5 New Non Fiction for your reading pleasure!

Hey Kids! More new non fiction in the Wellington City Libraries collection for your reading pleasure! Featured in this post are books about lego (and space!), awesome science projects good for your brain, where the world of mathematics and computers collides and much, much more!

Enjoy!

image courtesy of syndeticsBrick by Brick: Space.

What’s better than space or building with LEGO bricks? Building amazing space projects out of your LEGO bricks, of course! Brick by Brick Space provides more than twenty-five amazing projects to build with your LEGO bricks. Follow the easy step-by-step instructions to create space stations, satellites, planets, rocket ships, and more.

Also check out Brick by brick dinosaurs.

 

image courtesy of syndeticsCan I touch your hair? : poems of race, mistakes, and friendship?

Irene Latham, who is white, and Charles Waters, who is black, present paired poems about topics including family dinners, sports, recess, and much more. This relatable collection explores different experiences of race in America. Great for ages 8 and up. Just in time for Race Relations Day.

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsAttack on Circuit City.

Hot from the Maths Quest series, check out Attack on Circuit City, where you must thwart the attacks using your statistical knowledge. Finding the answers enables readers to advance through the story, learning more about maths – focusing on statistics – with every step they take. Clues are dotted along the way, and wrong turns will direct readers towards the right answer! Action, adventure and mathematics all rolled into one amazing book!

 

image courtesy of syndeticsBrain Lab for kids.

“Brain Lab for Kids is an interactive and hands-on book that takes readers on an exciting journey into the functions of the brain through enlightening experiments and creative activities.”– Provided by publisher.

 

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsMy first ballet class : a book with foldout pages!

A cute little interactive book for young children that features foldout pages and use photographic images to detail the basic dance instructions involved in ballet.

 

 

 

 

6 New Non Fiction to read in the new year.

Happy New Year! Welcome to the first junior non fiction blog post of 2018! Featured are books all about science experiments, a follow up of successful women who changed the world and made history, history at its most horrible and entertainment thrown in for good measure.

Enjoy!

image courtesy of syndetics365 Weird Wonderful Science Experiments.

Whether you’re making your own slime, rockets, crystals, and hovercrafts or performing magic (science!) tricks and using science to become a secret agent, this book has something for every type of curious kid. Each experiment features safety precautions, materials needed, step-by-step instructions with illustrations, fun facts, and further explorations.

 

image courtesy of syndeticsMore girls who rocked the world.

“From the inspiring author of Girls Who Rocked the World comes another comprehensive collection of true, inspiring profiles of successful young women throughout history who made their mark on the world before turning twenty. Young women today crave strong, independent role models to look to for motivation. In the follow-up to the bestseller Girls Who Rocked the World, More Girls Who Rocked the World offers a fun and uplifting collection of influential stories with forty-five more movers and shakers who made a difference before turning twenty. From Annie Oakley and Queen Victoria to Malala Yousafzai and Adele–each with her own incredible story of how she created life-changing opportunities for herself and the world–you’ll get to know these capable queens of empires and courageous icons of entertainment. Also included are profiles of gutsy teenagers who are out there rocking the world right now and personal aspirations from today’s young women”– Provided by publisher. Also check out Girls who rocked the world.

image courtesy of syndeticsThe Big Earth Book.

Planet Earth. Four elements. Once incredible story. Get ready for a roller-coaster ride through history, geography, science and more. Take an amazing journey into the planet’s past and discover how four elements — earth, fire, air and water — created the world and everything that exists today. This book combines amazing facts with stunning photography and hand-drawn illustrations to bring our planet and its past to life in an exciting and engaging way.

IMAGE COURTESY OF SYNDETICSF2 Football Academy.

Take your football skills to the next level with the world’s biggest football YouTubers, the F2.F2: Football Academy features the greatest players, the biggest teams, and most jaw-dropping moments from across the football world, and teaches the skills and the tekkers it takes to be the best!Want step-overs like Sanchez? Or a pile-driver like Ibrahimovic? Or quick-feet like Messi? Let the F2 show you how. Filled with tips and hacks, as well as the inside track on your favourite stars: Pogba, Suarez, Aguero and the rest. With a free app that brings the book to life and shows you how to turbo-charge your tekkers, there’s not a moment to lose open, read, learn, download and get out on the pitch and practice. Love, peace and tekkers.

image courtesy of syndeticsThe last Jedi : the visual dictionary.

This book presents a guide to the characters, droids, aliens, and creatures of “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” with details on costumes, weapons, and accessories.

 

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsHorrible Histories: 25th Anniversary Yearbook.

This is a must-have for all Horrible Histories fans. Packed with foul facts, gory games, dreadful jokes, quick quizzes and putrid puzzles, it’s a yearbook with rat-itude! Discover all the dreadful details about your favourite eras of history from the Rotten Romans, to the Terrible Tudors and the Gorgeous Georgians to the Woeful World Wars. History has never been so horrible!

 

Kids’ Club Review by Oscar Lyon:

Te kaihanga māpere, nā Sacha Cotter

I read this at school, It was about a girl who tried to make her own marble and it took a long time to give the marble a name.

3 stars

Reviewed by Oscar Lyon from Miramar and Seatoun School , 7 years old