Kids’ Club Review by Lily: How to bee

How to beeHow to bee, Bren MacDibble

I really enjoyed this book as it made me think about how this world would have to function without bees. Peony is a brave and all round kindhearted character who just wants the best for her and her family and I think that she is just the type of character that a story like this needs.

4 stars

Reviewed by Lily from Kilbirnie and Seatoun School , 12 years old

Kids’ Club Review by Lulu: How to bee

How to beeHow to bee, Bren MacDibble

Full of adventure about family, friends and passion. Great read and the only downfall is that it ends!

4 stars

Reviewed by Lulu from Kilbirnie and Seatoun School , 12 years old

Kids’ Club Review by Molly: Cosmic : it’s one giant leap for all boy-kind

Cosmic : it's one giant leap for all boy-kindCosmic : it’s one giant leap for all boy-kind, Frank Cottrell Boyce ; illustrated by Steven Lenton

Liam is extremely tall and often gets mistaken as an adult. One day he told some lies, went to a theme park, almost stole a car, and then ended up in space. I enjoyed reading this book as it was amusing and exciting. I would recommend it to children 8+.

4 stars

Reviewed by Molly from Karori and Karori Normal School , 11 years old

Kids’ Club Review by Molly: How to bee

How to beeHow to bee, Bren MacDibble

How to bee is about a called Peony who really wishes she was a bee. She lives on a farm and although life is hard, it is full of affection. Her mother and partner, however, turn up and ruin it all by taking her away to live in a city. Will she ever be able to get back to the farm? I thought this was a beautifully written book with a unique plot. I think it is suitable for children 9+.

5 stars

Reviewed by Molly from Karori and Karori Normal School , 11 years old

Kids’ Club Review by Anna: Cosmic : it’s one giant leap for all boy-kind

Cosmic : it's one giant leap for all boy-kindCosmic : it’s one giant leap for all boy-kind, Frank Cottrell Boyce ; illustrated by Steven Lenton

Liam is very tall for his age. So tall in fact that some people think he is an adult. Liam tells some lies, goes to a theme park, and ends up in space. I really enjoyed reading this book because it had a great plot and was very funny. Children 8+ would also enjoy this book.

5 stars

Reviewed by Anna from Karori and Karori Normal School , 9 years old

Kids’ Club Review by Anna: How to bee

How to beeHow to bee, Bren MacDibble

Peony wants to be a bee. She lives on a farm and it is a hard life but there is love. One day her mother turns up and takes her away to live in the city to be a servant to a rich family. Will Peony ever be able to come back to the farm? I thought this book was captivating and I had trouble putting it down to do other things. It had a great plot and Peony was very brave, like all girls should be. I recommend this book to children 9+.

5 stars

Reviewed by Anna from Karori and Karori Normal School , 9 years old

Kids’ Club Review by Sophia: 5 worlds. Book 1, The sand warrior

5 worlds. Book 1, The sand warrior5 worlds. Book 1, The sand warrior,  by Mark Siegel, and Alexis Siegel

This book is about three children on an adventure. They have to fight as they explore the 5 worlds. There are some surprises along the way.

I really liked the story and I think everyone should have a chance to read it. I think this suits people who like action books. There is some fighting so would be best for over 4 year olds. I did not find it scary but some younger children might.

5 stars

Reviewed by Sophia from Newtown and Newtown School , 7 years old

Reward yourself with these fantastic new kids fiction books

Not so normal Norbert by James PattersonImage courtesy of Syndetics

Normal Riddle lives in the United State of Earth, where normal means following the rules, never standing out and being exactly the same as everyone else. He’s been normal his whole life – until a moment of temporary hilarity when he does a funny impression of the country’s dictator and gets caught. Now Norbert’s been banished to the Astronuts Camp on planet Zorquat 3, where kids who defy the rules are exiled forever. He’s been taught his whole life that different is wrong, but everyone at Astronuts seems crazy creative, or are they just plain crazy?


Image courtesy of SyndeticsWar is Over by David Almond

It’s 1918, and war is everywhere. John’s dad is fighting in the trenches far away in France. His mum works in the munitions factory just along the road. His teacher says that John is fighting, too, that he is at war with enemy children in Germany. One day, in the wild woods outside town, John has an impossible moment: a meeting with a German boy named Jan. John catches a glimpse of a better world, in which children like Jan and himself can come together, and scatter the seeds of peace. Gorgeously illustrated by David Litchfield, this is a book to treasure.


Sea; Huntress Trilogy #1 by Sarah DriverImage courtesy of Syndetics

‘In the sky, the fire spirits dance and ripple. Grandma says they showed our Tribe that I’d be a captain, before I was even born. Ever since Ma died, Mouse has looked after her little brother, Sparrow, dreaming of her destiny as captain of the Huntress. But now Da’s missing, Sparrow is in danger, and a deathly cold is creeping across Trianukka. Sea-churning, beast-chattering, dream-dancing, whale-riding, terrodyl-flying, world-saving adventure”–Publisher’s description.


Image courtesy of SyndeticsThe case of the left handed Lady by Nancy Springer

Pursued by her much older brother, famed detective Sherlock Holmes, fourteen-year-old Enola, disguised and using false names, attempts to solve the kidnapping of a baronet’s sixteen-year-old daughter in nineteenth-century London.


The Slightly alarming tale of the Whispering Wars by Jaclyn Moriarty

I was taken by Whisperers at 2pm, so I never pulled the lever for the laundry chute. That’s what bothered me most. This is way ahead in the story, though. A lot happened before that. The town of Spindrift is frequented by pirates, Shadow Mages and charlatans. It’s also home to the Orphanage School, where Finlay lives with Glim, Taya and Eli. Just outside town is the painfully posh Brathelthwaite Boarding School, home to Honey Bee, Hamish and Victor, Duke of Ainsley. When the two schools compete at the Spindrift Tournament, stakes are high, tensions are higher, and some people are out to win at any cost. Before long, the orphans and the boarding school are in an all-out war. And then Whispering Wars break out, and Spindrift is thrust onto the front lines. Children are being stolen, Witches, Sirens and a deadly magical flu invade the town, and all attempts to fight back are met with defeat. Finlay, Honey Bee and their friends must join forces to outwit the encroaching forces of darkness, rescue the stolen children, and turn the tide of the war. But how can one bickering troupe outwit the insidious power of the Whisperers? And who are the two mysterious figures watching them from the shadows?