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August 2013

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  • Fashion Friday, Style Catalogue

    Diana Vreeland DVD

    30.08.13 | Permalink | Comments Off on Diana Vreeland DVD

    Syndetics book coverDiana Vreeland [videorecording] : the eye has to travel / Samuel Goldwyn Films, Epix Pictures and Gloss Studio present a Mago Media production ; directed and produced by Lisa Immordino Vreeland.
    “Diana Vreeland wasn’t just a tastemaker; she created the whole idea of tastemaking. She was the oracle of style, a woman who defined the way we looked at couture. Across a career that spanned half a century, she edited Harper’s Bazaar and Vogue, discovered Lauren Bacall (and innumerable others) and was style consultant to Jackie Onassis. This is her philosophy: on life, on fashion and on making it in an industry which so many desire to be part of and so few know how to crack”–Container.

    We have a sweet new DVD at the library which is a must-see. I was gutted to have missed this  when it hit art-house cinemas a wee while ago, so I’m sooo relieved we got this in!! Telling the story of legendary Vogue editor Diana Vreeland, this DVD has been super popular since it hit our shelves. I am still patiently waiting on my reserve to come in, so I recommend you place yours ASAP!!

    kevin_sharkey_home_design_martha_stewart_book_diana_vreeland_1
    Photo: Fashion’s Most Wanted


  • Books, Grimm, New

    New Next Month(ish)

    28.08.13 | Permalink | Comments Off on New Next Month(ish)

    These are all due to arrive some time in September (or early October if the boat is super-slow). Some suspenseful stories (with a bit of fantasy), and one about discovering your niche.

    Shadows, Robin McKinley – “Maggie knows something’s off about Val, her mom’s new husband. Val is from Oldworld, where they still use magic, and he won’t have any tech in his office-shed behind the house. But – more importantly – what are the huge, horrible, jagged, jumpy shadows following him around? Magic is illegal in Newworld, which is all about science. The magic-carrying gene was disabled two generations ago, back when Maggie’s great-grandmother was a notable magician. But that was a long time ago. Then Maggie meets Casimir, the most beautiful boy she has ever seen. He’s from Oldworld too – and he’s heard of Maggie’s stepfather, and has a guess about Val’s shadows. Maggie doesn’t want to know… until earth-shattering events force her to depend on Val and his shadows. And perhaps on her own heritage.” (goodreads.com)

    All the Truth That’s in Me, Julie Berry – “Four years ago, Judith and her best friend disappeared from their small town of Roswell Station. Two years ago, only Judith returned, permanently mutilated, reviled and ignored by those who were once her friends and family. Unable to speak, Judith lives like a ghost in her own home, silently pouring out her thoughts to the boy who’s owned her heart as long as she can remember – even if he doesn’t know it – her childhood friend, Lucas. But when Roswell Station is attacked, long-buried secrets come to light, and Judith is forced to choose: continue to live in silence, or recover her voice, even if it means changing her world, and the lives around her, forever.” (goodreads.com)

    This Song Will Save Your Life, Leila Sales – “Making friends has never been Elise Dembowski’s strong suit. All throughout her life, she’s been the butt of every joke and the outsider in every conversation. When a final attempt at popularity fails, Elise nearly gives up. Then she stumbles upon a warehouse party where she meets Vicky, a girl in a band who accepts her; Char, a cute, yet mysterious disc jockey; Pippa, a carefree spirit from England; and most importantly, a love for DJing.” (goodreads.com)

    The Messengers, Edward Hogan – “When fifteen-year-old Frances is sent down to the coast to Helmstown, to live with her aunt, uncle and cousin, she meets and befriends Peter Kennedy, a somewhat tramp-like character who lives in a beach hut along the seafront. As soon as they meet, Peter recognizes that Frances is a messenger, just like him. As messengers, they experience black-outs, and when they come round, they have the ability to draw, in minute detail, the scene of an accident. Although Frances can’t change the past, she realises that she can change the future, at least for a chosen few.” (goodreads.com)


  • Rachel and Rebecca

    Books that haven’t gone out in a while

    27.08.13 | Permalink | Comments Off on Books that haven’t gone out in a while

    One of the huge jobs we’re currently in the process of doing is ‘weeding’ the YA collection at Central. This means that we get to see what’s going out lots and what isn’t going out at all. If we think it’s a good book that should be going out more then we keep it. And so, this list of recommendations comes from that collection of books; the gems that haven’t gone out in a while, part one.

    book cover courtesy of SyndeticsSinging It, Anne Cottringer

    Flower Power has always moved around. Why should this new town, new school, new flat be any different from all the others? But then she makes some friends who share her passion for old jazz classics. Perhaps her hippie parents’ near-neglect won’t matter, with these new people around her. But as the school year progresses, with boyfriends in the mix, Flower’s relationships evolve and change. Flower finds that the only way that she can deal with it all is to sing her songs, and her old favorites – but will she ever find the courage to sing to a roomful of people?

    book cover courtesy of SyndeticsFootfree and Fancyloose, Elizabeth Craft & Sarah Fain

    Harper Waddle, Sophie Bushell, and Kate Foster committed the ultimate suburban sin: bailing on college to pursue their dreams. Their best friend, Becca Winsberg, took a more traditional path, but she’s got dreams of her own. Now the year is halfway through and the girl’s dreams seem within reach.

    book cover courtesy of SyndeticsThe Very Ordered Existence of Merilee Marvelous, Suzanne Crowley

    In the small town of Jumbo, Texas, thirteen-year old Merrille, who has Asperger’s Syndrome, tries to live a “very ordered existence”. But disruption begins when a boy and his father arrive in town, and the youngster makes himself a part of the family.

    book cover courtesy of SyndeticsMiss McAllister’s Ghost, Elizabeth Fensham

    Cassie and her two brothers Mick (at 13, one year younger than Cassie) and Wilf (8-years-old) discover a very old lady living a time-forgotten life in a nearby suburb. Her house is cut off from the world, she is largely self-sufficient but has a believable means by which she supplements her food requirements. Miss McAllister moves from irascible and overbearing stranger to become the centre of the children’s lives. Their own parents, caught up in their own lives, are on the periphery of their childrens. Miss McAllister provides stability, a much-needed sense of responsibility, a standard of ethical behaviour and ultimately, love.

    book cover courtesy of SyndeticsEscaping into the Night, D. Dina Friedman

    Halina Rudowski is on the run. When the Polish ghetto where she lives is evacuated, she narrowly escapes, but her mother is not as lucky. Along with her friend Batya, Halina makes her way to a secret encampment in the woods where Jews survive by living underground. As the group struggles for food, handles infighting, and attempts to protect themselves from the advancing Germans, Halina must face the reality of life without her mother.

    book cover courtesy of SyndeticsCrossing Stones, Helen Frost

    Eighteen-year-old Muriel Jorgensen lives on one side of Crabapple Creek. Her family’s closest friends, the Normans, live on the other. For as long as Muriel can remember, the families’ lives have been intertwined, connected by the crossing stones that span the water. But now that Frank Norman—who Muriel is just beginning to think might be more than a friend—has enlisted to fight in World War I and her brother, Ollie, has lied about his age to join him, the future is uncertain. As Muriel tends to things at home with the help of Frank’s sister, Emma, she becomes more and more fascinated by the women’s suffrage movement, but she is surrounded by people who advise her to keep her opinions to herself. How can she find a way to care for those she loves while still remaining true to who she is?

    book cover courtesy of SyndeticsSoul Enchilada, David MacInnis Gill

    After a demon appears to repossess her car, eighteen-year-old Bug Smoot discovers that both the car and her soul were given as collateral in a deal made with the Devil by her irascible Grandfather. Given two-days grace, she tries to find a way to outsmart the Devil and his minions.

    This is an enormous job! As you can see, I’m only up to the G’s which is why this is only part one. Keep an eye out for more gems that haven’t gone out in a while!


  • Books, New, Rebecca

    New Books

    26.08.13 | Permalink | Comments Off on New Books

    all about secrets:

    book cover courtesy of SyndeticsThe Last Herrick Secret, Adele Broadbent (222 pages) – Becs and her family are returning to the city, taking Isaiah Herrick with them. Becs is keen to slot right back into city life where she left off, but it’s harder than she expected. Isaiah struggles with the change and is worried about a stranger he saw on the verandah as they left the bush. Meanwhile, things aren’t right at Herrick House, and soon Becs and Isaiah have to return in order to help with the last Herrick secret.

    First lines: “‘Goodbye, Son.’ Mother smiled, a tear sliding down her cheek. A knot formed in my throat, cutting off my answer. I hugged her instead before standing in front of Papa.”

    book cover courtesy of SyndeticsIndigo Awakening, Jordan Dane (294 pages) – Voices told Lucas Darby to run. Voices no one else can hear. He’s warned his sister not to look for him, but Rayne refuses to let her troubled brother vanish on the streets of LA. In her desperate search, she meets Gabriel Stewart, a runaway with mysterious powers and far too many secrets. Rayne can’t explain her crazy need to trust the strange yet compelling boy—to touch him—to protect him even though he scares her. A fanatical church secretly hunts psychic kids—gifted “Indigo” teens feared to be the next evolution of mankind—for reasons only “the Believers” know. Now Rayne’s only hope is Gabe, who is haunted by an awakening power—a force darker than either of them imagine—that could doom them all.

    First lines: “Lucas Darby stumbled through heaving waves of neon signs and drifting shadows, straining to make sense of the muffled whispers he heard. Drugs had forced him endure a never-ending silence, where even the music in his head had died. But now the voices had emerged and quenched a killer thirst in his soul.”

    book cover courtesy of SyndeticsSomething Like Hope, Shawn Goodman (193 pages) – 17-year-old Shavonne has been in juvenile detention since the seventh grade. Mr Delpopolo is the first counselor to treat her as an equal, and he helps her get to the bottom of her self-destructive behavior, her guilt about past actions, and her fears about leaving the Center when she turns 18. Shavonne’s mentally unstable roommate Cinda makes a rash move, and Shavonne’s quick thinking saves her life—and gives her the opportunity to get out of the Center if she behaves well. But Shavonne’s faith is tested when her new roommate, Mary, is targeted by a guard as a means to get revenge on Shavonne. As freedom begins to look more and more likely, Shavonne begins to believe that maybe she, like the goslings recently hatched on the Center’s property, could have a future somewhere else—and she begins to feel something like hope.

    First lines: “Lying on the cold hard floor of a locked room, I wish. Is it bad to wish? It feels bad, but only because my wishes drift away. They escape from me and go wherever wishes go. Where do wishes go? Better places, I hope.”

    book cover courtesy of SyndeticsThe Whole of My World, Nicole Hayes (370 pages) – Desperate to escape her grieving father and harbouring her own terrible secret, Shelley disappears into the intoxicating world of AFL. Joining a motley crew of footy tragics and, best of all, making friends with one of the star players, Shelley finds somewhere to belong. Finally she’s winning. So why don’t her friends get it? Josh, who she’s known all her life, but who she can barely look at anymore because of the memories of that fateful day. Tara, whose cold silences Shelley can’t understand. Everyone thinks there’s something more going on between Shelley and Mick. But there isn’t is there? When the whole of your world is football, sometimes life gets lost between goals.

    First lines: “The mirror used to be mum’s. Her mum’s before that. It’s oval shaped with a gold frame and patches of tarnish around the edge, like smudges of dirt that won’t go away.”

    book cover courtesy of SyndeticsGloss, Marilyn Kaye (394 pages) – New York, 1963. Fashion, music and attitudes are changing, and there’s nowhere in the world more exciting. Sherry, Donna, Allison and Pamela have each landed a dream internship at Gloss; America’s number-one fashion magazine. Each girl is trying to make her mark on New York and each finds herself thrown head-first into the buzzing world of celebrity, high-end fashion and gossip. But everything isn’t as glamorous as it seems – secrets from the past threaten to shatter their dreams. They’re finding out that romance in New York is as unpredictable and thrilling as the city itself.

    First lines: “Sherry Ann Forrester knew the rules. Among the many social guidelines that had been drummed into her since childhood was this fixed decree: a lady maintained her air of composure, whatever the circumstances.”

    book cover courtesy of SyndeticsDare You To, Katie McGarry (456 pages) – If anyone knew the truth about Beth Risk’s home life, they’d send her mother to jail and seventeen-year-old Beth who knows where. So she protects her mom at all costs. Until the day her uncle swoops in and forces Beth to choose between her mom’s freedom and her own happiness. That’s how Beth finds herself living with an aunt who doesn’t want her and going to a school that doesn’t understand her. At all. Except for the one guy who shouldn’t get her, but does. Ryan Stone is the town golden boy, a popular baseball star jock-with secrets he can’t tell anyone. Not even the friends he shares everything with, including the constant dares to do crazy things. The craziest? Asking out the Skater girl who couldn’t be less interested in him.

    First lines: “I’m not interested in second place. Never have been. Never will be. It’s not the style of anyone who wants to play in the majors. And because of my personal philosophy, this moment sucks.”

    book cover courtesy of SyndeticsBroken, Elizabeth Pulford (243 pages) – Critically injured in a motorbike accident, Zara Wilson lies in a coma. She is caught between many worlds: the world of her hospital room and anxious family, and that of her memories and a dream-like fantasy where she searches for her brother Jem. Jem proves elusive but Zara s adventures in her subconscious unlock dark secrets of a troubled childhood. Zara must face up to her past in order to accept her future.

    First lines: “My head is full of bubbles. Strange floating words, bits of conversations, bits of people. Some I know. Some I don’t. Hundreds of coloured dots. I can’t see straight. Can’t think straight. I seem to be nowhere. I seem to be everywhere. If only the wretched thumping in my head would stop.”


  • Fashion Friday, Style Catalogue

    Thrifting

    23.08.13 | Permalink | Comments Off on Thrifting

    I know we’ve discussed the merits of secondhand or thrift shopping before, but it really is just so awesome! I’m constantly amazed at the sweet bargains you can get. It’s such a great way to buy beautiful things that you possibly otherwise couldn’t afford. Being good for the environment, your wallet and your wardrobe, what’s not to like?

    We have some new books on vintage fashion and secondhand goodness coming in, so I thought I’d celebrate our lovely new reads by showing off some of my favourite secondhand bargain buys.

    photo 1photo 4

    These two items, I nabbed from everyone’s favourite secondhand shopping website – for a total spend of $20! Shoes and a shirt! Including shipping! Whoop!!

    photo 3

    I saw this bag in a local secondhand store and fell in love. I thought it was kinda expensive by secondhand standards (30 buck, ya’ll!), but it is in perfect condition and is really beautiful and also a bit different – I get loads of comments on it whenever I use it.

    photo 2

    This is definitely an example of something I couldn’t have afforded otherwise! It is in amazingly good condition, especially considering it is from the 70s (and beige!), and I love the chic simplicity of it and the slightly old-school vibe. Swoon.

    And, as promised, we do have some sweet new books on vintage and secondhand fashions. These are new orders (so they haven’t hit our shelves just yet) but reserve now to avoid disappointment!! I have my eye (and reservation!) on number two.

    Syndetics book coverSecondhand & vintage Paris

     

     

     

     

     

    Syndetics book coverVintage fashion & culture: from Poiret to McQueen

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


  • Books, Grimm, New

    Interesting fiction we’re getting soon

    21.08.13 | Permalink | Comments Off on Interesting fiction we’re getting soon

    A not-so-futuristic dystopian story, some gothic horror, and another new book from the prolific David Levithan.

    Gated, Amy Christine Parker. “In Mandrodage Meadows, life seems perfect. The members of this isolated suburban community have thrived under Pioneer, the charismatic leader who saved them from their sad, damaged lives. Lyla Hamilton and her parents are original members of the flock. They moved here following the 9/11 terrorist attacks, looking to escape the evil in the world. Now seventeen, Lyla knows certain facts are not to be questioned: Pioneer is her leader. Will is her Intended. The end of the world is near. Like Noah before him, Pioneer has been told of the imminent destruction of humanity. He says his chosen must arm themselves to fight off the unchosen people, who will surely seek refuge in the compound’s underground fortress – the Silo. Lyla loves her family and friends, but given the choice, she prefers painting to target practice. And lately she’d rather think about a certain boy outside the compound than plan for married life in the Silo with Will. But with the end of days drawing near, she will have to pick up a gun, take a side, and let everyone know where she stands.” (goodreads.com)

    Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea, April Genevieve Tucholke. The first in a new series. “Nothing much exciting rolls through Violet White’s sleepy, seaside town… until River West comes along. River rents the guesthouse behind Violet’s crumbling estate, and as eerie, grim things start to happen, Violet begins to wonder about the boy living in her backyard. Is River just a crooked-smiling liar with pretty eyes and a mysterious past? Or could he be something more? Violet’s grandmother always warned her about the Devil, but she never said he could be a dark-haired boy who takes naps in the sun, who likes coffee, who kisses you in a cemetery… who makes you want to kiss back. Violet’s already so knee-deep in love, she can’t see straight. And that’s just how River likes it.” (goodreads.com)

    Two Boys Kissing, David Levithan. Based on actual events, Two Boys Kissing tells the story of two seventeen year olds who have a crack at the Guinness World Record for kissing. Their participation in the 32 hour marathon becomes “a focal point in the lives of other teen boys dealing with languishing long-term relationships, coming out, navigating gender identity, and falling deeper into the digital rabbit hole of gay hookup sites – all while the kissing former couple tries to figure out their own feelings for each other” (goodreads.com). From the author/coauthor of Boy Meets Boy, Will Grayson, Will Grayson, Nick & Norah’s Infinite Playlist, and so much more.


  • Rachel and Rebecca, Tremendous Trilogies

    Tremendous Trilogies, Volume Seven.

    20.08.13 | Permalink | Comments Off on Tremendous Trilogies, Volume Seven.

    We’ve always loved Maurice Gee since being introduced to him at school with The fire-raiser and Under the mountain. Imagine our excitement then at now being able to rave about his tremendous YA Salt Trilogy! This tremendous trilogy takes place in a part dystopian, part fantasy world where one group of citizens, Company, exploit everyone else. Never fear, there’s a resistance movement against these dasterdly rulers and their cruel inforcers, the Whips. What struck us the most about this novel was that the narration felt very much like an oral tradition society telling the story of their origins. The flow of the sentences, the words chosen, the cadence for example all suggest this story is best read aloud.

    book cover courtesy of SyndeticsSalt, Maurice Gee

    The first book in the trilogy opens with the father of the hero, Hari, being forcably taken by the Whips to work in Deep Salt, the mysterious mines from which no one returns. Hari has a secret gift: he can communicate with animals. With this and his own smarts he sets out to rescue his father from With him is the beautiful Pearl, born into Company, she runs from a life of subservience as a married woman and has learned forbidden things from her mysteriously gifted maid Tealeaf.

    book cover courtesy of SyndeticsGool, Maurice Gee

    Book two introduces a different kind of horror to Hari’s world. The Gool cannot be seen, not properly, but its evil presence can be sensed. It lurks in the jungle in rock clefts, an enemy from outside nature. And now, a fragment of Gool holds Hari by the throat, draining the life from him. Hari’s friends set out on a perilous mission to find the Dog King Tarl, Hari’s father who they hope will be able to find the source of the Gool and destroy it before it’s too late.

    book cover courtesy of SyndeticsThe limping man, Maurice Gee

    The final book involves Hari and Pearl’s grandson Ben. He’s been raised by them, and doesn’t quite fit into their world (in the wilderness) or his father’s world (in the city). Back in the burrows Hana has just watched her mother die, and she seeks a way to take revenge on the Limping Man, who has caused her death. Hanna and Ben meet in the forest where they learn of the advancing armies that will wipe out all those who have sought refuge in the wilderness. And so begins their quest to destroy the Limping Man whose secret they need to discover because none of them–alone or together–is strong enough to fight the evil the Limping Man embodies without knowing his secret.

    Oh, Maurice Gee, you do battles of good and evil so very well. We loved The Halfmen of O and we love this Tremendous Trilogy just as much!


  • Books, New, Rebecca

    New Books

    19.08.13 | Permalink | Comments Off on New Books

    book cover courtesy of SyndeticsThe Sin-Eater’s Confession, Lisa J. Bick (287 pages) – People in Merit, Wisconsin, always said Jimmy was … you know. But people said all sorts of stupid stuff. Nobody really knew anything. Nobody really knew Jimmy. I guess you could say I knew Jimmy as well as anyone (which was not very well). I knew what scared him. And I knew he had dreams—even if I didn’t understand them. Even if he nearly ruined my life to pursue them. Jimmy’s dead now, and I definitely know that better than anyone. I know about blood and bone and how bodies decompose. I know about shadows and stones and hatchets. I know what a last cry for help sounds like. I know what blood looks like on my own hands. What I don’t know is if I can trust my own eyes. I don’t know who threw the stone. Who swung the hatchet? Who are the shadows? What do the living owe the dead?

    First lines: “Call me Ben. Okay, it’s not Ishmael or anything, but the idea’s the same. Wicked and repentant, that’s me.”

    book cover courtesy of SyndeticsHalf Lives, Sara Grant (334 pages) – Present day: Icie is a typical high school teenager – until disaster strikes and her parents send her to find shelter inside a mountain near Las Vegas. The future: Beckett lives on The Mountain – a sacred place devoted to the Great I AM. He must soon become the leader of his people. But Beckett is forced to break one of the sacred laws, and when the Great I AM does not strike him down, Beckett finds himself starting to question his beliefs. As Beckett investigates The Mountain’s history, Icie’s story is revealed – along with the terrifying truth of what lies at the heart of The Mountain.

    First lines: “If you’d asked me that day whether I could lie, cheat, steal and kill, I would have said ab-so-lutely not.”

    book cover courtesy of SyndeticsNine Days, Fred Hiatt (239 pages) – Set against the bustling backdrop of Hong Kong, Vietnam, and the border of China, this heart-pounding adventure takes place as two teens, an American teenage boy and his friend, a Chinese girl from his Washington, DC-area high school, must find her father who has been kidnapped—and they only have nine days.

    First lines: “Already the summer heat is defeating the wheezing air-conditioning unit in a third-floor bedroom window of an apartment in Bethesda, Maryland. A fifteen-year-old girl in a T-shirt and shorts kicks off her sheet, rises and slips into the chair in front of her computer.”

    book cover courtesy of SyndeticsFar Far Away, Tom McNeal (369 pages) – Jeremy Johnson once admitted he’s able to hear voices, and the townspeople of Never Better have treated him like an outsider since. After his mother left, his father became a recluse, and it’s been up to Jeremy to support the family. But it hasn’t been up to Jeremy alone. The truth is, Jeremy can hear voices. Or, specifically, one voice: the voice of the ghost of Jacob Grimm, one half of the infamous writing duo, The Brothers Grimm. Jacob watches over Jeremy, protecting him from an unknown dark evil whispered about in the space between this world and the next. But when the provocative local girl Ginger Boultinghouse takes an interest in Jeremy (and his unique abilities), a grim chain of events is put into motion. And as anyone familiar with the Grimm Brothers know, not all fairy tales have happy endings.

    First lines: “What follows is the strange and fateful tale of a boy, a girl, and a ghost. The boy possessed uncommon qualities, the girl was winsome and daring, and the ancient ghost … well, let it only be said that his intentions were good.”

    book cover courtesy of SyndeticsThe Rithmatist, Brandon Sanderson (370 pages) – More than anything, Joel wants to be a Rithmatist. Chosen by the Master in a mysterious inception ceremony, Rithmatists have the power to infuse life into two-dimensional figures known as Chalklings. Rithmatists are humanity’s only defense against the Wild Chalklings — merciless creatures that leave mangled corpses in their wake. As the son of a lowly chalkmaker at Armedius Academy, Joel can only watch as Rithmatist students study the magical art that he would do anything to practice. Then students start disappearing — kidnapped from their rooms at night, leaving trails of blood. Assigned to help the professor who is investigating the crimes, Joel and his friend Melody find themselves on the trail of an unexpected discovery — one that will change Rithmatics — and their world — forever.

    First lines: “Lilly’s lamp blew out as she bolted down the hallway. She threw the lamp aside, splashing oil across the painted wall and fine rug. The liquid glistened in the moonlight. The house was empty. Silent, save for her panicked breathing. She’d given up on screaming. Nobody seemed to hear.”

    book cover courtesy of SyndeticsThe Murmurings, Carly Anne West (370 pages) – Everyone thinks Sophie’s sister, Nell, went crazy. After all, she heard strange voices that drove her to commit suicide. But Sophie doesn’t believe that Nell would take her own life, and she’s convinced that Nell’s doctor knows more than he’s letting on. As Sophie starts to piece together Nell’s last days, every lead ends in a web of lies. And the deeper Sophie digs, the more danger she’s in—because now she’s hearing the same haunting whispers. Sophie’s starting to think she’s going crazy too. Or worse, that maybe she’s not.

    First lines: “I’m supposed to wonder why Gregor Samsa is a cockroach. Not how. Why. That’s the way Mrs. Dodd says we need to think if we’re going to analyze The Metamorphosis.”

    book cover courtesy of SyndeticsPortraits of Celina, Sue Whiting (349 pages) – Make him pay, Bayley. Make him pay. It’s as if the wooden chest is luring me, urging me to open it – daring me almost. Open me up. Look inside. Come on, just for a second; it won’t hurt. Celina O’Malley was sixteen years old when she disappeared. Now, almost forty years later, Bayley is sleeping in Celina’s room, wearing her clothes, hearing her voice. What does Celina want? And who will suffer because of it? A ghost story. A love story. A story of revenge.

    First lines: “The day I turned sixteen we buried my father. No one realised what day it was. Not even me. We were too stunned. How could someone you love die – just like that?”


  • Fashion Friday, Style Catalogue

    Oh, Audrey

    16.08.13 | Permalink | Comments Off on Oh, Audrey

    Audrey
    Picture from doctormacro

    I am a massive Audrey Hepburn fan and we have a lovely new book that I am quuuiiiite excited about:

    Syndetics book coverAudrey Hepburn in hats / June Marsh.
    “Audrey Hepburn’s legendary style and grace redefined perceived notions of Hollywood glamour and ushered in an age of sophistication and elegance. Her legacy on screen and in fashion is undisputed and her image has become as synonymous with her fame as her films. This book celebrates Audrey Hepburn wearing a selection of her most beautiful, stylish and outrageous hats – from legendary designs such as Givenchy, Mr. John, Dior, Cecil Beaton and Balenciaga. This exquisite volume features stunning photography and accompanying text from renowned fashion writer, June Marsh.” – amazon.com

    Gotta love a title that tells you exactly what to expect!! I also have my eye on this one:

    Syndetics book coverWhat would Audrey do? : timeless lessons for living with grace and style / Pamela Keogh.
    “Though on-camera she was often cast in the role of a carefree ingénue, Audrey Hepburn’s off-camera life was marked by challenges: growing up without a father and with the Nazi threat during her youth; a demanding film career while she was a young mother; unfaithful husbands and two divorces; and constant scrutiny from the media. Yet Audrey Hepburn always epitomized beauty and grace. In the tradition of What Would Jackie Do? bestselling author Pamela Keogh culls lessons in loveliness from a woman who survived every setback with panache.” – goodreads.com 

    So ya’ll know what I’ll be reading this weekend!

    For some sweet, up-beat and gorgeously old-school charm, I recommend you watch a couple of her movies. If you haven’t yet been drawn in by Audrey’s irresistable manner yet, you soon will be!

    Breakfast at Tiffany’s [videorecording] / Paramount Pictures ; a Jurow-Shepherd production ; directed by Blake Edwards ; produced by Martin Jurow and Richard Shepherd ; screenplay by George Axelrod.
    An eccentric New York City playgirl is determined to marry a Brazilian millionaire, but her next-door neighbour, a writer, changes her plans.

    Funny face [videorecording] / [presented] by Paramount Pictures.
    A Cinderella story about an inconspicuous salesgirl who is whisked off to Paris by a group of fashion magazine sophisticates and transformed into a dazzling model with whom the magazine’s photographer falls in love.

    Audrey


  • Books, Grimm, New

    Looking forward to:

    14.08.13 | Permalink | Comments Off on Looking forward to:

    Fighting Pax, Robin Jarvis – “Throughout the world, Dancing Jax reigns supreme. The Ismus and his court are celebrated and adored, and the Ismus is writing the much-awaited sequel to Dancing Jax. But when someone accidentally reads the manuscript, the true, evil purpose of Austerly Fellows is finally revealed. Can the resistance halt the publication of Fighting Pax? Or is humanity doomed and will the Dawn Prince arise at last?” (goodreads.com)

    Burn for Burn and Fire with Fire, Jenny Han – from the author of The Summer I Turned Pretty. Revenge, with a hint of paranormal. “Lillia has never had any problems dealing with boys who like her. Not until this summer, when one went too far. No way will she let the same thing happen to her little sister. Kat is tired of the rumours, the insults, the cruel jokes. It all goes back to one person – her ex-best friend – and she’s ready to make her pay. Four years ago, Mary left Jar Island because of a boy. But she’s not the same girl anymore. And she’s ready to prove it to him. Three very different girls who want the same thing: sweet, sweet revenge. And they won’t stop until they each had a taste.” (goodreads.com, on Burn for Burn)

    Descendant, Lesley Livingston – the sequel to Starling. “The last thing Mason Starling remembers is the train crossing a bridge. An explosion… a blinding light… then darkness. Now she is alone, stranded in Asgard – the realm of Norse legend – and the only way for her to get home is to find the Spear of Odin, a powerful relic left behind by vanished gods. The Fennrys Wolf knows all about Asgard. He was once trapped there. And he’ll do whatever it takes to find the girl who’s stolen his heart and bring her back – even if it means a treacherous descent into the Underworld. But time is running out, and Fenn knows something Mason doesn’t: if she takes up the Spear, she’ll set in motion a terrible prophecy. And she won’t just return to her world… she’ll destroy it.” (goodreads.com)

    Counting by 7s, Holly Goldberg Sloan – “Willow Chance is a twelve-year-old genius, obsessed with nature and diagnosing medical conditions, who finds it comforting to count by 7s. It has never been easy for her to connect with anyone other than her adoptive parents, but that hasn’t kept her from leading a quietly happy life… until now. Suddenly Willow’s world is tragically changed when her parents both die in a car crash, leaving her alone in a baffling world. The triumph of this book is that it is not a tragedy. This extraordinarily odd, but extraordinarily endearing, girl manages to push through her grief. Her journey to find a fascinatingly diverse and fully believable surrogate family is a joy and a revelation to read.” (goodreads.com)


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