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December 2014

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  • Books, Chloe

    Book Cover Lookalikes: Wings

    27.12.14 | Permalink | Comments Off on Book Cover Lookalikes: Wings

    In the spirit of all your potential jet-setting over the holidays, this week’s theme is: Wings and feathers and angels, oh my!

    Heaven book coverEmbrace book coverHalo book coverThe Dream Thieves book coverAdvent book coverThe Raven Boys book coverHush, Hush book coverLeviathan book coverSilence book coverAngelology book coverRed Rising book coverWings book cover


  • Fashion Friday, Style Catalogue

    Fashion Photos

    19.12.14 | Permalink | Comments Off on Fashion Photos

    fbk

    So. This is not a fashion book. But, it is a great way to get all your fashion pics looking better than ever, and just in time for the party season!

    Syndetics book coverPicture perfect social media : a handbook for styling perfect photos for posting, blogging, and sharing / [Jennifer Young].
    This book is full of useful information for making your photos look awesome – from how to use the light properly, to making the most out of your smartphone camera. Just perfect if you’re planning to photograph those special moments / outfits / friends / family these holidays. And for boosting your selfie game!


  • Books, Comedy, Environment, Espionage, Graphic Novels, Nicola

    New books

    19.12.14 | Permalink | Comments Off on New books

    Book cover courtesy of SyndeticsIn real life, Lawrence Tabak

    Fifteen-year-old math prodigy Seth Gordon knows exactly what he wants to do with his life—play video games. Every spare minute is devoted to honing his skills at Starfare, the world’s most popular computer game. His goal: South Korea, where the top pros are rich and famous. But the best players train all day, while Seth has school and a job and divorced parents who agree on only one thing: “Get off that damn computer.” Plus there’s a new distraction named Hannah, an aspiring photographer who actually seems to understand his obsession.
    While Seth mopes about his tournament results and mixed signals from Hannah, Team Anaconda, one of the leading Korean pro squads, sees something special. Before he knows it, it’s goodbye Kansas, goodbye Hannah, and hello to the strange new world of Korea. But the reality is more complicated than the fantasy, as he faces cultural shock, disgruntled teammates, and giant pots of sour-smelling kimchi. What happens next surprises Seth. Slowly, he comes to make new friends, and discovers what might be a breakthrough, mathematical solution to the challenges of Starcraft. Delving deeper into the formulas takes him in an unexpected direction, one that might just give him a new focus—and reunite him with Hannah. (Goodreads)

    First lines: School called. Again. Unexcused absence, blah, blah blah. My interception rate on these calls is eighty-four percent (This is Seth’s father, how can I help you?) But they called Dad while I was at Mom’s.

    Book cover courtesy of SyndeticsSkink no surrender, Carl Hiaasen

    Classic Malley—to avoid being shipped off to boarding school, she takes off with some guy she met online. Poor Richard—he knows his cousin’s in trouble before she does. Wild Skink—he’s a ragged, one-eyed ex-governor of Florida, and enough of a renegade to think he can track Malley down. With Richard riding shotgun, the unlikely pair scour the state, undaunted by blinding storms, crazed pigs, flying bullets, and giant gators.

    First lines: I walked down to the beach and waited for Malley, but she didn’t show up. The ocean breeze felt warm. Two hours I say there on the sand – no Malley. In the beginning it was just annoying, but after a while I began to worry that something was wrong. My cousin, in spite of out all of her issues, is a punctual person.

    Book cover courtesy of SyndeticsJackaby, William Ritter

    Newly arrived in New Fiddleham, New England, 1892, and in need of a job, Abigail Rook meets R. F. Jackaby, an investigator of the unexplained with a keen eye for the extraordinary–including the ability to see supernatural beings. Abigail has a gift for noticing ordinary but important details, which makes her perfect for the position of Jackaby’s assistant. On her first day, Abigail finds herself in the midst of a thrilling case: A serial killer is on the loose. The police are convinced it’s an ordinary villain, but Jackaby is certain it’s a nonhuman creature, whose existence the police–with the exception of a handsome young detective named Charlie Cane–deny. (Goodreads)

    First lines: It was late January, and New England wore a fresh coat of snow as I stepped along the gangplank to the shore. The city of New Fiddleham glistened in the fading dusk, lamplight playing across the icy buildings that lined the waterfront, turning their brickwork to twinkling diamonds in the dark.

    Book cover courtesy of SyndeticsRites of passage, Joy N. Hensley

    Sam McKenna’s never turned down a dare. And she’s not going to start with the last one her brother gave her before he died.
    So Sam joins the first-ever class of girls at the prestigious Denmark Military Academy. She’s expecting push-ups and long runs, rope climbing and mud-crawling. As a military brat, she can handle an obstacle course just as well as the boys. She’s even expecting the hostility she gets from some of the cadets who don’t think girls belong there. What she’s not expecting is her fiery attraction to her drill sergeant. But dating is strictly forbidden and Sam won’t risk her future, or the dare, on something so petty…no matter how much she wants him. As Sam struggles to prove herself, she discovers that some of the boys don’t just want her gone—they will stop at nothing to drive her out. When their petty threats turn to brutal hazing, bleeding into every corner of her life, she realizes they are not acting alone. A decades-old secret society is alive and active… and determined to force her out. At any cost. (Goodreads)

    First lines: I’m physically incapable of saying no to a dare – I’ve got the scars and broken bone count to prove it. And that fatal flaw, Bad Habit #1, is the reason I’m sitting in the car with my parents right now, listening to some small-town radio DJ talk smack about me.

    Book cover courtesy of SyndeticsThe Mark of Cain, Lindsey Barraclough

    1567
    Aphra is not a normal child. Found abandoned as a baby among the reeds and rushes, the two outcast witches who raise her in their isolated cottage are never sure if she was born, or just pushed up through the foul, black mud for them to find. Little Aphra’s gifts in the dark craft are clear, even as an infant, but soon even her guardians begin to fear her. When a violent fire destroys their home, Aphra is left to fend for herself. Years of begging and stealing make her strong, but they also make her bitter, for she is shunned and feared by everyone she meets. Until she reaches Bryers Guerdon and meets the man they call Long Lankin – the leper. Ostracized and tormented, he is the only person willing to help her. And together, they plot their revenge.
    1962
    Four years have passed since the death of Ida Guerdon, and Cora is back in Bryers Guerdon in the manor house her aunt left to her. It is a cold, bitter winter, and the horrifying events of that sweltering summer in 1958 seem long past.
    Until Cora’s father arranges for some restoration work to take place at Guerdon Hall, and it seems that something hidden there long ago has been disturbed. The spirit of Aphra Rushes – intent on finishing what she began, four centuries ago.(Goodreads)

    First lines: We hurry through the wood along the narrow dirt path that runs by the edge of the brook. Zillah’s swollen-knuckled old fingers grip my small hand as I stumble alongside her.
    “Keep up, child. We have to make haste,” she urges. “It is not so good for us to be so close to the watermen. We must take care not to be seen.”

    Book cover courtesy of SyndeticsSchizo, Nic Sheff

    Miles is the ultimate unreliable narrator—a teen recovering from a schizophrenic breakdown who believes he is getting better . . . when in reality he is growing worse. Driven to the point of obsession to find his missing younger brother, Teddy, and wrapped up in a romance that may or may not be the real thing, Miles is forever chasing shadows. As Miles feels his world closing around him, he struggles to keep it open, but what you think you know about his world is actually a blur of gray, and the sharp focus of reality proves startling. (Goodreads)

    First lines: It’s starting again. There’s a sound like an airplane descending loudly in my ear. I can’t quite place it. The sweat is cold down my back. I feel my heart beat faster. My hands shake. God, I can’t take it.

    Graphic Novels

    Book cover courtesy of SyndeticsShe-Hulk #1: law and disorder, Charles Soule (writer), Javier Pulido and Ron Wimberly (artists)

    Jennifer Walters is the She-Hulk! A stalwart member of the Avengers and FF, she’s also a killer attorney with a pile of degrees and professional respect. But juggling cases and kicking bad guy butt is a little more complicated than she anticipated. With a new practice, a new paralegal and a mounting number of super villains she’s racking up as personal enemies, She Hulk might have bitten off more than she can chew! When Kristoff Vernard, the son of Victor Von Doom, seeks extradition, it’s an international jailbreak, She-Hulk-style! Then, She-Hulk and Hellcat must uncover the secrets of the Blue File — a conspiracy that touches the entire Marvel Universe! And when someone important to She-Hulk is killed, and won’t let it stand — but who can she trust? She-Hulk takes on her most terrifying role yet: defendant! (Goodreads)

    Book cover courtesy of SyndeticsThe Wrenchies, Farel Dalrymple

    Meet the Wrenchies.
    They’re strong, powerful, and if you cross them, things will quickly go very badly for you. Only one thing scares them—growing up. Because in the world of the Wrenchies, it’s only kids who are safe… anyone who survives to be an adult lives in constant fear of the Shadowsmen. All the teenagers who come into contact with them turn into twisted, nightmarish monsters whose minds are lost forever. When Hollis, an unhappy and alienated boy, stumbles across a totem that gives him access to the parallel world of the Wrenchies, he finally finds a place where he belongs. But he soon discovers that the feverish, post-apocalyptic world of the Wrenchies isn’t staying put… it’s bleeding into Hollis’s normal, real life. Things are getting very scary, very fast.


  • Books, Grimm, New

    Upcoming Fiction Recently Ordered

    18.12.14 | Permalink | Comments Off on Upcoming Fiction Recently Ordered

    More from series-world: beginnings, ends, sequels and bridging stories – all to look forward to in 2015.

    Fairest, Marissa Meyer. This is number 3.5 in the Lunar Chronicles. We are really looking forward to Winter (number 4, the book, not the season) which comes out at the end of next year, so it’s a happy thing that Fairest will be available in February to tide us over. Fairest tells the back story of Queen Levana (“Long before she crossed paths with Cinder, Scarlet, and Cress, Levana lived a very different story,” says goodreads.com, a big tease). The fairytale being referenced here is Snow White, with Levana being the Evil Queen (or is she?).

    The Winner’s Crime, Marie Rutkosky. The sequel to The Winner’s Curse, which was one of our picks for 2014. “The engagement of Lady Kestrel to Valoria’s crown prince means one celebration after another. But to Kestrel it means living in a cage of her own making. As the wedding approaches, she aches to tell Arin the truth about her engagement… if she could only trust him. Yet can she even trust herself? For – unknown to Arin – Kestrel is becoming a skilled practitioner of deceit: an anonymous spy passing information to Herran, and close to uncovering a shocking secret. As Arin enlists dangerous allies in the struggle to keep his country’s freedom, he can’t fight the suspicion that Kestrel knows more than she shows. In the end, it might not be a dagger in the dark that cuts him open, but the truth. And when that happens, Kestrel and Arin learn just how much their crimes will cost them” (goodreads.com).

    The Ruby Circle, Richelle Mead (the final Bloodlines novel). “Sydney Sage is an Alchemist, one of a group of humans who dabble in magic and serve to bridge the worlds of humans and vampires. They protect vampire secrets – and human lives. After their secret romance is exposed, Sydney and Adrian find themselves facing the wrath of both the Alchemists and the Moroi in this electrifying conclusion to Richelle Mead’s New York Times bestselling Bloodlines series. When the life of someone they both love is put on the line, Sydney risks everything to hunt down a deadly former nemesis. Meanwhile, Adrian becomes enmeshed in a puzzle that could hold the key to a shocking secret about spirit magic, a secret that could shake the entire Moroi world” (goodreads.com)

    Red Queen, Victoria Aveyard. The first in a new trilogy, and recommended for fans of The Hunger Games and Divergent. “The poverty stricken Reds are commoners, living under the rule of the Silvers, elite warriors with god-like powers. To Mare Barrow, a 17-year-old Red girl from The Stilts, it looks like nothing will ever change. Mare finds herself working in the Silver Palace, at the centre of those she hates the most. She quickly discovers that, despite her red blood, she possesses a deadly power of her own. One that threatens to destroy Silver control. But power is a dangerous game. And in this world divided by blood, who will win?” (goodreads.com)


  • Grimm, Librarian's Choice, Lists, Rachel

    Librarians’ choices of 2014 – the best of the best!

    16.12.14 | Permalink | Comments Off on Librarians’ choices of 2014 – the best of the best!

    Lots of neat books have been released in the past 12 months, and we’ve rounded up our very favourites of the bunch just for you. If you’re going to read anything from this year, give these a go.

    Read right to the bottom for a chance to WIN!

    Book cover from SyndeticsGrimm:

    Mortal Heart, Robin LaFevers – I have gone on a lot about the assassin nun books, but they are really good, honestly. In Mortal Heart Annith – who has taken a back seat in the previous two books – is desperately keen to prove herself as an assassin, but she’s foiled by the abbess’ plans for her to take over as the new convent seer. Annith must choose between being locked in a room in the convent for the rest of her life, or going against her vows and striking out on her own in search of the truth (which would you rather?).

    Book cover from SyndeticsI noticed my favourite book of last year was Mortal Fire by Elizabeth Knox, so I have a theme going now.

    I also liked:

    Blue lily, lily blue, Maggie Stiefvater – can’t say a lot about this book without ruining everything and spoiling things, except to say you should definitely read it, having first read The Raven Boys and The Dream Thieves. Don’t let the title (which I’m not a huge fan of) put you off.

    Book cover from SyndeticsRachel:

    I too loved Blue Lily, Lily Blue and I highly, highly recommend The Raven Cycle series as a whole.

    I also loved Noggin by John Corey Whaley which I picked up because I loved his first book Where Things Come Back. Noggin is about 16-year-old Travis Coates who dies, but is reanimated 5 years later with his cryogenically frozen head attached to a new body. Sounds goofy, but it’s really rather lovely and insightful.

    Book cover from SyndeticsA huge hit for me was Half Bad by Sally Green! I love a good unreliable narrator, and boy was Nathan unreliable. Nathan is a half-black, half-white (good/bad) witch, and is treated abysmally for it by everyone in the magical world. Largely because his black witch father is the most dark and terrible witch the world has ever known. And Nathan must find his father before his birthday, or he may lose his powers forever. It’s the first in a trilogy, and the next book, Half Wild, is due out in 2015.

    Book cover from SyndeticsMax:

    I really enjoyed Atlantia by Ally Condie! Rio lives in the underwater city of Atlantia, but has always dreamed of leaving. But her sister makes a decision unexpectedly which leaves Rio stranded and forced to find a way to save Atlantia from destruction.

    Although it didn’t come out this year, I also really enjoyed reading the Uglies series by Scott Westerfield.

    Monty:

    Once again, all predictably comics, not that I don’t read other stuff, really, y’know, books with print and all that, but these are some of my favourites from this year!

    Book cover from SyndeticsSilver Surfer 1: new dawn by Dan Slott

    Gently pokes fun at the po-faced Silver Surfer we know and respect with whacked out illustration by talented iZombie and Madman illustrator Michael Allred . Maybe, we can actually enjoy his silver headed company now?

    Afterlife with Archie by Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa

    This particular episode of the Archie stable of stories convincingly combines Riverdale’s famous teens, grubby colours with noir shading and… Zombies. Maybe cashing in on the undead thing somewhat but much better than it sounds.

    Book cover from SyndeticsDaredevil volume 2 by Mark Waid

    Mark Waid’s recent run on Daredevil has been like taking an uncomplicated step back in time. To when super heroes had best friends named Foggy, where Ant-man might guest star and fight for the brain of a dangerously sick DD and where danger and gloom might appear, but only fleetingly, to be cleverly resolved in an optimistic and rounded conclusion. Ah, old fashioned comic satisfaction.

    Book cover from SyndeticsFF Vol. 2: Family freakout by Matt Fraction

    “As the kids in the FF start growing apart, their adult supervision seems to be having some issues of their own. And when Dr. Doom ascends and the Council of Dooms girds for battle, it’s the eve of a war between the Future Foundation and Latveriaa. But is it also the beginning of the end for the fractious FF?” (Syndetics)

    Check out volume 1 if you haven’t already!

    Book cover from SyndeticsThis one summer by Mariko Tamaki

    Every summer Rose and her parents go to a beach house, and Rose gets to hang out there with her friend Windy. But this summer Rose’s parents won’t stop fighting, and it’s a good thing Rose and Windy have each other, because this summer won’t be like all the others.

    Ligia:

    Book cover from SyndeticsBook cover from SyndeticsI had a few favourites this year, including Minders by Michele Jaffe, Nearly Gone by Elle Cosimano, The winners curse by Marie Rutkoski, The geography of you and me by Jennifer E. Smith & Nil by Lynne Matson.

    Book cover from SyndeticsMinders by Michele Jaffe

    “Sadie Ames has been accepted to the prestigious Mind Corps Fellowship program, where she’ll spend six weeks as an observer inside the head of Ford, a troubled boy with a passion for the crumbling architecture of the inner city. There’s just one problem: Sadie’s fallen in love with him. Ford Winters is haunted by the murder of his older brother, James. As Sadie begins to think she knows him, Ford does something unthinkable. Now, back in her own body, Sadie must decide what is right and what is wrong… and how well she can really ever know someone…” (Syndetics)

    Book cover from SyndeticsThe geography of you and me by Jennifer E. Smith

    “Sparks fly when sixteen-year-old Lucy Patterson and seventeen-year-old Owen Buckley meet on an elevator rendered useless by a New York City blackout. Soon after, the two teenagers leave the city, but as they travel farther away from each other geographically, they stay connected emotionally, in this story set over the course of one year.” (Syndetics)

    Book cover from SyndeticsNil by Lynne Matson

    “On the mysterious island of Nil, the rules are set. You have one year. Exactly 365 days to escape, or you die. Lost and alone, Charley finds no sign of other people until she meets Thad, the gorgeous leader of a clan of teenage refugees. Soon Charley learns that leaving the island is harder than she thought… and so is falling in love. With Thad’s time running out, Charley realizes that to save their future, Charley must first save him. And on an island rife with dangers, their greatest threat is time.” (Goodreads)

    Book cover from SyndeticsBook cover from SyndeticsRaissa:

    Although they didn’t come out in 2014, I really enjoyed the Fault in Our Stars by John Green and Marcelo in the Real World by Francisco X. Stork.

    Book cover from SyndeticsRaewyn:

    Julie Kagawa is one of my favourite authors and I have just finished reading Talon (could one of your closest friends be a dragon in disguise?). I liked it and would probably say loved it, except that I had read a series by Sophie Jordan about the same subject and similar scenarios (Firelight series) so it already felt a little familiar. Both were very good though!

    Book cover from SyndeticsOttilie:

    It wasn’t released this year (in fact, it came out in 1989!) but I absolutely adored Weetzie Bat by Francesca Lia Block. It is so dreamy and fairy-tale-like, but so contemporary and doesn’t firmly cement itself in the 80s. The book has such a dreamy, hazy yet vibrant atmosphere and I lived in the haze of it for a few weeks after finishing it!

    Debbie:

    Book cover from SyndeticsBook cover from SyndeticsI just finished The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey and I thought it was great! Plus, it’s being made into a movie soon, so I’m excited about that. I also enjoyed the Shadowfell series by Juliet Marillier — Shadowfell, Raven Flight and The Caller.

    Book cover from SyndeticsBelinda:

    I really enjoyed Like No Other by Una LaMarche from this year. Set in Brooklyn, it’s about a comedy/drama about a disapproved-upon teenage romance between a Hasidic Jew girl and a Black boy set contemporarily. There is a history of race riots between the two communities which adds another layer beyond the religious conflict. Both main characters could be described as Manic Pixie Dream Girl/Boys. I’d highly recommend it!

    Sylvia:

    Book cover from SyndeticsI Am Rebecca, by Fleur Beale was very good. It’s the follow up to her novel I Am Not Esther which came out 10 years ago.

    “When she turns 14, Rebecca will find out who she is to marry. All the girls in her strict religious sect must be married just after their 16th birthday. Her twin sister Rachel is delighted when Saul, the boy she loves, asks to marry her. Malachi asks for Rebecca. She believes him to be a good and godly man. But will Rebecca find there is a dark side to the rules which have kept her safe? What does the future hold? Can the way ahead be so simple when the community is driven by secrets and hidden desires?” (Syndetics)

    So that’s our roundup of 2014 favourites! It is by no means complete, just some of our faves that sprung to mind. We would love for you to share with us your favourite books of 2014, whether they were actually released this year or not. Let us know in the comments below! We will pick a commenter on this post to win an audiobook of Cassandra Clare’s City of Heavenly Fire so tell us your top picks!


  • Classic novels, Great Reads, Horror, Librarian's Choice, Nicola, Nostalgia

    Nik’s Picks: Ghost stories for Christmas

    16.12.14 | Permalink | Comments Off on Nik’s Picks: Ghost stories for Christmas

    Reading ghost stories at Christmas was a bit of a tradition in Victorian England. As a lover of all things horror I am keen to see this revived; there’s nothing like sitting down with a chilling tale, although I must admit reading ghost stories in the middle of an English winter is very different to reading them in the height of Summer! Be warned: these are not for those of a delicate constitution.

    Book cover courtesy of SyndeticsThe time of the ghost, Diana Wynne Jones

    Ghost stories told from the perspective of the ghost themselves aren’t a rare trope in supernatural fiction, but this book is a cut above the rest. The ghost doesn’t know who she is; she suspects that she is one of four sisters and that she has travelled back in time to prevent something terrible from happening. Something that stems from a not-so-innocent game that the girls play. It also deals with a degree of real-life horror: the girls are actively neglected by their own parents, and their futures seem grim if the evil force cannot be quieted. It’s a subtle, creepy book, rather different from the author’s usual work. I read it again, recently, and found it as disturbing as it was when I read it as a teenager.

    Book cover courtesy of SyndeticsScary stories – short story collection

    This is a group of creepy stories from some of the greats of horror literature: Stephen King, Bram Stoker, Edgar Allan Poe and H.P Lovecraft. There are also some more obscure writers, but each story is excellent and a worthy introduction to each writers’ work. What lifts this above other collections is the haunting illustrations by Barry Moser. They’re simple, black and white drawings that chillingly depict some faucet of the story.

    Book cover courtesy of SyndeticsThe turning, Francine Prose

    This book is based off The Turn of the Screw, a novella written in 1898 by Henry James. Like the original, the narrator is sent to a strange house to look after some children. It’s been updated, however: the narrator is now male, a teenager and the story has a contemporary setting. I don’t want to give too much away, but the book asks interesting questions about just how reliable the narrator is – is he actually seeing ghosts, or are they something more sinister from something deep within his own mind? Read this and then read the original, which is here.

    Book cover courtesy of SyndeticsOn the day I died, Candace Fleming

    Mike Kowalski decides to pick up a strange girl on his way home, only for her to take him to a nearby cemetery. He is greeted by nine teenage ghosts, each with their own story to tell. This book is haunting not just because of the poignant, strange or downright terrifying tales of each of the ghosts, but the fact that many are based on real incidents from Chicago’s history – the setting for this story and almost a character in its own right.

    Book cover courtesy of SyndeticsA Christmas Carol, Charles Dickens

    I couldn’t go past the one that started it all, of course! A Christmas Carol was published in 1843, and has undergone many productions and reinterpretations since then. My favourite film version is The Muppet Christmas Carol, and my favourite book is the one pictured here: sure, Quentin Blake isn’t the scariest of artists, but his art’s gorgeous and suits the story very well. You’re never too old to enjoy a story well told, I think!


  • Books, Grimm, Most Wanted

    Most Wanted: December 2014

    11.12.14 | Permalink | Comments Off on Most Wanted: December 2014

    These are what people are most interested in in the Young Adult collection at the moment just now. 2014 has been the year of the movie, but! There is a new entry that doesn’t come with a movie (although it is by a YouTube sensation, so kind of sort of nearly): Girl Online. This deserves a book cover pic, to the right. And we’ll be getting a few more copies.

    1. The Maze Runner, James Dashner [no change]
    2. The Scorch Trials, James Dashner [no change]
    3. The Fault in Our Stars, John Green [up 1]
    4=. Girl Online: the First Novel by Zoella, Zoe Sugg [new]
    4=. The Hunger Games, Suzanne Collins [again, again]
    6=. Minecraft: construction handbook [down 3]
    6=. Divergent, Veronica Roth [no change]
    8=. Insurgent, Veronica Roth [up]
    8=. Allegiant, Veronica Roth [up]
    10. Paper Towns, John Green [back again]

     


  • Lists, Rachel

    It’s time for a summer romance

    09.12.14 | Permalink | Comments Off on It’s time for a summer romance

    It’s officially summer and to kick off the season we’ve got some appropriately fluffy summer romance novels for you. If you want your heartstrings tugged – in summer! – you’ve come to the right place.

    Syndetics book coverAlong for the ride, Sarah Dessen

    “It’s been so long since Auden slept at night. Ever since her parents divorce, or since the fighting started. Now she has the chance to spend the summer with her dad and his new family in a charming beach town. A job in a clothes boutique introduces Auden to the world of girls: their talk, their friendship, their crushes. She missed out on all that, too busy being the perfect daughter to her demanding mother. Then she meets Eli, an intriguing loner and a fellow insomniac who becomes her guide to the nocturnal world of the town. Together they embark on parallel quests: for Auden, to experience the carefree teenage life she has been denied; for Eli, to come to terms with the guilt he feels for the death of a friend.” (Syndetics)

    Syndetics book coverTwenty boy summer, Sarah Ockler

    According to Anna’s best friend, Frankie, twenty days in Zanzibar Bay is the perfect opportunity to have a summer fling, and if they meet one boy every day, there’s a pretty good chance Anna will find her first summer romance. Anna lightheartedly agrees to the game, but there’s something she hasn’t told Frankie–she’s already had her romance, and it was with Frankie’s older brother, Matt, just before his tragic death one year ago.” (Goodreads)

    Syndetics book coverGreat, Sara Benincasa

    “Naomi Rye usually dreads spending the summer with her socialite mother in East Hampton. This year is no different. She sticks out like a sore thumb among the teenagers who have been summering (a verb only the very rich use) together for years. But Naomi finds herself captivated by her mysterious next-door neighbor, Jacinta. But Jacinta’s carefully constructed world is hiding something huge, a secret that could undo everything. And Naomi must decide how far she is willing to be pulled into this web of lies and deception before she is unable to escape.

    Based on beloved classic The Great Gatsby, Great has all the drama, glitz, and romance with a terrific modern (and scandalous) twist to enthrall readers.

    Syndetics book coverOne man guy, Michael Barakiva

    “When it appears that Alek is going to fall off the Honor Track at school, the 14-year-old’s strict Armenian parents, for whom education is of paramount importance, insist he go to summer school. Little do they or he know that it will be a life-changing experience. For it is there that he meets Ethan, who epitomizes cool. To Alek’s amazement, the two become friends and then fall in love. But when Alek’s parents predictably find the two making out, they ground him and forbid him to see Ethan again. Surely, this can’t end well. Or can it?” (Booklist)

    Syndetics book coverTo all the boys I’ve loved before, Jenny Han

    “Lara Jean writes plenty of love letters, but she never sends them. It’s just her way of moving on from a crush. When her secret box of letters goes missing and she discovers they’ve been mailed including one to her sister’s ex-boyfriend Lara Jean has to come face-to-face with her past and in the process learn more about her future.” (Booklist)

     

    Syndetics book coverTeen idol, Meg Cabot

    When teenage heartthrob Luke Stryker shows up at a small-town Indiana high school to do research for a movie role, he persuades junior Jenny Greenley to use her considerable talents to try to change things at school for the better.” (Goodreads)


  • Books, Comedy, dystopia, Espionage, Exclusive academies for rich kids who form cliques, Graphic Novels, Horror, New, Nicola, Non-fiction

    New books

    09.12.14 | Permalink | Comments Off on New books

    Book cover courtesy of SyndeticsFirebug, Lish McBride

    Ava is a firebug—she can start fires with her mind. Which would all be well and good if she weren’t caught in a deadly contract with the Coterie, a magical mafia. She’s one of their main hit men . . . and she doesn’t like it one bit. Not least because her mother’s death was ordered by Venus—who is now her boss. When Venus asks Ava to kill a family friend, Ava rebels. She knows very well that you can’t say no to the Coterie and expect to get away with it, though, so she and her friends hit the road, trying desperately to think of a way out of the mess they find themselves in. Preferably keeping the murder to a minimum. (Goodreads)

    First lines: Ryan slammed the book shut and tipped his head back, sprawling on the bench and claiming it as his own. I looked down at my lap, his current pillow, and shook my head.
    “It’s cheating.”
    “I’m not asking you to write the paper for me, Ava. Just engage in a lively discussion about the book.”

    Book cover courtesy of SyndeticsHero Complex, Margaux Froley

    Less than a month has passed since Devon Mackintosh uncovered the truth about the apparent suicide of Keaton’s golden boy and her unrequited love, Hutch. But that doesn’t mean the danger is over. Her own life has been threatened. Solving Hutch’s case only unearthed more questions: what lies beneath the Keaton land that could be so valuable as to tear the Hutchins family apart? Hutch’s grandfather, Reed Hutchins, knows the answer. But Reed is dying of cancer, and this dark family secret might die with him. Faced with no other option, Devon swipes Reed’s diary and plunges into his life as an 18-year-old science prodigy in the immediate aftermath of Pearl Harbor. Through his adolescent eyes—and his role in biological weapons research, still classified to this day—Devon fights to piece together the final clues to what haunts the Keaton hillsides, the truth Reed’s enemies are still willing to kill for. (Goodreads)

    First lines: The limo had seemed excessive. That was before Devon boarded the 250-foot mega yacht- where she handed her overnight bag to her personal butler, slipped on a hand-beaded Marchesa gown, and requested a sing from the children’s choir singing the Rolling Stones catalogue: “Moonlight Mile.” It seemed an appropriate song for the moonlight waters of the San Francisco Bay on New Years Eve.

    Book cover courtesy of SyndeticsPerfectly good white boy, Carrie Mesrobian

    Sean Norwhalt can read between the lines.
    “You never know where we’ll end up. There’s so much possibility in life, you know?” Hallie said.
    He knows she just dumped him. He was a perfectly good summer boyfriend, but now she’s off to college, and he’s still got another year to go. Her pep talk about futures and “possibilities” isn’t exactly comforting. Sean’s pretty sure he’s seen his future and its “possibilities” and they all look disposable. Like the crappy rental his family moved into when his dad left.Like all the unwanted filthy old clothes he stuffs into the rag baler at his thrift store job. Like everything good he’s ever known. The only hopeful possibilities in Sean’s life are the Marine Corps, where no one expected he’d go, and Neecie Albertson, whom he never expected to care about.(Goodreads)

    First lines: I stood in the back of the barn, in front of a pile of boxes marked “Tools,” watching the party go on. The senior girls’ spring party was usually down by the old railroad trestle bridge off Highway 10, but this time it was out on someone’s farm, so they’d decided to make it a goddamn hoedown or something.

    Book cover courtesy of SyndeticsA thousand pieces of you, Claudia Gray

    Marguerite Caine’s physicist parents are known for their radical scientific achievements. Their most astonishing invention: the Firebird, which allows users to jump into parallel universes, some vastly altered from our own. But when Marguerite’s father is murdered, the killer—her parent’s handsome and enigmatic assistant Paul—escapes into another dimension before the law can touch him. Marguerite can’t let the man who destroyed her family go free, and she races after Paul through different universes, where their lives entangle in increasingly familiar ways. With each encounter she begins to question Paul’s guilt—and her own heart. Soon she discovers the truth behind her father’s death is more sinister than she ever could have imagined.(Goodreads)

    First lines: My hand shakes as I brace myself against the brick wall. Rain falls cold and sharp against my skin, from a sky I’ve never seen before. It’s hard to catch my breath, to get any sense of where I am. All I know is that the Firebird worked. It hangs around my neck, glowing with the heat of the journey.

    Book cover courtesy of SyndeticsDirty Wings, Sarah McCarry

    Maia is a teenage piano prodigy and dutiful daughter, imprisoned in the oppressive silence of her adoptive parents’ house like a princess in an ivory tower. Cass is a street rat, witch, and runaway, scraping by with her wits and her knack for a five-fingered discount. When a chance encounter brings the two girls together, an unlikely friendship blossoms that will soon change the course of both their lives. Cass springs Maia from the jail of the only world she’s ever known, and Maia’s only too happy to make a break for it. But Cass didn’t reckon on Jason, the hypnotic blue-eyed rocker who’d capture Maia’s heart as soon as Cass set her free–and Cass isn’t the only one who’s noticed Maia’s extraordinary gifts. Is Cass strong enough to battle the ancient evil she’s unwittingly awakened–or has she walked into a trap that will destroy everything she cares about? In this time, like in any time, love is a dangerous game. (Goodreads)

    First lines: Before any of this, she thinks, there was the kind of promise a girl just couldn’t keep. Before the bad decisions, before the night sky right now so big, so big it’s big enough to swallow the both of them, before her hands shaking stop shaking stop shaking stop shaking. She is standing at the precipice of a cliff, the edges of her vision sparking out into static, the heaving sea below her moving against the rocking shore with a roar.

    Book cover courtesy of SyndeticsAtlantia, Ally Condie

    For as long as she can remember, Rio has dreamt of the sand and sky Above—of life beyond her underwater city of Atlantia. But in a single moment, all her plans for the future are thwarted when her twin sister, Bay, makes an unexpected decision, stranding Rio Below. Alone, ripped away from the last person who knew Rio’s true self—and the powerful siren voice she has long hidden—she has nothing left to lose. Guided by a dangerous and unlikely mentor, Rio formulates a plan that leads to increasingly treacherous questions about her mother’s death, her own destiny, and the complex system constructed to govern the divide between land and sea. Her life and her city depend on Rio to listen to the voices of the past and to speak long-hidden truths.(Goodreads)

    First lines: My twin sister, Bay, and I pass underneath the brown-and-turquoise banners hanging from the ceiling of the temple. Dignitaries perch on their chairs in the gallery, watching and people crowd the pews in the nave. Statues of the gods adorn the walls and ceiling, and it seems as if they watch us, too.

    Book cover courtesy of SyndeticsLies we tell ourselves, Robin Talley

    In 1959 Virginia, the lives of two girls on opposite sides of the battle for civil rights will be changed forever. Sarah Dunbar is one of the first black students to attend the previously all-white Jefferson High School. An honours student at her old school, she is put into remedial classes, spit on and tormented daily. Linda Hairston is the daughter of one of the town’s most vocal opponents of school integration. She has been taught all her life that the races should be kept “separate but equal.”
    Forced to work together on a school project, Sarah and Linda must confront harsh truths about race, power and how they really feel about one another.(Goodreads)

    First lines: The white people are waiting for us. Chuck sees them first. He’s gone out ahead of our group to peer around the corner by the hardware store. From there you can see all of Jefferson High. The gleaming redbrick walls run forty feet high. The building is a block wide, and the window panes are spotless. A heavy concrete arch hangs over the two storey wood-and-glass doors at the front entrance.

    Book cover courtesy of SyndeticsOnly ever yours, Louise O’Neill

    In a world in which baby girls are no longer born naturally, women are bred in schools, trained in the arts of pleasing men until they are ready for the outside world. At graduation, the most highly rated girls become “companions”, permitted to live with their husbands and breed sons until they are no longer useful. For the girls left behind, the future – as a concubine or a teacher – is grim. Best friends freida and isabel are sure they’ll be chosen as companions – they are among the most highly rated girls in their year. But as the intensity of final year takes hold, isabel does the unthinkable and starts to put on weight.And then, into this sealed female environment, the boys arrive, eager to choose a bride. freida must fight for her future – even if it means betraying the only friend, the only love, she has ever known.(Goodreads)

    First lines: The chastities keep asking me why I can’t sleep. I am at the maximum permitted dosage of SleepSound, they say, eyes narrowed in suspicious concern. Are you taking it correctly, frieda? Are you taking it all yourself, freida? Yes.Yes. Now, can I have some more? Please?

    Book cover courtesy of SyndeticsThe walled city, Ryan Graudin

    730. That’s how many days I’ve been trapped.
    18. That’s how many days I have left to find a way out.
    DAI, trying to escape a haunting past, traffics drugs for the most ruthless kingpin in the Walled City. But in order to find the key to his freedom, he needs help from someone with the power to be invisible….
    JIN hides under the radar, afraid the wild street gangs will discover her biggest secret: Jin passes as a boy to stay safe. Still, every chance she gets, she searches for her lost sister….
    MEI YEE has been trapped in a brothel for the past two years, dreaming of getting out while watching the girls who try fail one by one. She’s about to give up, when one day she sees an unexpected face at her window…..(Goodreads)

    First lines: There are three rules of survival in the Walled City: Run fast. Trust no one. Always carry your knife. Right now, my life depends completely on the first. Run, run, run.

    Book cover courtesy of SyndeticsDon’t you forget about me, Kate Karyus Quin

    Welcome to Gardnerville. A place where no one gets sick. And no one ever dies.Except…
    There’s a price to pay for paradise. Every fourth year, the strange power that fuels the town exacts its payment by infecting teens with deadly urges. In a normal year in Gardnerville, teens might stop talking to their best friends. In a fourth year, they’d kill them. Four years ago, Skylar’s sister, Piper, was locked away after leading sixteen of her classmates to a watery grave. Since then, Skylar has lived in a numb haze, struggling to forget her past and dull the pain of losing her sister. But the secrets and memories Piper left behind keep taunting Skylar—whispering that the only way to get her sister back is to stop Gardnerville’s murderous cycle once and for all.(Goodreads)

    First lines: It was a bizarre May Day Parade at midnight instead of midday. There were no floats, no firefighters dressed in full gear tossing out bubble gum while their single siren blared, no horns tooting in time to the beat of the drums. The golden girls did not prance and smile with their silver batons spinning figure eights. Little kids with faces red and sticky from Popsicles and candy apples didn’t shove and shout and cry when the balloon they’d forgotten they were holding escaped into the sky.

    Book cover courtesy of SyndeticsTerror kid, Benjamin Zephaniah

    Rico knows trouble. He knows the look of it and the sound of it. He also knows to stay away from it as best as he can. Because if there’s one thing his Romany background has taught him, it’s that he will always be a suspect. Despite his best efforts to stay on the right side of the law, Rico is angry and frustrated at the injustices he sees happening at home and around the world. He wants to do something – but what? When he is approached by Speech, a mysterious man who shares Rico’s hacktivist interests, Rico is given the perfect opportunity to speak out about injustice. After all, what harm can a peaceful cyber protest do…(Goodreads)

    First lines: Rico stood and stared and the shopping trolley flew through the air and smashed through the sports shop window. The boots and shoulders of the rioters had already weakened the toughened glass, and the force of the trolley caused the whole pane to shatter and collapse.

    Book cover courtesy of SyndeticsBlackbird, Anna Carey

    A girl wakes up on the train tracks, a subway car barreling down on her. With only minutes to react, she hunches down and the train speeds over her. She doesn’t remember her name, where she is, or how she got there. She has a tattoo on the inside of her right wrist of a blackbird inside a box, letters and numbers printed just below: FNV02198. There is only one thing she knows for sure: people are trying to kill her. On the run for her life, she tries to untangle who she is and what happened to the girl she used to be. Nothing and no one are what they appear to be. But the truth is more disturbing than she ever imagined.(Goodreads)

    First lines: The train holds the heat of the sun, even an hour after it has sunk below the pavement, pushing its way below the sprawling city. At the Vermont/Sunset station, a Chinese woman with a severe black bob leans over the platform’s edge, trying to gauge how far away the train is. A group of high school kids stands under a poster for some TV show, sharing ipod buds and discussing a boy called Kool-Aid.

    Book cover courtesy of SyndeticsWhere silence gathers, Kesley Sutton

    For as long as she can remember, Alexandra Tate has been able to see personified Emotions, and she’s found a best friend in Revenge. He’s her constant companion as she waits outside Nate Foster’s house, clutching a gun. Every night since Nate’s release from prison, Alex has tried to work up the courage to exact her own justice on him for the drunk driving accident that killed her family. But there’s one problem: Forgiveness. When he appears, Alex is faced with a choice—moving on or getting even. It’s impossible to decide with Forgiveness whispering in one ear . . . and Revenge whispering in the other.(Goodreads)

    First lines: Revenge finds me on the bridge. He sits down just as I finish my uncle’s bottle of rum. His legs dangle off the edge. I don’t look at him, and for a few moments neither of us says a word. Plumes of air leave my mouth with every breath. It’s still too cold for crickets, so the night is utterly silent. If I listen hard enough, I can almost hear the stars whispering to each other. Cruel, biting whispers.

    Book cover courtesy of SyndeticsApple and Rain, Sarah Crossnan

    When Apple’s mother returns after eleven years away, Apple feels whole again. But just like the stormy Christmas Eve when she left, her mother’s homecoming is bittersweet. It’s only when Apple meets someone more lost than she is that she begins to see things as they really are.(Goodreads)

    First lines: I don’t know if what I remember is what happened or just how I imagined it happened now I’m old enough to tell stories. I’ve read about this thing called childhood amnesia. It means we can’t remember anything from when we were really small because before three years old we haven’t practiced the skill of remembering enough to do it very well. That’s the theory, but I’m not convinced.

    Graphic novels

    Book cover courtesy of SyndeticsIn real life, Cory Doctorow and Jen Wang

    Anda loves Coarsegold Online, the massively-multiplayer role-playing game where she spends most of her free time. It’s a place where she can be a leader, a fighter, a hero. It’s a place where she can meet people from all over the world, and make friends.
    But things become a lot more complicated when Anda befriends a gold farmer–a poor Chinese kid whose avatar in the game illegally collects valuable objects and then sells them to players from developed countries with money to burn. This behavior is strictly against the rules in Coarsegold, but Anda soon comes to realize that questions of right and wrong are a lot less straightforward when a real person’s real livelihood is at stake. (Goodreads)

    Non fiction

    Book cover courtesy of SyndeticsThe fashion book, Alexandra Black

    From corsets and camis to tailoring and textiles, The Fashion Book is a sassy style guide for teenage girls who want to discover the stories behind their favorite looks, find their own style, and learn what makes the fashion world tick.Packed with gorgeous images, this illustrated book for young adults takes a unique look at fashion. It reveals how modern-day looks, from catwalk to high-street fashions, draw on the styles of the past from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance and from the rebel attire of the 50’s to the sport-inspired looks of the 80’s.
    Through witty graphics and bright lively text, teens can go behind the scenes of the exclusive fashion world. Style icons, designers, and top models all give practical tips to create stunning outfits, explain key fashion terms, discuss careers in fashion, and reveal secrets of the industry. Trivia, a glossary, inspirational quotes, and more make The Fashion Book a must-have accessory for teens.(Goodreads)


  • Isn't that cool?, Rachel

    Pay for your fines with cans!

    08.12.14 | Permalink | Comments Off on Pay for your fines with cans!

    cansFrom the 8th to 21st of December you can donate a 410g can of food at the library to have $3.00 taken off your overdue fines.

    All will be donated to local food banks, so make sure the food is suitable for human consumption (so no cat food!) and the cans are not damaged or rusty.

    You can donate as many cans as you like but once your applicable overdue fines have been cleared, no credit or cash will be due.

    The amnesty only applies to fines, not to fees or charges, lost or damaged books or accounts already lodged with debt collection agencies

    So let your fines help someone else this Christmas! You can help us help others (▰˘◡˘▰)


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