Moana Reo Maori: Moana in Te Reo Maori!

Can’t get enough of the movie, Moana! Well, brace yourselves a special edition of Moana, (Moana Reo Maori) returns to movie theatres… again, completely redubbed in Te Reo!

To celebrate Te Wiki o Te Reo – Maori Language Week (11th to 17th of September) there will be free screenings of the film, Moana in Te Reo Maori at cinemas in Wellington during the weekend of the 16th and 17th of September.

 

 

 

Check out screening times at:

The Embassy.

Reading Cinemas Courtenay.

The Roxy Cinemas.

A great event to bring the whole family to enjoy a Disney Classic and learn, or brush up on your Te Reo Māori.

Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori: Māori Language Week

arohatialogoKia ora tamariki! That means ‘hello kids’! This week in Aoteroa New Zealand we celebrate a very special event that doesn’t happen anywhere else in the world: Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori, Māori Language Week.

When English speakers began arriving in New Zealand over 200 years ago, Māori was the main language spoken, and many settlers had to learn te reo so that they could trade with the Māori people.

However, as more Pākehā (white skinned) came to our country and Māori people learned to speak in English, te reo was used less and less.

At school, Māori children were often encouraged to speak in English only, and some were even punished for speaking in their native tongue.

iStock_000008775653SmallBy the mid-late 1900s (about 50 years ago), very few New Zealanders were able to speak fluent te reo, and people became concerned that the Māori language was dying out.

As a result of this, te reo Māori was recognised as an official language of New Zealand in 1987, and Māori Language Week was started the same year to help promote the language and encourage the use of te reo Māori in everyday life.

Nowadays, te reo is a well known aspect of Māori culture and an important part of New Zealand’s history. It is taught in schools and kindergartens, and children can even go to special schools called Kura Kaupapa that only speak in te reo.

The use of Māori words in everyday life is also much more common, and you have probably seen signs in te reo around your local community, at the library and at school.

iStock_000018236895SmallBut even though we have made some really great improvements over the last 30 years, we still have a long way to go. You can do your bit by using te reo this week.

Here is a useful phrase to get you started:

Q. ‘Kei te pehea koe?’ (How are you?)

A. ‘Kei te pai!’ (I am good) ……….Or you might also be ‘harikoa’ (happy), ‘pouri’ (sad) or ‘hemokai’ (hungry).

Check out our Māori language books on the library catalogue!

 

Whakanuia te Wiki o Te Reo Māori!

A5 Flyer MAORI frontCelebrate Māori Langauge Week!

Haere mai ki te Whare Hapori o Paparangi mō ngā pūrākau, ngā waiata, ngā rotarota hoki i te reo Māori

He pai rawa mō ngā tamariki nohinohi me ō rātou whānau, nau mai, haere mai ki a koutou katoa

 

Kei Whea: Newlands Community Centre, 9 Batchelor St, Newlands

Āhea: Te Rāpare 24 Hōngongoi, 2.00 – 2.30 i te ahiahi

 

 

 

Come to Newlands Community Centre for stories and songs in the Māori language

Great for preschoolers and their families, everyone welcome

 

Where: Newlands Community Centre, 9 Batchelor St, Newlands

When: Thursday 24 July, 2.00-2.30 pm

 

 

Te Wiki o te Reo (Māori Language Week)

Kia ora!

Whakanuia Te Wiki o te Reo Māori 2009 (Celebrate Māori Language Week 2009)

 

Storyteller Moira Wairama will be performing a Te Reo storytelling session:

 

Where: Whare pukapuka matua (Central Library)

When: Te Rāhoroi 1 Here-turi-kōkā i te tau 2009 (Saturday 1st August 2009)

Time: 11.45am – 12.15 pm

Cost: Free! No bookings required.

 

Moira’s storytelling is tumeke (awesome)!