ans Westra came to New Zealand in 1957. In a few short years she was to embark on her life-long photographic journey documenting the lives and cultures of New Zealanders. This book is an in-depth insight into more than 130 documentary images by one of the most influential photographers of this country.

    11 Life, by Lennart Nilsson (779.949611 NIL)
    Lennart Nilsson took the first image of a living human embryo in the 1960s and stunned the world. Life is an amazing book of images documenting human life from DNA through fetal development and birth. The second half of the book focuses on the human body, its organs, tissues, and the things that eventually threaten life – bacteria and viruses. Science meets Art in this incredible journey to the centre of the human body.

    12 Pictures from the Surface of the Earth, by Wim Wenders, Peter-Klaus Schuster and Nicole Hartje (779 WEN)
    For many years, famous German Wim Wenders (Wings of Desire, Buena Vista Social Club) has taken an old panorama camera along with him on his travels. The result is a collection of landscapes and cityscapes, photographs of architecture and nature where few humans appear, taken in the United States, Japan, Australia, Israel, Cuba and Germany.

    13 Africa, by Sebastiao Salgado (779.996 SAL)
    This stunning book, entirely in black and white, is a photographic document of Africa by Sebastiao Salgado, but also a homage to the history, people, and natural phenomena of this continent. Renowned Mozambique novelist Mia Couto describes how today’s Africa reflects the effects of colonisation as well as the consequences of economic, social, and environmental crises. Moving and inspiring.

    Françoise has also kindly subcategorised them for us like so –

    • General (Historical, Overview, Theme): 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
    • Techniques, How-to: 7, 8
    • Individual Artists: 9, 10, 11, 12, 13
    • New Zealand: 3, 10

    Want more?
    Visit the library Art Resources page for books, magazines, useful websites and other tools, including art-related online databases. Oxford Art Online, for example, is great for searching for biographical information on famous photographers (you’ll need to enter your library card number and surname to access).


  • Art, Simon

    Papier Arbeiten

    13.05.09 | Permalink | Comments Off on Papier Arbeiten

    Besides having a great name, Simon Schubert creates some incredible art simply* by folding paper. Something you can try to imitate at home, or at school, or on the train to school. Or home. Whenever.

    *Probably not at all simple, really.


  • Art, Isn't that cool?, Simon

    Buses.

    10.03.09 | Permalink | Comments Off on Buses.

    You know how buses often have those advertisments stuck to the sides of them? Here’s a page full of some of the better and more clever ads on buses from around the world.


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