Kids’ Club Review by Leela: What makes me me?

What makes me me?What makes me me?, by Robert M. L. Winston

Through games and activities this book helps children learn about themselves. It has lots of questions about how life works and questions about what you like doing which tell you about how you think and your personality. I really enjoyed it.

4 stars

Reviewed by Leela from Karori and , 5 years old

Kids’ Club Review by Tanushree: Dolphins

DolphinsDolphins, by Rebecca Baines

From this book I learnt lots about dolphins. I was very surprised when I found out when dolphins are 6 years old they are adults!!!!

5 stars

Reviewed by Tanushree from Johnsonville and , 6 years old

Discover your green thumb and get into gardening this summer!

Gardening is a fun activity to get involved in during the summer months, and one that many people all around the world find very fulfilling.

Gardening is also really good for you in all sorts of ways. Firstly, gardening outside is a great way to get out in the sun and soak up some vitamin D, just don’t forget to be sun smart and chuck on a sunhat and sunscreen before you head outside.

Gardening is  good exercise and an enjoyable way to keep busy and stay active in the summer months. It is also a fun introduction to science and enables us to learn about the natural world around us using all of our senses (sight, smell, taste, touch, sound).

But best of all, gardening makes you happy! In fact, scientific experiments have shown that when you connect with soil, your brain releases a feel-good chemical called serotonin that actually helps to improve your mood. How cool is that!?

Gardening is also a very rewarding activity, as you get to watch all of your hard work grow and flourish (and it might even end up on the dinner table).

Gardening can be a peaceful activity to do on your own, but you can have fun gardening with a friend or family member, or even in a group. You might know someone that likes gardening, perhaps your Grandparent or a neighbour, that you could help out their garden.

If you have limited outdoor space at your house, try starting small using a planter box, an old car tyre, or plant straight into a bag of compost.

The libraries have HEAPS of awesome books on gardening to inspire you and help you get started. Check out the catalogue to find out what’s available in your local branch library and don’t forget children can place reserves for free using your library card all summer long!

What’s your favourite children’s toy?

Everyone loves toys – yes even adults love them. I bet a lot of mums and dads out there have a special toy from their childhood tucked away in the cupboard somewhere.

If you had to pick a favourite toy, what would it be? Do you love lego, or Star Wars toys. Maybe you are a Barbie or a My Little Pony fan. Perhaps you have a drone that you fly around or do you prefer to ride on your bike or scooter.

Whatever it is you might like to learn some funny and interesting facts about toys.

Did you know that:

  • The word “toy” comes from an Old English word meaning “tool”.
  • Dolls are considered to be the oldest toys in history.
  • The Yo-yo is believed to be the second-oldest toy in the world. It was used in 500BC in Ancient Greece.
  • Barbie was introduced in 1959 and cost $3. Every second, two Barbie dolls are sold in the world.
  • The first toy advertised on television was Mr. Potato Head.
  • Play-Doh was originally used to clean wallpaper.
  • Kermit the Frog is left-handed.

And last but not least did you know that LEGO is the world’s No. 1 tyre manufacturer. It produces 318 million tyres every year. That is 870,000 tiny tyres in a day. Wow that’s amazing!

There are heaps of cool books in the library about the history of toys as well as books that teach how to build and construct them.

So have some toy fun!

 

 

 

                    

 

Top 10 Children’s Non-Fiction September 2016

Harry Potter in the Non-Fiction section? What’s going on?

As the new Harry Potter book came out in the format of a play, or script, it can be found with other theatrical greats in the literature section where the other plays hang out.  The play version of The Witches by Roald Dahl hangs out there along with Shakespeare!

 

1. Minecraft, by Stephanie Milton

2. LEGO, by Daniel Lipkowitz

3. Minecraft, by Megan Miller

4. Star Wars, by David West Reynolds

5. Minecraft, by Nick Farwell

6. Harry Potter and the cursed child, by Jack Thorne, J. K. Rowling and John Tiffany

7. Star Wars character encyclopedia, by Simon Beecroft

8. Minecraft, by Matthew Needler and Phil Southam

9. Small scenes from a big galaxy, by Vesa Lehtimaki

10. How Maui found his father and the magic jawbone, by Peter Gossage

Daylight savings is on the horizon…..

Get ready for longer evenings and family BBQs because daylight savings is just around the corner!

Daylight saving, also called ‘summer time’ in some countries, is when we change the clocks by an hour in order to shorten or lengthen the amount of sunlight in the evenings. With summer approaching, we will be turning clocks forward so that we have an extra hour of light before the sun sets at night. Sometimes we refer to this as “springing forward” because we are currently in the Spring season. In Autumn, we “fall back” and turn the clocks back an hour so that it is dark earlier in the evenings over Winter.

The idea of daylight savings was thought up in 1895 by a New Zealander called George Hudson, although many ancient people were flexible in changing the times of their days to suit the sun and seasons.

Hudson studied entomology (insects) and astronomy (space), and wanted more leisure time in the evenings to collect insects. He presented a paper to the Wellington Philosophical Society after lots of people became interested in his idea, and the Summer-Time Act was passed in 1927 (nearly 100 years ago).

Daylight savings is practiced in lots of countries all around the world. Many people find that longer evenings allow more time for activities like sports and socialising, however it can be troublesome for some professions such as farming in which workers start their days early. Another benefit of daylight savings is that we can save on energy, as we don’t need to turn our lights on as early in the evening.

In New Zealand, daylight savings happens overnight on the last Sunday of September, which will be the 25th this year. How are you going to spend your extra time?

Check out the library catalogue for inspiration on fun outdoor activities and to learn more about seasons!