6 New Non Fiction

Hey kids!

Check more and amazing new junior non fiction books added to the children’s collection at Wellington City Libraries! Check out great books on history, exploring, outdoor adventures and a classic fairy tale retold.

Enjoy!

 

image courtesy of syndeticsMeet the Ancient Egyptians.

With vibrant artwork and snappy text, learning about Ancient Egypt has never been cooler! Get to know the basics on from gods and worship to mummification, with easy, humorous text that is reminiscent of the best-selling Horrible Histories series. James Davies’ stunning artwork and infographics provide a fresh non-fiction approach. Age 6+.

 

image courtesy of syndetics

Also check out Meet the Ancient Romans and get to know the ancient Romans and history in this bright and snappy series. A great way to learn and have a laugh at the same time.

 

 

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsUltimate explorer guide : explore, discover, and create your own adventures with real National Geographic explorers as your guides.

Filled with in depth information and inspiration, this book will take you on a daring adventure through the land, sea and ski. A great handbook for budding explorers looking for an adventure.

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsThe New Zealand Wars.

“The story of the 19th century New Zealand Wars, a part of New Zealand’s history that many people wish they knew more about. The book describes how the wars came about, where and when they were fought, who was involved, and how they affected women and children. It explains the emergence of Kīngitanga or Māori King movement, the land confiscations and the story of Parihaka. Other chapters look at war memorials, graves and monuments, the work of the Waitangi Tribunal, how the wars have featured in New Zealand art, music and literature, and how they are being remembered today, including new ways of working towards understanding and reconciliation. The story is told in an accessible way full of fascinating detail, eye-witness accounts, illustrations and little known facts, with lists of websites, resources and books for those who want to discover more.”–Publisher description.

 

image courtesy of syndeticsSnowWhite and the seven dwarfs : a tale from the Brothers Grimm.

This book retells the classic fairy tale of Snow White and the seven dwarfs. Overall a beautifully retold tale with stunning and captivating illustrations. A librarian’s choice all the way!

 

 

 

image courtesy of syndetics101 fun outdoor activities for children : have fun outside!

The pillars of play, explore, learn and arts and crafts come together in 101 outdoor activities for children. Take a journey in the great outdoors with this amazing book filled with 101 activities that will keep you busy from dawn until dusk.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NZ Book Awards for Children and Young Adults – Non Fiction Award Finalists!

Check it out, kids! Wellington City Libraries are jam packed full of Non Fiction goodies that have been shortlisted for the New Zealand Book Awards – Whoohoo! So what are you waiting for, come on down to the library or place a reserve to ensure you get hold of one or all of these amazing books that will widen your knowledge of New Zealand wildlife, creatures and some good old fashioned history.

Enjoy!

image courtesy of syendticsFrom Moa to Dinosaurs: Explore & discover ancient New Zealand.

Prepare to go on a journey where you will get a glimpse of the animals that lived in ancient New Zealand just before people arrived. It then goes back in time, providing snapshots of particular periods, as far back as 180 million years ago. The range of animals covered in this book include: moa and other extraordinary birds that are now extinct; crocodilians and turtles; the shark-toothed dolphin and giant penguins; dinosaurs such as sauropods and theropods; as well as those resilient survivors who can still be found in New Zealand today, such as kiwi, native bats, giant weta and tuatara. Overall I found this beautifully illustrated and a wonderful resource that will intrigue and encourage children to learn something about the origins of New Zealand.

 

image courtesy of syndeticsJack and Charlie: Boys of the bush.

“The true story of two boys who live on the wild and rugged West Coast of the South Island. Join Jack and Charlie as they go whitebaiting and fishing, panning for gold, chopping wood with their tomahawks, firing at targets with their bows and arrows, plucking ducks, camping in the bush and rafting down rivers”–Publisher information.

 

image courtesy of sydneticsThe Cuckoo and the Warbler.

This book tells the true story of one of the most remarkable wildlife relationships in New Zealand, between pipiwharauroa, the shining cuckoo, and riroriro, the grey warbler. It is a story of tragedy, trickery and faithful care – and it plays out each spring and summer in the forests of Aotearoa. Although rarely seen by humans, the interaction of these two native birds is a striking example of nature’s inventiveness. Overall a beautiful, heart warming story that can be enjoyed by children and adults.

The Genius of Bugs.

Discover a world of insects as you have never seen it before. “Inspired by the science exhibition Bug Lab, which was brought to Wellington in December 2016 by Te Papa and Weta Workshop”, The Genius of Bugs presents a cast of amazing and unexpected bugs, from the killer brain-surgeon jewel wasp to the master-of-disguise orchid mantis, to the New Zealand favourite, the wētā”–Publisher information. This book is guaranteed to be a favourite.

Torty and the Soldier.

“Meet Torty! She’s one tough little tortoise with a beat-up shell and some missing toes. Torty survived a great war that raged in Europe one hundred years ago. She was rescued back then by a young Kiwi solder. Torty is a true World War One survivor. “–Publisher information. This book is in one word – AWESOME! and is a book that can be enjoyed by children and adults.

Movie Review: Footrot Flats: A Dog’s Tale.

Rattle your dags, boys and girls and feast your eyes on an oldie but a goodie Kiwi Classic and childhood favourite of mine that comes to the small screen in the form of Footrot Flats: A Dog’s Tale. Featuring the characters from the late Murray Ball’s “Footrot Flats” – New Zealands most beloved local cartoon strip.

image couresty of Amazon.com

Join Dog, Jess, Wal, Cooch, Horse, Major, Rangi, Pongo, Cheeky and “those bloody Murphys” , where Dog goes on ‘a journey of a thousand miles’, and an epic adventure. You will bear witness to his first encounter with the sexy Jess, his loyal devotion to Wal Footrot, whom he saves from a fate worse than death; his adventures with Horse, the cat with the barracuda jaw and fishhook claws; his brilliant cowardice and mighty nose, pitted against the dastardly schemes of the villainous Murphys, their hell hounds and the Croco Pigs.

This film will also keep you entertained and glued to the small screen. Not to mention it’s jam packed full of Kiwi words, sayings and slang and references to Kiwi culture! The soundtrack, by Dave Dobbyn is mind blowing filled with famous popular Kiwi classics such as Slice of Heaven and You Oughta to be in love. Overall this film is VERY FUNNY! I laughed all the way through, especially during the part where Wal is serenading Cheeky with a love ballad  aka You Oughta to be in love, (see youtube clip down below!), Dog gets ambushed by an army of rats and the battle to the death with the deadly croco-pigs!

A film that can be enjoyed by all ages and a great film to watch with the family over fish and chips on a Saturday night. 6/10 all the way!

 

New Zealand’s Olympic Heroes

New Zealand’s Olympic story began in 1908 and over the years Kiwi athletes have given us many memorable moments and have earned New Zealand the reputation for punching above its weight.

Our first Olympians competed as part of an ‘Australasian’ team in 1908 where Harry Kerr from Taranaki won our first medal with a bronze in the 3500m walk.

Our first official New Zealand team was in 1920 which included only four athletes. Darcy Hadfield was part of this team and he won a bronze medal in the single sculls.

New Zealand’s first individual gold medal winner was won by Ted Morgan in boxing at Amsterdam in 1928. And Yvette William became our first women gold medal winner in the long jump at the 1952 Helsinki games.

 

New Zealand has excelled in a variety of sports at different times. In the 1960s our runners did well. In the late 1960s and 1970s rowing became very successful. The 1980s saw a rise in New Zealand water sports such as canoeing, swimming and sailing. The 1980s and 1990s was a great time for our equestrians and in the 1990s our cyclist began to make their mark.

Some of our more notable Olympic medal winners include Peter Snell. He won three Olympic gold medals in track & field and in 2000 he was voted New Zealand Athlete of the Century. John Walker was our great miler, winning gold in the 1500m race (often consider the glamour event of the track & field) at the 1976 Montreal Olympic.

Then there is Ian Ferguson our canoeing great. Few New Zealanders have competed in more Olympic Games and no one has won as many medals or as many golds.

 

Lets not forget our current gold medal winners that are competing at the Rio Olympics now. Greats such at Valerie Adams, Lisa Carrington, Mahe Drysdale, and Mark Todd

If you would like to learn more about our great medal winning athletes as well as all our other athletes competing at the Rio games then click here.

Go New Zealand!!!

Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori: Māori Language Week

arohatialogoKia ora tamariki! That means ‘hello kids’! This week in Aoteroa New Zealand we celebrate a very special event that doesn’t happen anywhere else in the world: Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori, Māori Language Week.

When English speakers began arriving in New Zealand over 200 years ago, Māori was the main language spoken, and many settlers had to learn te reo so that they could trade with the Māori people.

However, as more Pākehā (white skinned) came to our country and Māori people learned to speak in English, te reo was used less and less.

At school, Māori children were often encouraged to speak in English only, and some were even punished for speaking in their native tongue.

iStock_000008775653SmallBy the mid-late 1900s (about 50 years ago), very few New Zealanders were able to speak fluent te reo, and people became concerned that the Māori language was dying out.

As a result of this, te reo Māori was recognised as an official language of New Zealand in 1987, and Māori Language Week was started the same year to help promote the language and encourage the use of te reo Māori in everyday life.

Nowadays, te reo is a well known aspect of Māori culture and an important part of New Zealand’s history. It is taught in schools and kindergartens, and children can even go to special schools called Kura Kaupapa that only speak in te reo.

The use of Māori words in everyday life is also much more common, and you have probably seen signs in te reo around your local community, at the library and at school.

iStock_000018236895SmallBut even though we have made some really great improvements over the last 30 years, we still have a long way to go. You can do your bit by using te reo this week.

Here is a useful phrase to get you started:

Q. ‘Kei te pehea koe?’ (How are you?)

A. ‘Kei te pai!’ (I am good) ……….Or you might also be ‘harikoa’ (happy), ‘pouri’ (sad) or ‘hemokai’ (hungry).

Check out our Māori language books on the library catalogue!

 

4 New Non Fiction: Heroes and Wizards vs Zombies and Monsters.

image courtesy of syndeticsBeastworld: Terrifying Monsters and Mythical Beasts.

Step into a spine-chilling world of terrifying mythical beasts from ancient myths, strange sightings and folklore. Mythical beasts includes Bigfoot, the Loch ness monster and the kraken.

 

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsHarry Potter: The Character Vault.

Unlock new information about your favourite characters from the Harry Potter movies with this book profiling the good, the bad, and everything in between. Concept art, behind-the-scenes imagery, and film stills track everyone from Harry, Hermione and Ron to Dobby, Mad-Eye Moody and Dolores Umbridge, telling their complete stories as they evolve throughout the film series. A must read for all the Harry Potter fans out there.

 

image courtesy of syndeticsZombies: The truth behind history’s terrifying flesh-eaters.

Zombies, are they real or some made up story? Only reading Zombies: The truth behind history’s terrifying flesh-eaters, will allow to separate fact from fiction. This book describes ancient history, medieval lore, and modern portrayals of zombies in today’s popular culture. A must read for anyone who is interested in information about zombies… or who wants to prepare for a zombie apocalypse.

 

image courtesy of syndeticsPaws of Courage: True Tales of Heroic dogs that protect and serve.

Inside each courageous canine beats the heart of a hero. Readers will cheer for the hero dogs featured in this collection, profiled with stunning photos and inspiring tales of bravery, friendship, heroism, and devotion. Great for ages 10 years and over.

 

 

Who are New Zealand’s cultural icons?

Here’s a great website to tuck away in your favourites for future homework. It’s called Cultural Icons.

Go here to watch recordings of interviews sharing the histories, stories and experiences of some of New Zealand’s most significant arts and culture contributors.

You may not have heard of many of the New Zealanders features on this site, but they are all fascinating people – artists, mountaineers, activists, environmentalists, writers, poets, musicians, film-makers, dancers and more! Next time you need to do and assignment on a famous New Zealander, why not choose one from here?

You can find a complete list of the cultural icons that have been interviewed so far and watch their videos, and there are some great links to other informative NZ websites.

Cultural Icons

Kids’ Club Review by Niko: Josephine off the Rails

Josephine off the Rails, by Diane Miller

I like this book because you can visit the train from this book – Josephine at the Early settlers museum in Dunedin. I liked the dog – Ralph and the adventure they had on the old rail trail. I liked like pictures in the book .

3 stars

Reviewed by Niko from Wadestown and Otari School , 5 years old