Kids’ Club Review by Tiger: Sophie Quire and the last Storyguard

Sophie Quire and the last Storyguard, by Jonathan Auxier

Wow! This book was a real gripper, it made me scared and happy and I almost fell off my bed! (Okay, people don’t normally say that but the saying goes “I was hanging onto my chair,” or falling off it, but I wasn’t sitting on a chair, I was reading in bed.)

Sophie loves loves LOVES books. (like me! EXACTLY LIKE ME!) To the point that it makes her dangerous (apparently). Her father owns a bookshop. She has no idea what happened to her mother as her father refuses to talk about her. So.

Peter Nimble is a cunning and very good thief. He has been so for most of his life. He can pickpocket any pocket and rob any house. He doesn’t have a mother or father either. (More can be found about him in the book Peter Nimble and his Fantastic Eyes). So.

Evil Inquisitor Prigg is trying to get rid of ALL storybooks, starting up a “No Nonsense” campaign. Sophie and her dad are in trouble. So.

Peter and Sophie quickly meet and become not friends, but not enemies either. They are sent on a quest to find four books – the Book of Who, What, Where and Why. (I think that’s right, anyway). It is a dangerous journey, especially since Sophie’s mum (as she finds out EVENTUALLY from her irritatingly quiet dad) was murdered by someone desperate to get to the Book of Who.

Sophie and Peter (and Sir Tode, a kind of horse cat) have to save the world before the world is destroyed forever, (NO BOOKS! NO BOOKS! NOOOOOOO BOOOOOKS!!)

Read this thrilling and heartstopping book to find out more!

5 stars

Reviewed by Tiger from Cummings Park and , 11 years old

Kids’ Club Review by Caleb: Artemis Fowl and the Atlantis complex

Artemis Fowl and the Atlantis complexArtemis Fowl and the Atlantis complex, by Eoin Colfer

The atlantis complex is a great book, and my favourite in the Artemis Fowl series! Artemis Fowl has now got the atlantis complex – this is a psychosis common among gulit – ridden criminals and includes symptoms of obssessive behaviour, paranoia, delusions and in extreme cases multiple personality disorder. Causing Atemis to become nice instead of the evil mastermind he ususally is.

This means he can’t fight the robots attacking atlantis. It is an extreamly tense and funny book. I recommend it for 9+ because it can be confusing at times. This is no. 7 in the series, but you can read it out of order.

5 stars

Reviewed by Caleb from Cummings Park and , 10 years old

Kids’ Club Review by Peehoo: Sugar and spice

Sugar and spiceSugar and spice, by Sarah Mlynowski

This book is all kinds of Awesome! When Jonah and Abby land in the tale of Hansel and Gretel that can’t help eat the candy house. After all their parents did make them miss out dessert! But when the witch takes them in prison they are in SERIOUS TROUBLE!

5 stars

Reviewed by Peehoo from Johnsonville and , 11 years old

Kids’ Club Review by Peehoo: Cold as ice

Cold as iceCold as ice, by Sarah Mlynowski

When the mirror sucks Abby and Jonah in to the tale of the Snow Queen New friendship begins. When the Snow Queen turns everyone into a Frombie- A frozen zombie. It’s up to Abby and the Bandit girl Sharon to save the day! Then they realise all the Snow Queen wanted was a true friend.

5 stars

Reviewed by Peehoo from Johnsonville and , 11 years old

Top Ten Children’s Comics March 2017

 

So… library borrowers are big fans of Snoopy and Charlie Brown!

Did you know that there is a museum dedicated to Charles M. Schulz the Charlie Brown creator!  Snoopy was based on his childhood pet dog Spike. At the museum there is a mural showing the way Spike became the Snoopy character we all recognise today.

What would a comic character of your pet look like?  Let us know in the comments below =)

  1. Pokémon, by Hidenori Kusaka
  2. Peanuts, by Charles M. Schulz
  3. Big Nate, by Lincoln Peirce
  4. Tintin, by Hergé
  5. Asterix, by Goscinny and Udzero
  6. Garfield, by Jim Davis
  7. Adventure time, by Ryan North
  8. Amulet, by Kazu Kibuishi
  9. The Smurfs anthology, by Peyo
  10. Chi’s Sweet Home, by Kanata Konami

Beauty and the Beast overload in the library!

This is a blog post that pays tribute to popular fairy tale, Beauty and The Beast. Beauty and the Beast  is a traditional fairy tale written by French novelist Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve and published in 1740 in La Jeune Américaine et les contes marins (The Young American and Marine Tales).

The story that a young woman named Beauty, who offers herself in exchange for her father, who has been imprisoned by the Beast, after stealing a rose from the beast’s garden, which was intended for Beauty as a gift. She discovers that her captor is an enchanted prince in disguise, who must find true love, despite his ugliness, to revert back to his former self. The question is can Beauty look beyond the beast’s ugly exterior and find true beauty within his heart?

Check out other versions and retellings of this classic fairy tale that the library holds:

image courtesy of syndeticsBeauty and the Beast, illustrated by Dan Taylor.

Beauty and the Beast is a perfect introduction to this classic fairytale. Push, pull, and turn mechanisms bring the story to life and introduce all the main characters: Beauty, her father, and of course the Beast! This well-loved fairytale is beautifully imagined for a new generation by children’s illustrator Dan Taylor.

 

image courtesy of syndeticsBeauty and the beast / retold by Michael Morpurgo ; illustrated by Loretta Schauer.

A captivating retelling of the nation’s favourite fairy tale, from the nation’s favourite storyteller, Michael Morpurgo. After encountering a fearsome beast at a mysterious palace, down-on-his-luck merchant Marco is forced to make a promise in exchange for his life: he must persuade one of his three daughters to return to the palace in his place – but she must come of her own free will. Beautiful, kind-hearted Belle agrees at once to return to the palace, and there she and the Beast exist companionably, with the Beast asking of Belle the same question at the end of each day: “Dearest Belle, will you marry me?” After a return home to consult with her father, Belle resolves to follow her heart and return to the Beast, but her plans are thwarted by the trickery of her jealous sisters. When, at last, Belle is able to find her way back to the palace, she finds her beloved Beast lying as still as death on the ground. As Belle’s tears fall on his face, the Beast is transformed into a handsome prince the ancient spell upon him broken by Belle’s tears of true love.

image courtesy of syndeticsBeauty and the Beast / by Melissa Lagonegro ; illustrated by the Disney Storybook Art Team.

Belle is trapped in a castle, under a terrible curse. Can she break the spell?

image courtesy of syndeticsBeauty and the beast / [retold by] Berlie Doherty ; illustrated by Jane Ray.

image courtesy of syndeticsBeauty and the beast / Ursula Jones ; Sarah Gibb.

image courtesy of syndeticsBeauty and the beast  retold by Max Eilenberg ; illustrated by Angela Barrett.

image courtesy of syndeticsBeauty and the beast by Geraldine McCaughrean ; illustrated by Gary Blythe.

 

 

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsThe Fairytale Hairdresser and Beauty and the Beast by Abie Longstaff & Lauren Beard.

image courtesy of syndeticsThe beast within : a tale of beauty‘s prince  by Serena Valentino.

Presents an adaptation of the classic Beauty and the Beast fairy tale from the perspective of the cursed prince who is transformed from a beloved and jovial ruler into a reclusive and bitter monster in search of true love.

Love to watch stories? Now we have Walt Disney’s Animated classic of Beauty and the Beast available on DVD at your local library!

image courtest of amazon.comWalt Disney’s Beauty and the Beast.

A Walt Disney movie about a tough no nonsense heroine, named Belle (French word for Beauty), who offers herself in exchange for her father, who has been imprisoned by the Beast, and discovers that her captor is an enchanted prince in disguise. While the situation is anything than ideal, this Beauty and the Beast must learn, in a very Pride and Prejudice-like way to overcome their pride and stubbornness, in the hopes of falling in love and breaking the beast’s enchantment. This film is beautifully constructed and made! Filled with lots of quirky characters, in the form of Lumiere (a candle stick), Cogsworth (a cynical clock), Mrs Potts (a mother-hen teapot) and many musical numbers. A film that the entire family can enjoy – especially on a Saturday night!

 

image courtesy of amazon.comMovie Review: Beauty and the Beast.

Belle (Emma Watson), a bright, beautiful and independent young woman, is taken prisoner by a beast (Dan Stevens) in his castle. Despite her fears, she befriends the castle’s enchanted staff and learns to look beyond the beast’s hideous exterior, recognising the kind heart and soul of the true prince that hides on the inside.

This film is beautifully constructed and made! Overall it was an interesting revamp of the original animated 1992 classic. Filled with the same musical numbers and dance sequences, there a few twists, turns and few surprises during the film. Sorry, no spoilers in this review. The ballroom scene where Belle and the beast are dancing is fantastic. Belle’s dress and the dance moves – WOW, could possibly put the previous Disney Princess, Cinderella to shame!

All the characters had a part to play, had more depth, personality and beautifully showcased their uniqueness on screen. Even actor, Luke Evans did a very good job at playing arrogant, vain and sadistic baddie, Gaston, who foolishly hopes to win Belle’s hand, who in turn politely, but firmly rejects him! He didn’t have a bad singing voice either.

The characters:  Lumiere, Cogsworth and Mrs Potts were wonderful and entertaining. I particularly loved Lumiere’s number “Be Our Guest”, beautifully sung by Ewen McGregor.

Dan Stevens is phenomenal (and perhaps a tad bad tempered) as the beast. I always cracked up over his dry sense of humour. Overall he did the character of the beast justice to its original predecessor. I found there was more depth to the characters: Belle and the beast, and perhaps more of a back story as to how their background, experiences and personalities shaped the people that they came to be. I think in a sense these two are portrayed as mirror images of each other and have great, not to mention a unique chemistry.

I think Emma Watson plays Belle as more lady-like in this film. Not as openly stubborn and strong willed as the original Belle, but more quietly assertive and determined. Not to mention she is very polite in standing up to the beast and Gaston.

As always, the story encourages viewers to look beyond the superficial and to be compassionate, curious, humble, and generous. This movie is a must see and has been worth the long wait. A film that the entire family can enjoy on a night out on the town– especially on a Saturday night! 9/10 all the way!

Also check out the trailer and some musical numbers from the film.