Finalists, finally!

It’s always tough waiting for this one every year. Luckily you can munch on FREE Hell Pizza while you wait.

But.. the wait is over! Today the finalists for the NZ Children’s and Young Adult Book Awards have been announced. These are the best books written or illustrated by New Zealanders in the last year:

 

Picture Book:

Granny McFlitter the Champion Knitter, written by Heather Haylock and illustrated by Lael Chisholm

 

 

 

 

I am Jellyfish, written and illustrated by Ruth Paul

 

 

 

 

 

That’s Not the Monster We Ordered, written by Richard Fairgray and Terry Jones, and illustrated by Richard Fairgray

 

 

 

 

The Gift Horse, written by Sophie Siers and illustrated by Katharine White

 

 

 

 

The Longest Breakfast, written by Jenny Bornholdt and illustrated by Sarah Wilkins

 

 

 

 

 

Junior Fiction:

How Not to Stop a Kidnap Plot, written by Suzanne Main

 

 

 

 

 

How to Bee, written by Bren MacDibble

 

 

 

 

 

Lyla: Through My Eyes – Natural Disaster Zones, written by Fleur Beale (Also available as an eBook)

 

 

 

 

Dawn Raid, written by Pauline (Vaeluaga) Smith

 

 

 

 

 

The Thunderbolt Pony, written by Stacy Gregg (Also available as a Digital Audiobook)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Junior Non-Fiction:

Aotearoa: The New Zealand Story, written by Gavin Bishop

 

 

 

 

 

Explore! Aotearoa, written by Bronwen Wall and illustrated by Kimberly Andrews

 

 

 

 

New Zealand’s Great White Sharks, written by Alison Balance

 

 

 

 

 

Sky High: Jean Batten’s Incredible Flying Adventures, written by David Hill and illustrated by Phoebe Morris

 

 

 

 

The New Zealand Wars, Written by Philippa Werry

 

 

 

 

 

 

Illustration:

Abel Tasman: Mapping the Southern Lands, illustrated by Marco Ivančić

 

 

 

 

Bobby, the Littlest War Hero, illustrated by Jenny Cooper

 

 

 

 

 

Giants, Trolls, Witches, Beasts, illustrated and written by Craig Phillips (also available as a eBook)

 

 

 

 

I am Jellyfish, written and illustrated by Ruth Paul

 

 

 

 

 

 

Te Reo Māori:

Tu Meke Tūī! Written by Malcolm Clarke, translated by Evelyn Tobin and illustrated by Hayley King (Also available in English)

 

 

 

 

Hineahuone, written and illustrated by Xoë Hall and translated by Sian Montgomery-Neutze

Te Tamaiti me te Aihe, written and illustrated by Robyn Kahukiwa and translated by Kiwa Hammond

 

 

Check out the YA (and other) categories.

 

The winners will be announced on August 8th. Stay tuned…

Kids’ Club Review by Maria: The volume of possible endings : Dorrity’s tale in five parts

The volume of possible endings : Dorrity’s tale in five parts, by Barbara Else

This was my favourite book out of the rest of them (The Travelling Restaurant, The Queen and the Nobody Boy and The Knot Impossible.)Dority my favourite character as well as the main character makes friends with metal boy. They both get captured but also both escapes together but Dority gets captured again and metal boy gets put in prison. They both make as well as get a daring rescue. This book was a great book everyone should be able to read it.

5 stars

Reviewed by maria from Brooklyn, 9 years old

Kids’ Club Review by Nashe: How Māui slowed the sun

How Māui slowed the sunHow Māui slowed the sun, by Peter Gossage (1946-)

Maui and his brothers get flax they weaved in the night they walked to the suns pit Maui and his brothers build a wall then they hid behind it they you ed the ropes Maui ” said don’t trow the ropes when I say so then they trow the rope the end

3 stars

Reviewed by Nashe from Tawa and , 9 years old

Kids’ Club Review by Aoi: Just one more

Just one moreJust one more, by Joy Cowley

I really enjoyed reading this book. My favorites stories are the bag of smiles, The traveling bath and Do not wake the baby. Those stories are very interesting. I like Joy Cowley’s book very much.

5 stars

Reviewed by Aoi from Karori and Thorndon School , 7 years old

Kids’ Club Review by Luke: Hunter

HunterHunter, by Joy Cowley

This book is about two people 200 years apart both in a dangerous situations. One is a girl whose plane has crashed called Jordan and the other is a maori slave called Hunter. Will Jordan and Hunter survive? This is an exhilarating novel so therefore I rate it 5 stars. I think children 9+ should read this book.

5 stars

Reviewed by Luke from Karori and Karori Normal School , 12 years old