Daylight savings is on the horizon…..

Get ready for longer evenings and family BBQs because daylight savings is just around the corner!

Daylight saving, also called ‘summer time’ in some countries, is when we change the clocks by an hour in order to shorten or lengthen the amount of sunlight in the evenings. With summer approaching, we will be turning clocks forward so that we have an extra hour of light before the sun sets at night. Sometimes we refer to this as “springing forward” because we are currently in the Spring season. In Autumn, we “fall back” and turn the clocks back an hour so that it is dark earlier in the evenings over Winter.

The idea of daylight savings was thought up in 1895 by a New Zealander called George Hudson, although many ancient people were flexible in changing the times of their days to suit the sun and seasons.

Hudson studied entomology (insects) and astronomy (space), and wanted more leisure time in the evenings to collect insects. He presented a paper to the Wellington Philosophical Society after lots of people became interested in his idea, and the Summer-Time Act was passed in 1927 (nearly 100 years ago).

Daylight savings is practiced in lots of countries all around the world. Many people find that longer evenings allow more time for activities like sports and socialising, however it can be troublesome for some professions such as farming in which workers start their days early. Another benefit of daylight savings is that we can save on energy, as we don’t need to turn our lights on as early in the evening.

In New Zealand, daylight savings happens overnight on the last Sunday of September, which will be the 25th this year. How are you going to spend your extra time?

Check out the library catalogue for inspiration on fun outdoor activities and to learn more about seasons!

Kids’ Club Review by Francesca: Rocks

RocksRocks, by Sally Morgan

It was cool to learn about red quartz and how precious and rare it is. Enjoyed this book. Easy to put down and go back to. Easy to read with lots of facts.

3 stars

Reviewed by Francesca from Khandallah, 7 years old

6 New children’s non fiction to read just time for spring

Spring is around the corner… almost. So why not spring on down to your local library and check out some new non fiction in our Junior Collection that can help you with your science homework, help you unleash your inner clothes designer and learn some weird, wonderful and sometimes gross facts from the latest Ripley’s Believe it or not series.

 

image courtesy of syndeticsI Can Make My Own Accessories

Eat you heart out, Christian Louboutin, Karen Walker and Dolce & Gabbana, You don’t have to shop for the latest fashion trends and break your budget to dress in style. This new book, I Can Make My Own Accessories is jam packed full of ideas for making your own fashion accessories! You will be able to make and customize unique, stylish jewelry, hair accessories, bags, belts, and much more. A great book to have on hand for the budding fashion designer.

 

image courtesy of syndeticsAll new Ripley’s Believe it or not : unlock the weird

Believe it or not, it’s back! Ripley’s has a 100% new book out on the weird, wonderful and wacky world records around the world. Come on down to the library and grab this book, where you can read all about how a monk walks on water, a woman that only eats sand and a baby cow born with five mouths. You have to read it to believe it!

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsUsborne Big Picture Atlas

With 15 big and beautifully illustrated maps for you to pore over, use this picture atlas to explore our fascinating world. Find landmarks, discover where different animals and people live around the world, and lots more.

 

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsCollins Science Fascinating Facts

This book tells you all you need to know to become the next great scientist! From atoms to lightning, from android robots of the future right back to the start of life on Earth, you’ll learn all about the secrets of science. A brightly illustrated and engaging book, Science offers hours of reading pleasure and is also a great support for schoolwork and projects.

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsElectricity

“A hands-on first science series that uses fun and practical activities to explore electricity, light and dark, materials and pushes and pulls.We use electricity all the time so it’s important children know how it works and where it comes from. Discover what an electric circuit is and why static electricity makes your hair stand on end. Using simple explanations and engaging photos, this book encourages children to think about how their senses work, while taking their first steps into scientific discovery.” –Publisher’s website.

 

image courtesy of syndeticsDid dinosaurs lay eggs and other questions and answers about prehistoric reptiles

Read this and find out all the answers to every question you have ever had about dinosaurs. Also goes into full detail of  different types of dinosaurs and reconstructs their habits and behaviour.

 

8 New Children’s Non Fiction to read during August – Part Two.

Impress your friends and teachers further by surprising them with some amazing new facts about animals, world history, science and Minecraft.

Stumped on where you’re going to find these facts? From these amazing 8 new books the library has just purchased.

Get your hands on them before someone else does.

 

image courtesy of syndeticsMy first book about our world.

Read this book and find all you need to know about the wonders that take place in our world, like what makes it rain, where do penguins live and how many oceans there are. You will learn fantastic things about our world and at the same have fun doing the quizzes and puzzles enclosed in this book.

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsMinecraft : redstone and transportation.

Learn how to use redstone to build advanced Minecraft structures such as automated doors and powered mine carts.

 

 

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsCars, trucks and trains.

Have you ever wondered why and how the car was invented? From steam cars and trains to experiments with rocket powered and flying cars, It’ll Never Work: Cars, Trucks and Trains explores the history and development of vehicles that have led to the comforts of modern passenger transport that we know today. Each title in this exciting, high-interest series looks at a different area of technology and engineering and reveals the pioneering ideas and scientific thinking that enabled its development, as well as exposing those that proved to be a dead end. Each spread examines a particular example in depth, bringing in other similar ideas where relevant, and revealing that experimentation and failure often pave the way to technology success.

 

image courtesy of syndeticsDK findout! Animals.

DK findout! Animals is full of interesting facts about the animal kingdom. With beautiful photography, lively illustrations, and key curriculum information, the DK findout! series will satisfy any child who is eager to learn and acquire facts – and keep them coming back for more! It is packed with up-to-date information, fun quizzes and incredible images of mammals, birds, fish, & reptiles. Discover what makes up a bird, how animals use camouflage to hide, and which animal spends the longest time in bed.

 

image courtesy of syndeticsMinecraft Beginner’s Guide.

Minecraft is more than a simple video game. It is also a creative tool that allows players to build and explore their own virtual worlds. A bit of a novice when it comes to Minecraft? Have no fear, this book will bring you up to speed on everything you need to know about Minecraft.

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsDK findout! Dinosaurs.

DK findout! Dinosaurs is full of dinosaur facts supported by beautiful photography, lively illustrations, and key curriculum information. It is packed with up-to-date information, quizzes, fun facts and incredible images of all their favourite dinosaurs. Discover how fossils are formed, find out which was the biggest dinosaur, and what was the size of a cat. DK findout! Dinosaurs will let children uncover the ancient animals of our planet.

 

image courtesy of syndeticsThe Usborne Medieval World.

A lavishly illustrated guide to the medieval world, covering the years 500 to 1500 and following events worldwide including the Crusades, Marco Polo’s travels to China, the Maya, Aztecs and Samurai, as well as medieval knights and explorers.

 

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsHome lab : exciting experiments for budding scientists.

Want to unleash your inner mad scientist.? Homelab can help you with that.  This book will how you how to create fantastic projects, ideal from science fairs using everyday materials that you can find in your own home. Great for science projects and homework.

 

 

Digging up the past with these great children’s books

Have you ever dreamed of travelling back in time, to meet famous heroes, brave warriors, wise queens, or your own long-dead ancestors?

Have you wandered round museums admiring giant statues, glittering jewels, and mysterious mummies? Do you wonder who made them – and how, when, where and why?

If you answered yes to any of these questions then you share a vision with many adventurous archaeologist – men and women with a passion to find out about the past.

These people travel the globe in search of lost cities and buried treasures. They decipher ancient carvings and dusty documents. They learn exciting new skills and experiment with the latest technology to find out what life was like long ago. Their work takes them to all kinds of places – from deep, dark oceans to high mountaintops.

So come along for the ride and help dig up the past.

New Kids Fiction to get you through these colder winter days!

With winter settling in what better time to rug up with a warm blanket, a cup of milo and some of these new Kids Fiction books from your local library!

Hour of the BeesImage courtesy of Syndetics by Lindsay Eagar

This novel blurs the line between truth and fiction as Carol unravels the fantastical stories of her mentally ill grandfather. When she and her family move to his deserted ranch in order to transfer him to a care home, Carol struggles to cope with the suffocating heat and the effects of her grandfather’s Alzheimer’s. Bees seem to be following her around, but the drought means this is impossible. She must be imagining things. Yet when her grandfather chooses her as the subject for his stories – tales of a magical healing tree, a lake, and the grandmother she never knew – Carol sees glimmers of something special in what her parents dismiss as Serge’s madness. As she rethinks her roots and what she thought she knew about her family, Carol comes to the realization that Serge’s past is quickly catching up with her present.

 

 

How to Capture an Invisible Cat by Paul TobinImage courtesy of Syndetics

Every Friday the 13th, 6th grade genius and inventor extraordinaire Nate Bannister does three not-so-smart things to keep life interesting. This time, he taught a caterpillar math, mailed a love letter, and super-sized his cat Proton before turning him invisible.

 

 

 

Image courtesy of SyndeticsTeresa by Deborah Abela

Teresa and her family survived the bombing of their home and went hungry during the long siege of their island during the war. Life in peace time is still hard. Her parents want a better life, and so apply to migrate to Australia to find it. But after the long voyage to Sydney, there are more testing times ahead for Teresa as she tries to learn Australian ways, avoid the bullies and do well at school. She is not about to let anything stop her from making her family and her nanna back in Malta proud of her.

 

 

Image courtesy of SyndeticsThe Secrets we Keep by Nova Weetman

Clem Timmins has lost everything – her clothes, her possessions, her house and her mum. Now living in a tiny flat with her dad, Clem has to start a new school and make new friends. On her first day, Clem tells Ellie that her mum died in a house fire and immediately regrets it when Ellie latches on and confides that her own mother is dying of cancer. When Clem receives a letter she doesn’t want to read, it becomes clear she can’t run from her past forever, especially when the truth appears right in front of her face.

 

 

Wicked’s WayImage courtesy of Syndetics by Anna Fienberg

Will could walk a tightrope and juggle bananas as he went. ‘One day you’ll be the star of a circus,’ his mother told him. ‘But until then, you must be a secret.’ For each year pirates came to the islands to steal young boys for their crew. And if that happened to you, well, you may as well kiss your life goodbye. So what’s a young lad to do when his mother disappears and pirates arrive at his door?..Will takes courage from a crazy truth-telling parrot, and his mother’s advice: ‘Keep putting one foot in front of the other and your eyes on the prize.’ But will this be enough to survive the perils at sea? And will that infuriatingly polite boy called Horrendo finally tip the balance?..A high-seas pirate adventure about scoundrels and blaggards, devilish treachery, and finding the most precious treasure of all…

Kids’ Club Review by Hayley: Leonardo and the flying boy

Leonardo and the flying boy, by Lournee Anholt

Leonardo had a dream that people would fly one day. He loved to explore and he was also a scientist, sculptor, painter and musician. My favourite part of the story was at the end because it was colourful and people were ‘flying’ in the air after many trials from Leonardo.

4 stars

Reviewed by Hayley from Tawa, 6 years old