A mixture of new and current non fiction.

Hey kids!

Check out what’s new… and current in the junior non fiction collection at your local library. This post features books that will enhance your knowledge of history, games, the universe and so much more!

Enjoy!

image courtesy of syndeticsSee inside the Second World War.

With vivid illustrations and flaps to lift, this book takes you into the action of the Second World War.

image courtesy of syndeticsEngineering.

Showcases engineering feats throughout history from the pyramids of Ancient Egypt to the building of the Golden Gate Bridge. The book also features famous engineers, including the Wright brothers to Gustave Eiffel. Steam engines, rocket technology, bridges, and buildings are all covered here in this exciting book.

image courtesy of syndeticsForgotten beasts : amazing creatures that once roamed the Earth.

Matt Sewell’s follow-up to the mega-hit Dinosaurs is a beautifully-illustrated large format look at the amazing beasts that time forgot – from the relatively well known, such as the sabre-toothed tiger and woolly mammoth, to the obscure monsters that walked the earth millions of years ago – many now forgotten. New findings are being made every year, and research is showing us exactly how these beasts looked and how they lived.

image courtesy of syndeticsHistory of the world in 100 pictures.

This history of the world covers 100 fascinating historical subjects, including Ancient Egypt, Alexander the Great, the start of Islam, the Aztecs, the French Revolution, the first computer, Albert Einstein and the Space Race. Each topic is brought to life by photographs, easy-to-read text and colourful, modern illustrations.

image courtesy of syndeticsThe world of Vikings.

Set sail in your longboat and explore the mysterious lands of runes, raids and sagas. The Vikings combines breathtakingly vivid images with fascinating facts to unlock the world of these legendary warriors, traders and explorers.

image courtesy of sydneticsI am here, where are you?

In I Am Here, Where Are You? Ollie tells the reader where he is. This book provides a springboard for discussion of the reader’s location and explores concepts of cultural diversity, extended family, time zones and conservation of the planet we all share. Finally, it invites the reader to practise writing their own address, finishing at The Universe.

image courtesy of syndeticsHow to play chess.

Follow the easy steps to grandmaster greatness with How To Play Chess. From the opening move to checkmate, How To Play Chess will help your child play chess like a champion. With plenty of master tips and cool 3D images, How To Play Chess is the perfect introduction to chess for beginners as well as kids.

image courtesy of syndeticsThe Great big book of life.

“Aren’t humans amazing? It’s incredible to think that all of us started out life as a tiny dot. Find out how we change as we grow from babies to children to teenagers to adults, and what happens when people get old.”–From page 4 of cover.

image courtesy of syndeticsRainforest.

Prepare to take a chronological journey, from the first roots grown by newly evolved plants and trees, through blazing fires and climatic changes, to an explosion of flora and fauna as the rainforest blossoms with life. Travel right up to the modern-day, as humans arrive in the lush habitat, changing the rainforest and its inhabitants forever.

image courtesy of syndeticsFantastically Great Women Who Worked Wonders.

Kate Pankhurst, descendent of Emmeline Pankhurst, is back with a brand new wildly brilliant and accessible book about incredible women in the world of work. Discover eye- opening facts about a collection of go-getting women who have pioneered careers in a kaleidoscope of different industries.

Kids’ Club Review by Aoi: Nathan Hale’s hazardous tales. Raid of no return : a World War II tale

Nathan Hale's hazardous tales. Raid of no return : a World War II taleNathan Hale’s hazardous tales. Raid of no return : a World War II tale, Nathan Hale

This book told me the facts of World War 2. Let me tell you some facts.
Nazi started War to take revenge on losing World War. They joined forces with Japan. Japan invented most of the world to 1939 – 1942. Japan invented China to Papua New Guinea. In 1941 Japan attacked Perl Harbor surprise attack on USA that dragged USA to War. At midway Japan lost against USA. In 1945 USA air of forces dropped 2 nuclear bombs on Japan. A week later Japan surrender and War was over. German had a secret weapon called V2-Roect powered by rocket engine. The V2-Roect was made Wernher von Braun was secretly moved to USA.
This book is very interested. This book tells you about world War 2.

5 stars

Reviewed by Aoi from Karori and Amesbury School , 8 years old

Kids’ Club Review by Abi: Once

Once, by Morris Gleitzman

 

This story is about Felix. He lives in a orphanage. The Nazis come over one day and start burning Jewish books. What will Felix do? find out by reading Once.

5 stars

Reviewed by Abi from Kilbirnie, 9 years old

Kids’ Club Review by Gabriel: The woeful Second World War

The woeful Second World WarThe woeful Second World War, by Terry Deary

We all know that the war was all about fighting but some of it was very horrible like the time when Adolf Hitler poisoned his dog then his wife then finally himself.some of their inventions like the molotov cocktail did not work well. This is a really good book history has never been so horrible.

5 stars

Reviewed by Gabriel from Tawa, 8 years old

6 New Non Fiction: Coding, dance and world wonders.

Hey Kids!

Check out the latest junior non fiction at Wellington City Libraries. This post features new books in the wonderful world of robotics, coding and dance!

Enjoy!

Robots.

Get an up-close look at all kinds of cool robots, from cyborgs and humanoids to robots in movies, with amazing images and mind-blowing facts. Also check out Coding, which ties in with the Robotics theme, and is packed with fascinating facts and amazing pictures from the world of coding.

image courtesy of syndeticsimage courtesy of syndetics

 

 

 

 

 

 

image courtesy of syndetics

Washington, DC. (City Trails)

Lonely Planet Kids has done it again with the latest release from the City Trails series all about Washington DC – Capital city of USA! Read this book and uncover of the best kept secrets, tourist attractions and more exciting information about Washington DC! Coolest attraction in this book is the house that looks like a watermelon.

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsNational Theatre : all about theatre.

Read this book and go backstage at the National Theatre and hear from experts on every aspect of stagecraft, from acting and directing to set building, costume design and prop-making. A definitive theatre book for anyone interested in theatre and acting.

 

 

image courtesy of syndetics

Top Dance Tips.

Jazz, ballet, tap, and hip hop-there are so many different sides to dance. Learn the ins and outs of dancing all sorts of styles like a pro!

 

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsBallerina : a stepbystep guide to ballet.

Leap into the world of ballet with this beautiful guide and accompanying DVD!

 

 

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsWrite to me : letters from Japanese American children to the librarian they left behind.

A touching story about Japanese American children who corresponded with their beloved librarian while they were imprisoned in World War II internment camps. Prepare to have tissues on hand. A librarian’s choice all the way!

 

Kids’ Club Review by Elaina: Fly away home

Fly away home, by Christine Nostlinger

This book is a true story about world war 2, as a eight year old suffers the disasters of the war. Though you may think this book is going to be very sad, it also has some very funny and victorious parts.

I really enjoyed this book and it gave me a wide idea of what world war two was like.

I recommend this book for girls ages 10 and up.

5 stars

Reviewed by Elaina from Tawa, 10 years old

4 new children’s non fiction you must get your hands on before school starts

Fresh in your local library! These 4 new non-fiction books are perfect for the last few days before term 3. Find a warm quiet corner and curl up with these amazing facts.

image courtesy of syndeticsOlympic Poems.

A brilliant, funny, inspiring collection of every kind of poems about sport and sporting events of every kind from PE lessons to sports day to the final men’s 100m race. Great to have on hand just in time for the Olympics.

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsThe Weird and Wonderful worlds of words.

Looking for a crash course of the English language? Then check out this amazing new book on the English language. You discover a world can play tricks on the brain and trip up the tongue, cause magic and mayhem, pleasure and pain, and fun and frustration. But overall you will discover the beauty and wonder of the English language.

Welcome to the weird and wonderful world of words.

 

image courtesy of image

Voices from the second world war.

Take a journey into world where RAF pilots, evacuees, resistance fighters, land-girls, US navy, sailors and survivors of the Holocaust and  Hiroshima bombing all tell their stories, passing on the lessons learned to a new generation.

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsFrogs Close up.

Take a closer look at these amazing amphibians. Frogs go through an amazing transformation during their life cycle, and are well adapted to living on land and in water.

Kids’ Club Review by Brianna: The Bakehouse

The Bakehouse, by Joy Cowley

The only thing Bert wants is to fight in the war – handling weapons, defending his country, and having amazing adventures. But he does not realise that his brother is up to something. Read this book to find out what…

3 stars

Reviewed by Brianna from Island Bay and St Francis De Sales School , 8 years old

Kids’ Club Review by Sarah: The Bakehouse

The Bakehouse, by Joy Cowley

This book is about anot old man who’s great grandson came to his house to learn about his family history and when he leaves the great grandfather thinks about it in his head…
The ending is strange and I didn’t like it but apart from that the book was a really good read!
I recommend this book for 8+ boys and girls

4 stars

Reviewed by Sarah from Central City and Northland School , 12 years old