Matariki, Matariki, Matariki – te tau hou o te iwi Māori e!

Tēnā koutou kātoa! Join us in celebrating Matariki at Wellington City Libraries this winter! Matariki means “tiny eyes,” or “eyes of god,” and is celebrated in June and early July when a group of stars called the Pleiades rises above the horizon. Many Māori tribes have used the rising of Matariki to mark the beginning of the new year. It’s a time of celebration and reflection, of whānau and of kōrerorero — and a time to cook and eat delicious kai! Whether you want to celebrate with others or just learn more about this wonderful festival, your library has you covered with books, resources and events for the whole family.

Many of our usual preschool storytime and Kōhunga Kōrero sessions this month will be Matariki-themed, but we’re also running special Matariki events with stories, songs and crafts for tamariki and their families at some libraries — ask your local librarian if you’d like to find out more:

Cummings Park (Ngaio) Library: Monday 18th June, 6:30pm
Ruth Gotlieb (Kilbirnie) Library: Wednesday 20th June, 4:00pm
Island Bay Community Centre: Thursday 21st June, 10:30am
Karori Library: Thursday 21st June, 6:30pm
Mervyn Kemp (Tawa) Library: Thursday 28th June, 3:30pm
Khandallah Library: Thursday 28th June, 6:30pm
Johnsonville Library: Friday 29th June, 3:30pm
 
Also, check out some of our favourite Matariki books and resources below. As always, you can check our catalogue for more!

Matariki / Holt, Sharon
“The newest book in the popular award winning Te Reo Singalong series follows a family through their Matariki celebrations over the course of a day. The family wakes at dawn to see the Matariki star cluster and the book takes the family as visitors arrive for a traditional Matariki feast. As the evening draws in, the children create their own stars using sparklers. Each Te Reo Singalong book includes a song CD, English translation, guitar chords and extension ideas. This book also includes information about Matariki.” (Catalogue)
 

Ngā whetū Matariki whānakotia / Kamo, Miriama
“Behind dusty orange hills, where the sky stretches down to the sea, theres a magical, wild, windy place called Te Mata Hapuku. Sam and Te Rerehua love to visit their Grandma and Poua at Te Mata Hapuku (aka Birdlings Flat). They like to collect agate from the stories, with a backdrop of whipping wind, flashing torchlight, and the splash of Pouas gaff in the water. But one night, Grandma notices something mysterious. Someone has stolen some stars from the sky.” (Catalogue)
 

Tawhirimātea : a song for Matariki / Pitman-Hayes, June “Singer/songwriter June Pitman-Hayes wrote this waiata for the children at the Montessori School where she was teaching music. With its delightful, lyrical melody, it warmly weaves together aspects of Māori mythology with the seasons, as a family welcomes Matariki.
A te reo Māori version by Ngaere Roberts is also included in the book and on the CD.” (Scholastic)
 

The little kiwi’s Matariki / Slade-Robinson, Nikki “The little kiwi is fast asleep in her burrow. A beam of moonlight shines right down into her burrow. She wakes, and realises it is time […] This gentle tale about celebrating Matariki, the Maori New Year, finishes with an explanation of Matariki – its origins, traditions and how it is celebrated today. The constellation is also shown, with the Maori names for each star. The text contains some simple words in Te Reo Maori alongside the English equivalent.” (adapted from Catalogue)

Kids’ Club Review by Francesca: The seven kites of Matariki

The seven kites of MatarikiThe seven kites of Matariki, by Calico McClintock

I enjoy poetry at my school and wrote a Matariki poem. This story is about Mataraki – which is the name for the Maori New Year. The sisters build kites. The kites represent a star in the sky. I liked the story and the illustrations and the designs on the clothes and kites. A good read for all ages.

4 stars

Reviewed by Francesca from Khandallah and , 8 years old

Come and Celebrate Matariki!

As the nights draw in and the days get shorter it’s time to snuggle up and share stories with friends and family. Step back in time and discover the myths and legends of long ago that helped shape Aotearoa. Listen to the legends of Matariki and how those stars came into being so that next time you look up at the night sky it will have a whole new meaning for you.

This is the time to celebrate the Māori New Year and we would love you to join us for a special Matariki story time. Come and write a wish on a star and hang it up for the New Year – wishes for your family, peace in the World or your best friend. What’s your wish going to be?

Star Wishes from the 19th – 30th of June at Wellington City Libraries

 

Matariki Story Times:

Tawa: 1st June 6pm

Brooklyn: 19th June at 6pm

Central: 21st June 6pm

Kilbirnie: 22nd June 6pm

Johnsonville 23rd June 6pm

Khandallah: 29th June 6pm

Keep looking at the blog for more about Matariki!

Matariki: What is it all about?

iStock_000002751348SmallMatariki, the Māori New Year, means ‘tiny eyes’ or ‘eyes of god’ and is celebrated in June when a small group of stars called Pleiades rises above the horizon, bringing the old year to a close and starting a new year.

According to myth, when Ranginui, the sky father, and Papatūānuku, the earth mother, were separated by their children, the god of the winds, Tāwhirimātea, became so angry that he tore out his eyes and threw them into the heavens.

Various Māori tribes celebrated Matariki at different times. Some held festivities when Matariki was first seen in the dawn sky; others celebrated after the full moon rose or at the beginning of the next new moon. The full moon was celebrated in Wellington on June 6 this year, making the start of Matariki.

iStock_000008775653_SmallMatariki is celebrated for the rest of month, and different tribes and Iwi celebrate the New Year in a variety of different ways. Traditionally, Matariki was a time to finish storing food for the winter, weave new clothing and baskets, listen to the stories of our ancestors, and learn about the natural world.

Nowadays, New Zealanders are more likely to get together with family and friends, talk about Māori myths and culture, look at the stars through telescopes, and watch kapa haka performances.

If you want to learn more about Matariki, head on over to our catalogue, or check out the Kiwi Families website for heaps of cool ideas and craft activities.

You can find out about Matariki events in Wellington at the Matariki Wellington website.

 

Top 10 Non-Fiction for July

Lego dominates kid’s favourite  non-fiction books this month!

1.   Star Wars by David West Reynolds

2.   Ripley’s believe it or not! by Rosie Alexander

3.   Moshi Monsters by Steve Cleverley

4.   The LEGO movie  by Hannah Dolan

5.   Cool creations in 35 Pieces by Sean Kenney

6.   Moshipedia from Puffin

7.   Lego Star Wars by Simon Beecroft

8.   Guinness world records 2014 by Craig Glenday

9.   Pokemon ultimate handbook by Cris Silvestri

10. Matariki by Melanie Drewery

 


Matariki books

This week is Matariki -also known as Maori New Year. Want to find out more? Check out these marvelous Matariki books:

Daniel’s Matariki feast by Rebecca Beyer and Linley Wellington.

Daniel is a new boy at a school. His teacher Stacey introduces him to the other boys and they go and pick pumpkins from the school garden. Back inside the Teacher talks to the class about Matariki and the feast they are going to have if the pumpkins are ready.

The class talk to Daniel about Matariki and he goes home and talks about it with his family. His mother knew about Matariki as her Granny used to watch the sky for it. What happens next is really lovely.

 

 

Child of Aotearoa by Melanie Drewery, illustrated by Bruce Potter.

This is a very lovely story about the different Peoples coming to Aotearoa. It starts with the first Maori arriving and then goes on to other races arriving here.
People travelling through and settling here in Aotearoa. The sons and daughters of this land grow up and have children of their own and they grow up all Children of Aorearoa.

“The children grow and pass the line down to you. A line woven with many threads from other lands. Passed down through me to you — child of Aotearoa.”
This book has lovely pictures.

 

Matariki by Melanie Drewery

This is a story about a family who have a surprise visit from their Grandma. There is going to be a surprise happening for them and they have to wait and see. This is really exciting event happening the next day Matariki and the whole family are getting together for it. Matariki andthe special events are explained in this story.

Beautiful pictures and the book is available in both English and Te Reo.

 

The Treasure by Melanie Drewery illustrated by Bruce Potter.

This is the story of a mother telling her child about a beautiful teasure that she has. He has to try and guess it. Can you?

Beautiful pictures and a lovely story. We have it available in both English and Te Reo as Te Taonga.

Celebrate Matariki at Kilbirnie library!

Come along to these upcoming events at Kilbirnie library…

This Thursday 26th June at 3.30pm, the wonderful Kilbirnie School Kapa Haka Group is coming in to perform waiata for Matariki.

On Tuesday 1st July at 10.30am, Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Ngā Mokopuna will be presenting a Matariki play.

Come along and celebrate Matariki with us! And don’t forget you can listen to Te Huihui o Matariki read online (in English and Te Reo) on our Downloads page.

 

Matariki, Myths and Space Storytimes at Cummings Park Library

Matariki

Whakanuia Matariki, Whakanuia te Tau Hou Māori – Celebrate Matariki – Celebrate the Māori New Year!

Matariki starts this year on 28 June, but we are kicking off early with a special preschool storytime series all about Matariki, myths and outer space.

The series will run for four weeks at Cummings Park Library, Ngaio and starts on Wednesday the 11th of June at 10.30am.

Preschoolers are encouraged to bring along something creative they’ve made to do with Matariki, myths and outer space. It could be a star, a rocket ship, a woven kete, a taniwha, a Matariki kite or anything related to Ao Māori (Māori world) made with or without the help of parents and caregivers. All children who bring along art will receive a prize!

We would love to create a starry night sky out of the preschoolers’ art in the children’s area.