Lōemis Winter Solstice Festival 2019

Winter has arrived in Wellington, and the Lōemis Winter Solstice Festival is back again, in it’s forth year,  during the week of the 14th to the 22nd of June, and there’s heaps of exciting events happening in the Capital!
image courtesy of https://www.loemis.nz/What is the Lōemis Winter Solstice Festival?: For seven days, the Lōemis Winter Solstice Festival  observes the longest nights of the year with a hearty mix of feasting, theatre, music, monstrous creatures and a fiery waterfront procession, based around the winter solstice, which falls on 22 June.

For more information on what events are on, check out the Lōemis website and Facebook page.

 

In the mean time, why not get into the “festival” season with:

 


image courtesy of syndeticsFestival folk : an atlas of carnival customs and costumes.

A beautifully illustrated compedium of weird and wonderful festival costumes around the world. All around the world there are festivals that reach back through the sands of time to the very roots of civilisation; to agrarian rites and pagan traditions. The festivals in this book are often little known outside their locale and they are all characterised by the most radical and bizarre costumes imaginable. The Kukeri in Bulgaria wear enormous headpieces made of goatskin. Burryman festival in Edinburgh features a man covered from head to toe with burrs and thorns. Paraders in Switzerland’s Silvesterklausen wear vast wood- en doll-masks and hats carved with peasant scenes. Each costume is brought to life in Rob Flower’s joyous, surrealist, urban illustra- tions. Brief, engaging texts describe the festival, its history and the traditions that surround it.

 


image courtesy of syndeticsFestivals and celebrations.

Take a trip around the world, looking at the many different ways that people celebrate special days, holidays, religious festivals and traditional celebrations. Comparing Countries is a ground breaking non-fiction dual-language series which compares and contrasts ways of life in different countries around the world. Presented in two different languages, each title explores a topic common to all children, from homes to festivals, highlighting what makes us different and what we all have in common. This series provides great support to geography learning, as well as helping young language learners improve their reading skills.

 


image courtesy of syndeticsFestivals around the world.

Learn about the diverse and vibrant festivals that are celebrated around the world.

 

 

 

 


Learn more about what happens in winter, as well the other seasons, why not head on down to your local library and grab some books about seasons, such as:

 

image courtesy of syndeticsSeasons.

Finding out about the four seasons has never been so engaging. This book is full of exciting experiments, fun puzzles, quirky humour and science facts to make you saw WOW … it’s science with a BOOM!

 

 

 


image courtesy of syndeticsWeather and the seasons.

Introduces weather and the seasons, describing what is a cloud, why rainbows form, and how animals migrate for the winter, and includes four weather-related science projects.

 

 

 


image courtesy of syndeticsWeather and seasons : questions & answers.

Have you ever wondered why we have seasons, where the wind comes from or how we predict the weather? Read this book to find out about weather and how our planet changes throughout the year.

 

 

 


image courtesy of sydneticsA stroll through the seasons.

Follow the wonderful changes that each season brings! From bright spring blossoms to dazzling summer sunshine, vibrant autumn leaves, and sparkling winter snow. Look and Wonder is a fresh, bold, and bright narrative nonfiction series introducing children to the natural world

 

 

 


Also, why not join in on “the Lōemis workshop fun”,  in the comfort of your own home… or library by creating your masterpieces, with some help from the following books:

 

image courtesy of syndeticsEasy origami decorations : an augmented reality crafting experience.

Handcrafted decorations are just a few folds away! Learn how to turn origami butterflies, swans, and tulips into locker magnets, table decorations, and more.

 

 

 


Now make this : 24 DIY projects by designers for kids.

25 of the world’s leading designers contribute one object each for kids to make themselves.

 

 

 


image courtesy of syndetics51 things to make with paper plates.

51 things to make with paper plates is perfect for those with a creative, crafty streak eager to put their skills to task on recyclable materials in the home. Perfect activities for parent and child to create together. The 51 projects feature a well-balanced mix of techniques, materials, colours and styles for a range of ages. With the easy-to-follow guidance in this book, you can make: a dragon, a hot-air balloon, a lion mask, a snowman and a barking dog hand puppet.

 

 


image courtesy of syndeticsMasks.

Making masks is easy with these creative projects which are explained with illustrated step-by-step instructions. I love Craft Masks features instructions for making fantastic masks. You could be a fairy, a pirate, a dragon or a cat. You could even make crazy glasses or a carnival mask!

 

 

 


image courtesy of syndeticsAmazing masks to make yourself : 25 projects for funny and frightening faces to wear!

From papier-mache to everyday objects like leaves or even a kitchen sieve, Masks can be made for all sorts of uses, such as going to a costume party, for a school drama production or even just to hang as decorations on a wall.

Read up on Earthquake facts

It’s been a pretty scary couple of days here in Wellington (and all over New Zealand) after the big 7.5 magnitude earthquake hit on Monday morning! Maybe it even woke you up? I thought this would be a good time to refresh our knowledge on earthquakes and what we need to do in an emergency.

 

So, what IS an earthquake?

 

The surface of the earth is covered in large rocks (or plates), which we call the earth’s crust. Earthquakes happen when these rocks move, causing a great release of energy that travels through the earth.

 

The edges where different plates in the earth’s crust meet are called fault lines, and these are often where earthquakes are most likely to centre, although people will feel them from a long way away.

 

After a major earthquake, it is also normal to feel lots of smaller aftershocks for days or even weeks afterwards. An instrument called a seismograph records and measures the size of an earthquake. Geonet keeps a record of all the earthquakes that have occurred across the country, so check out their website to see just how many aftershocks we’ve had in the past couple of days!

 

Because we never know when an earthquake might happen, it is really important that we are prepared and know what to do when an earthquake hits.

 

The first thing you need to remember if you feel an earthquake is to drop. If you are close to a sturdy table or desk, you can crouch underneath, otherwise cover your head with your arms to protect yourself from things that could fall on you. Lastly, hold your position until you feel the shaking stop, or until an adult tells you it is safe.

 

Drop, cover, hold – pretty easy right? You might like to have a quick practice now.

 

If you are interested to learn more about earthquakes, or how and why they happen, we’ve got lots of great books available through the catalogue. You might also like to read this information from Civil Defence about how to be prepared for an emergency, or check out the science kids website for more earthquake facts.

Stay safe out there!

 

Top 10 Children’s non-Fiction May 2016

Te Whanganui-a-Tara has hit the top 10! The taniwha legend portrayed by Moira Wairama has a Te Reo version, Ngā taniwha i Te Whanga-nui-a-tara in the library.

These titles are great for looking at your hometown as a site for battling behemoths and using your Māori language, these books come with a CD of the tale inside.

Creators of their own worlds are finding inspiration in both the virtual and physical world.  The creators using Lego and Minecraft are holding the sway of the listings.  Master builder Yvonne Doyle is one of the model builders used by DK publishers in their famous Lego books.

How about your own model building? What have you been inspired to build from your library loans? Let us know in the comments.

Here’s May’s top 10 list:

1.  LEGO, by Daniel Lipkowitz

2.  Minecraft, by Megan Miller

3.  Star Wars, by David West Reynolds

4.  Minecraft, by Stephanie Milton

5.  Star Wars, by Adam Bray

6.  Minecraft, by Nick Farwell

7.  Star Wars character encyclopedia, by Simon Beecroft

8.  Minecraft, by Matthew Needler and Phil Southam

9.  The taniwha of Wellington Harbour, by Moira Wairama

10. Minecraft blockopedia, by Alex Wiltshire

Children’s Day 2013

children's day

Children’s Day is all about treasuring the children in our life. This means supporting parents and encouraging positive family time.

This year Children’s Day falls on Sunday 3rd March.  The theme is ‘Treasure our Children.” So join in the fun and do something special for the small people in your life.

Events happening in Wellington on the day include Treasure Our Children Beach Day at Lyall Bay Beach and Reach for the Stars at Carter Observatory.

Check out more Children’s Day events in Wellington.

Here are some amazing activities and images for that you can color in for downloading.

For information visit the Children’s Day website.

We Are Aliens!

A new show will be on at Carter Observatory starting on November 21st.

We Are Aliens explores the possibility of life existing elsewhere in our universe through a new 360 degree digital planetarium show. Find out about what we are doing to search for alien life and whether scientists think they will find life on other planets or not. Visit this site to watch the show’s trailer.

For Harry Potter fans you’ll be pleased to know that the show is narrated by Rupet Grint, who plays Ron Weasley in the HP movies.

Sit back in Carter Observatory’s indoor planetarium and enjoy the show!

Ticket and more info here.

 

Solar Eclipse

A solar eclipse can be one of the most dramatic of celestial events and there’s one happening on November 14th.

An eclipse occurs when the Sun, Earth and Moon are lined up and we see the Moon to crossing in front of the sun. It looks like the sun is blacked out for a moment while the moon is in front of it.

The upcoming eclipse is a partial solar eclipse in New Zealand (the moon wont cover the whole sun, just a bit of it). But the further north you go the more the moon will appear to cover the sun. To see a full eclipse you’d need to be 1200kms north of New Zealand, sitting in a boat in the pacific ocean (or around where Cairns (in Australia) is).

The eclipse in Wellington will be on Wednesday November 14th between 9.26am – 11.47am, with the largest portion of sun covered (about 76%) at 10.34am.

Looking at the sun can be dangerous and harmful for our eyes. Luckily the Carter Observatory has the eclipse covered (pun!) and suggest the following ideas for viewing this cool event:

  1. Eclipse glasses (available to purchase from the Carter Observatory)
  2. Pinhole projection
  3. Welding glasses
  4. Use a telescope

Check out what the Carter Observatory has planned for the eclipse, lots of fun and learning!

Interested in Astronomy? This book has heaps of projects and things you can make and do about astronomy. Have fun spaceheads!