Kids’ Club Review by Anna: The forgetful knight

The forgetful knightThe forgetful knight, by Michelle Robinson and Fred Blunt

This book is about a knight who forgets everything. He goes to fight a dragon to save his horse. I thought this book was okay but not amazing. It was easy to read and had great illustrations.

4 stars

Reviewed by Anna from Karori and Karori Normal School , 9 years old

Kids’ Club Review by Molly Morgan: The forgetful knight

The forgetful knightThe forgetful knight, by Michelle Robinson and Fred Blunt

This book is about a forgetful knight who is on a mission to rescue his horse, Sir Clopalot. I thought this was a nice children’s storybook with pleasant illustrations. I would recommend this book to young children.

3 stars

Reviewed by Molly Morgan from Karori and Karori Normal School , 11 years old

Kids’ Club Review by Macy: The forgetful knight

The forgetful knightThe forgetful knight, by Michelle Robinson and Fred Blunt

The Forgetful Knight, By Michelle Robinson and Fred Blunt, is an interesting book. I would recommend it for boys, although girls can read it, because it is still enjoyable. Any age can read this book, but especially little kids. The book is about a knight that thinks his best friend has been eaten by a dragon, and tries to fight the dragon. Although it had been eaten by the dragon, it was still alive. The best friend got out of the dragons stomach, as the knight squeezed the dragon. So now the best friend is saved, everyone will live happily ever after. I would suggest this book to others because it is funny to see the knight being forgetful, and it is an easy read. I wanted to keep on reading because the author made us keep guessing what was going to happen next. The book taught me not to come to hasty conclusions, without knowing the situation. I felt nervous when reading it, because I thought the best friend was actually not alive anymore. Overall, this book was an enjoyable, and quick read, and I really looked forward to finding out what would happen next.

By Macy – (7)

5 stars

Reviewed by Macy from Khandallah and Khandallah School , 7 years old

Great new kids fiction for the new school year!

Image courtesy of SyndeticsCrowns and Codebreakers by Elen Caldecott (The Marsh Road Mysteries #2)

Minnie’s Gran picks up the wrong suitcase at the airport. Then Minnie’s house is burgled and the only thing taken is the suitcase. The suitcase was full of boy’s clothes. Who was the boy? What has happened to him? Minnie knows there is a mystery to be solved here and reassembles her gang to solve it.

 

Stop Those Monsters! by Steve ColeImage courtesy of Syndetics

The Wizard of Oz meets Monsters Inc in this MONSTROUSLY funny stand-alone story from bestselling author phenomenon, Steve Cole. I’m Bob, a human boy stuck in a land of MONSTERS. I’m trying to get out with the help of three – count them, three – incredible creatures. There’s Verity, who looks like a giant hamster. Alfie, who’s about as scary as a bag of crisps. And Zola, a gorgon who can’t turn people to stone (though she can manage cardboard at a push). We’re on a crazy, death-defying quest to escape with our lives. And all around us, the cry goes up: STOP THOSE MONSTERS!!!

 

Image courtesy of SyndeticsA Horse Called Dora ; Knight in Training #2 (by Vivian French and David Melling

Sam J. Butterbiggins’ only ambition is to be a Very Noble Knight, but he has a problem he’s been packed off to the castle next door to stay with his aunt, uncle and annoying cousin Prune while his parents are away. But Sam’s discovered an ancient scroll listing the six quests to be completed in order to become a knight, and he’s already completed the first one! Now he’s found his True Companion (Prune), next on the list is to track down a Snow White Steed. But when Aunt Egg orders Sam and Prune to journey to Weasel’s Hill to deliver Horace the warthog back to his owner, it looks like the young knight-in-training looks will have to put his quest on hold. Or will he?

 

Under Suspicion by R.A. SprattImage courtesy of Syndetics

Since Friday Barnes was arrested after cracking the case of Highcrest academy’s swamp-yeti, she is not so sure boarding school was the smartest choice! And there’s a new boy at school who’s take a shine to her to deal with. Can Friday navigate the school grounds and decipher a decades-old mystery without getting caught in an unexpected love triangle?

 

Image courtesy of SyndeticsNancy Drew; The Secret of Shadow Ranch by Carolyn Keene

‘Nancy Drew arrives in Phoenix, Arizona, eagerly looking forward to a fun-filled vacation at Shadow Ranch, but abruptly finds herself involved in a baffling mystery.  The ranch is being haunted by a phantom horse and maliciously damaged by an unknown enemy.  Local people believe that the ghostly animal is carrying out the curse of Dirk Valentine, the romantic outlaw who was killed many years ago at Shadow Ranch, where he had gone to fulfill a promise to his sweetheart’…. –taken from inside book cover.

 

 

New Non Fiction: Folk Tales, Great Warriors and Monkeys making chocolate.

The Barefoot Book of Jewish tales.

This is a fantastic addition to the library’s collection. This collection includes eight delightful tales from the Jewish tradition. Each story has been chosen for its appeal to families and each has a simple yet powerful, message.  Written by Rabbi Shoshana Boyd Gelfand, herself a mother of three, this is a fantastic set of stories to share and to treasure. Includes two story CDs narrated by Debra Messing. Great for ages 7 years and over.

 

 

 

 

The Life Cycle of a cat.

This is a great picture book for young children that gives a fascinating introduction to how tiny new born kittens (there’s even a pictures of new born kittens) turn into fully grown cats. You will also discover how they use play to learn and how the mother cat teaches them to hunt.

 

 

 

 

 

Project History.

  

Ever wanted to learn more about Greek and Roman history? Interested in crafts and activities related to these subjects? Check out The Greeks andThe Romans. These books allows you to discover the world of Greek and Roman history through an exciting combination of information and step by step activities. Fun activities in the book about The Greeks include making a Greek Theater Mask, an abacus and a model of the Parthenon, while activities featured in The Romans include making a laurel wreath, a model chariot and collages of gods and goddesses. Great source of entertainment over the school holidays or on a wet day.

 

 

 

 

No Monkeys, No Chocolate.

Sounds like the sort of book to make your mouth water? When you think of chocolate, you might think of a chocolate bar, a birthday cake, or a glass of chocolate milk. But where does chocolate come from? This book tells about the cocoa bean, which grows in the tropical rain forests and how the animals and other living things play an important part, even the monkeys. This book will change the way you think about chocolate… forever.

DID YOU KNOW: About thirty to forty cocoa beans (inside a cocoa pod) is just enough to make one chocolate bar.

 

 

Breaking the spell : Stories of magic and mystery from Scotland.

Ready for excitement and adventure? Ready to meet witches, kelpies, fairies, selkies, brave warriors and courageous girls?

Forget the traditional  fairy tales and Greek mythology! Celtic Folk Tales are in!

This book is a wonderful treasure that holds a collection of ten magical and funny stories from Scotland, complete with fantastic illustrations that tells stories about an underwater monster that can turn itself into a white horse, a girl whose mother is half seal, half human and a boy who is turned into a fairy but saved by a brave heroine that will leave you spellbound!

Also check out An Illustrated Treasury of Scottish Folk and Fairy Tales and Spellbound: Tales of Enchantment from Ancient Ireland if you are in the mood for some more Celtic Folk Tales.

 

Greatest Warriors.

Ready to meet and find out all about the most impressive fighters in history? Check out these books in the Greatest Warriors series: Roman Soldiers, Knights and Vikings and find out all there is to know about the armour, weapons and fighting styles contained in these three amazing books. The illustrations/photographs are amazing and really portray  dramatic recreations of historical events.

Epic mysteries are fun!!!

Have you ever been wandering around an old castle or a crumbling mansion? Did you hear the stories of the past told by  its ruins or its demolished walls? Did anything odd happen to you that you felt you were going on an adventure?

If so, here is a bunch of medieval-royal-epic mysteries you might enjoy… !

The water Castle, by Megan Frazer Blakemore

Ephraim Appledore-Smith is an ordinary boy living an ordinary life. But all that changes when his father suffers a stroke, and his family moves to the Water Castle – their ancestral home in the small town of Crystal Springs, Maine.

Mallory Green’s ancestors have always been the caretakers of the Water Castle – and the guardians of its magic. She’s been raised to protect the legend of the Fountain of Youth, rumored to exist on the grounds. But ever since her mom left, she’s stopped believing in magic.

When Ephraim learns of the fountain, he’s sure finding it can cure his dad. With Mallory and Will’s help, Ephraim embarks on a mission that brings them deep into their families’ shared history, through every mysterious room in the Water Castle, and on a quest that will blur the lines between magic and science, creativity and discovery, leaving you to wonder: DO YOU BELIEVE IN THE UNBELIEVABLE???

8 and +

Story’s end, by Marissa Burt

Long ago, a King ruled the land of Story… During his reign, Heroes, Villains and characters of all kinds lived out tales filled with daring quests and epic struggles.

Then the king disappeared, and over the years, nearly everyone forgot that he had ever existed. Now an evil Enemy has emerged, determined to write a new future for Story that he will control. And an ordinary girl named Una Fairchild is inextricably tangles up in his deadly plan…

9 and +

 

Thrice upon a Marigold, by Jean Ferris

Once… Twice… Thrice the fun!

There’s always trouble on the way to happily-ever-after in Zandelphia-Beaurivage, but don’t tell King Christian and Queen Marigold. They’ve just welcomed little Princess Poppy to the royal family. Life at the palace seems happier than ever- until the princess is kidnapped by the kingdom’s ex-torturer-in-chief and ex-poisoner-in-chief as an act of revenge!

Rescuing the princess from the bad guys won’t be easy- it might take the king, the queen, the royal guards, a librarian, a blacksmith, a retired wizard, a white elephant, and a fire-breathing dragon! Can this royal kidnapping caper finally end in a happily-ever-after for all?

8 and +

 

 

New Non-Fiction to inspire you

The Hugo movie Companion

Hugo was an amazing film that came out in 2011 that won five Oscars. It was based on a book called The Invention of Hugo Cabret, by Brian Selznick. This brilliant book shows how you take an incredible book and make it into award winning film. This book is more in depth than your average movie guide. It includes not only interviews with the director and main cast members but also the costume, hair and set designers, as well as the cinematographer and the camera operators. So not only is it a great guide to a brilliant film, it’s also an excellent insight into the film making process.

 

 

 

 

Toy Story: the art and making of  the animated film

This is another great book that takes a close look at the making of a movie, Toy Story. It was groundbreaking back when it was released (1995!) and this book takes you through how a CGI movie is conceived and then animated. There’s lots of cool concept art to look through, and you can see how the story and the character designs changed over time.  It’s a must-read for Pixar fans.

 

 

 

 

 

Star Wars Clone Wars: the visual guide to the ultimate battles

If you loved the Star Wars animated series, you’ll love this book. It discusses all the major battles in the series so far, as well as having some extra information on the characters themselves.  It doesn’t go into the making of the series, but for information about the story it can’t be beaten.

 

 

 

 

 

Knights and Castles

Although this book is aimed at young readers, it contains some useful information about what life is like for a medieval knight and how he tried to live his life. It’s interesting, but takes a bit of an optimistic view of knights. If you’re a bit older you might want to look at Terry Deary’s Horrible History book.

 

 

 

 

Rescuing Gus

Melissa Wareham always wanted a dog. So when she grew up she started working at Battersea Dogs Home, the oldest and most famous dog shelter in England.  There she meets “Gus” a part husky mongrel who’s had a bit of a rough start in life. So she adopts him, and tries to make sure he has the best life possible. Hard when he gets into a lot of trouble! This is a great book for those who are thinking about adopting pets.

 

 

 

 

 

Martha Stewart’s Favourite crafts for kids

This is a great little book that will teach you how to make 175 cool projects; everything from Terrariums to gingerbread houses.  The instructions are clear, and there’s a picture of everything you need to make the project, so everything’s easy to make.  We’ve recently gotten a whole heap of craft books: Art Lab is a cute book for preschoolers, Crafts for accessorising that look for  the fashionistas, and another ‘bumper’ book of crafty activities, 100 fantastic things to make, do, and play.