Olympic Games 2016 review

Olympics Week One round up for Team Kiwi!

On the morning of Friday 12 August as we slept, kiwi rowers Eric Murray and Hamish Bond won New Zealand’s first gold medal of this years Olympics in Rio. The duo also won gold at the last Olympic Games in London in 2012, when they set a world record. In fact, Eric and Hamish have been working so hard over the last few years that they have been undefeated in the last 69 races they have competed in. Phew, that’s a lot of wins! Lets have a look at how the rest of the New Zealand team did….

 

Mahe Drysdale also received a gold medal in rowing when he defended his first place title in the men’s single sculls in week two of the Games. Mahe, who went to school in Tauranga, won gold in the same event at the 2012 London Olympics, and is a five-time world champion.

In yet another rowing win, Genevieve Behrent and Rebecca Scown claimed a silver medal in the women’s pair event. This is the second medal for Rebecca, who won bronze in 2012, and a great comeback for Genevieve, who returned to rowing last year after taking a break in 2014.

 

Another successful Olympian from Tauranga, Luuka Jones scored a silver medal for her amazing efforts in the K1 canoe slalom, where competitors have to paddle downriver and upriver through hanging gates. Luuka came in at 14th place four years ago at the London Olympics, so she must have been training hard.

Natalie Rooney made Olympic history at the beginning of the first week when she won a silver medal in the women’s shooting event . Natalie, from South Canterbury, achieved the best shooting result ever for New Zealand after her Aussie competitor bet her by one point.

 

A silver medal was also awarded to Ethan Mitchell, Sam Webster and Eddie Dawkins of the New Zealand track cycling team. Ethan, Sam and Eddie, who came first in the Cycling World Championships in March, said they were very proud to win silver after the British team beat them by less than a second to snap up the gold.

This was the fourth Olympics for well-known kiwi athlete Valerie Adams, who won a silver medal this year for shot put. Valerie had been the world’s top women’s shot putter for the last 10 years, having won gold in both the 2008 and 2012 Olympics, but was beaten by her American competitor who set a national record at this years Games.

 

Finishing off our silver medal winning streak is the New Zealand women’s rugby Sevens team, who came in at second place after their game against Australia. The team, who are Rugby World Cup champions, played a great game, with member Portia Woodman toping the scoring charts for the Olympic events.

 

A huge well-done and congratulations to all our talented and dedicated Olympic athletes, you have done New Zealand proud!

Check out the library catalogue and the New Zealand Olympics website for more information.

 

Equestrian Events at the Olympic Games

Equestrian is the sport of horse riding. It is one of the few Olympic sports in which men and women can compete against each other and is the only Olympic sport that involves animals.

Olympics EquestrianIt is a unique sport in that both horse and rider are considered to be a team, and both are declared medal winners. This is to recognise that it takes many years of training by horse and rider to develop the special skills required for these events.

Equestrian has three different disciplines. They are jumping, dressage and eventing. For each of the three disciplines, there is an individual and a team event.

Equestrian events date back to the Olympic Games in ancient Greece. The Greeks would train their horses to be useful during times of war. In 680BC, chariot races and horseraces were both contested at the Greek Games.

Jumping was the first equestrian event to be included in the modern Games. It was introduced in 1900. Dressage and eventing were added in 1912.

New Zealand has 8 member in the 2016 Equestrian team. They include riders such as Sir Mark Todd, Jonathan Paget and Jonelle Price. You can find lots of information about each team member here.

You can also find out lots of information relating to equestrian and other sports here at Rio 2016 Olympics.

Go New Zealand!!!!!!

Swimming events at the Olympic Games

The swimming competitions at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro are scheduled to take place from 6 to 13 August at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium. The open-water marathon will be held on 15 and 16 August in Fort Copacabana.

Olympic SwimmingA breath-taking sport (literally!), swimming has been in the Olympic Games since Athens 1896. Men and women participate in 16 events, including relays and individual competitions in four strokes – freestyle, breaststroke, butterfly and backstroke. Swimmers must complete a set distance inside the pool, in some cases using any of the above styles, in the shortest possible time

The swimming pool at the Rio Olympics is divided into eight competition lanes, each 2.5m wide.

Most events start from starting blocks, except for backstroke, where the swimmers start from inside the pool. Swimmers must not dive in before the starting pistol is fired – if this happens, a false start is declared and the swimmer at fault is disqualified.

At the Rio Olympics there are 789 athletes from 173 different countries competing in 32 swimming events. You can find out who’s competing from New Zealand at the NZ Olympics website.

Did you know: The pool at the Rio Olympics actually consists of two pools? One for the competition events, and another for warming up. The whole huge building is temporary – it’s designed to be dismantled after the Olympics Games have finished.

 

School yourself like a fish about swimming! Here’s some awesome books from our library collection:

   

 

 

History of Brazil – the Olympics host nation

The 2016 Olympics are being hosted by a South American country called Brazil. The events will all be happening in and around one of it’s main cities – Rio de Janeiro.

Brazil is just slightly smaller than the United States of America and is the largest country in South America.

The population of Brazil is made up of AmeriIndian indigenous people, and people of Spanish and Portuguese descent.  In the year 1500 the country was colonised by Portugal and with them came the sad tradition of slavery, which impacted the lives of the indigenous population greatly. Then over the following centuries many people came from other countries arrived because they were escaping wars, looking for a warm and beautiful country and seeking adventure.

This diverse mix of different cultures has created lots of different religious, music and culinary culture that is specific to Brazil.

One really good website to find information on Brazil is ManyAnswers.

Some cool Brazil facts: Brazil is the country which has the greatest number of animal species. Two of the major cities in Brazil are Rio de Janeiro and Saō Paulo. To fid out more you can take a look at the many interesting books about Brazil in the library collection or use Oddizzi through the library website.

 

Rio de Janeiro:

Rio de Janeiro (known as ‘Rio’) is a large city in Brazil and is the host city of the 2016 Olympics. It was the first capital city of Brazil. It has a Portuguese name and was founded in 1565, but didn’t become the capital city of Brazil until 1763.

In 1960 another city called Brasilia was founded and became the new Capital City instead of Rio. A famous Brazilian architect named Oscar Niemeyer designed the city of Brasilia. It is a planned city and it is designed to look like an aeroplane when viewed from above.

Rio de Janeiro has a large Roman Catholic population, so one of it’s most famous landmarks is the large statue called Jesus Christ the Redeemer, which is on top of Corcovado Mountain and looks out over the city.

The city is also famous for a Mountain called Sugarloaf Mountain which has a cable car.

A famous dance called The Samba comes from Rio, which is a mixture of African and Brazilian music and dance. Every year before the start of Lent near Easter time there is a Festival with a big parade called a Carnival. Lots of people get dressed up for it with very elaborate costumes and dance along the parade route and go on floats. People come from all over the world to see the Carnival.

Rio is also known for its famous beautiful beaches. The Copacabana, Ipanema, Barra da Tijuca. The Copacabana beach is where some of the big Olympic events are taking place.

Many places around Rio are being use as Olympic venues, and some have had to be specially built for the Olympic sports. It must be very exciting for the people who live in Rio.

6 New Non Fiction that will keep you entertained and… safe.

We know you love the new books – they are always flying off the stands in the libraries. They smell nice, the covers are shiny, and there’s no weird stains; what’s not to love?! Here are 6 new books to find in your local library or catalogue.

 

image courtesy of syndeticsStar Wars: The Complete Visual Dictionary.

Everything you think you know about Star Wars is about to change. Read the complete visual guide to the entire Star Wars saga and gain a wealth of unique information. Holds  a fascinating visual gallery of characters and creatures of the entire Star Wars saga as they appear nowhere else. Overall one book you must get your hands on!

 

image courtesy of syndeticsBookSpeak!

Poetry about books – crazy! But this one is actually pretty cool. Trust us.

 

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsStone, bronze and iron ages.

Travel back to the time of the stone, bronze and iron ages! What was Britain like over 6,000 years ago? Who lived on the island and what was it like? Explore these ancient civilisations to understand how prehistoric people have influenced the way we live today. Discover the artefacts that give evidence of their way of life.

 

image courtesy of syndeticsArt, Culture and Sport.

This is not just another atlas! From the biggest movie producers around the world to the most attended festivals; from astounding architecture to global sporting achievements, Art, Culture and Sport takes a unique look at our globe. Using innovatively designed maps alongside infographics, graphs and icons, this book explores the bigger picture of topics such as cultures around the globe, scientific achievements, amazing sporting feats and the arts.

 

 

Keep yourself safe series

Here’s a new series of books about staying safe. No one likes to be scared or hurt, so find out how to avoid the bad feels.

image courtesy of syndeticsBeing Safe with People.

Being Safe with People looks at how to act safely and sensibly with people you meet, whether family, friends or complete strangers. It explains what ‘stranger danger’ is and gives tips on what to do if you encounter it; it explores what to do if friends are unkind or if you are bullied and it also looks very sensitively at how to deal with inappropriate behaviour from adults, even when you know them.

 

image courtesy of syndeticsBeing Safe out and about.

Being Safe Out and About looks at some of the potential dangers for children as they begin to go out and about more independently. Without being sensationalist or scary, it explains, amongst other things, how to cross the road and road safety generally, how to play sensibly in the park and to avoid risk when near water.

 

 

 

 

 

Kids’ Club Review by Brianna: The Magic Treehouse – Hour of the Olympics

The Magic Treehouse – Hour of the Olympics, by Mary Pope Osborne

“No girls allowed at the Olympic Games!” That’s the rule when the Magic Treehouse sends Jack and Annie back to ancient Greece. But when Annie tells Jack to go to the Olympic games without her, he knows she’s up to something! Will Annie find a way to see the games? Or will she get herself – and Jack – into Olympic-size trouble. Read this book to find out!

5 stars

Reviewed by Brianna from Island Bay and St Francis De Sales School , 8 years old

Kids’ Club Review by Maarama: Billie B Brown

Billie B Brown, by Sally Rippin

It was a great book for young people learning to swim and to get them to keep trying things until they get better at it. Even if you don’t do good at it the first time to keep on trying.

3 stars

Reviewed by Maarama from Karori and Karori West Normal School , 9 years old

Kids’ Club Review by Peehoo: The Deep End

The Deep End, by Sally Rippin

Billie’s class used to swim in the little pool. But this year they’re moving to the big one. Billie is scared. This is a great bedtime book. Its really good for new beginners.

4 stars

Reviewed by Peehoo from Johnsonville and Johnsonville School , 9 years old

Kids’ Club Review by Benjamin: Olympic Challenge!

Olympic Challenge!, by Mary Pope Osborne

I liked this book. I thought it was very interesting. I thought it was unfair when females could not enter the theatre. Jack and Jill, oops I mean Annie, are the main characters and are very brave.

4 stars

Reviewed by Benjamin from Cummings Park and Ngaio School , 6 years old