Singing performance and workshop with the Manawa Ora Children Community Choir

How exciting! A children’s choir will be doing a performance and singing workshop in the central Library, and you can come along!

The Manawa Ora Children Community Choir is a group of young singers who comes together each week to learn music from around the world. In this choir, children are accepted, celebrated and empowered, as they learn to sing in parts and in different languages. They then share their love of music with others by singing at rest homes and community events, and for the first time they will be singing in the library!

Come along and join in for a free interactive performance and workshop!  Children, parents, and grandparents are all welcome. Bookings aren’t required.

 

Saturday 23rd June, 2 – 3 PM,

Wellington Central Library, Ground Floor. at the Wellington Central Library.

 

Finalists, finally!

It’s always tough waiting for this one every year. Luckily you can munch on FREE Hell Pizza while you wait.

But.. the wait is over! Today the finalists for the NZ Children’s and Young Adult Book Awards have been announced. These are the best books written or illustrated by New Zealanders in the last year:

 

Picture Book:

Granny McFlitter the Champion Knitter, written by Heather Haylock and illustrated by Lael Chisholm

 

 

 

 

I am Jellyfish, written and illustrated by Ruth Paul

 

 

 

 

 

That’s Not the Monster We Ordered, written by Richard Fairgray and Terry Jones, and illustrated by Richard Fairgray

 

 

 

 

The Gift Horse, written by Sophie Siers and illustrated by Katharine White

 

 

 

 

The Longest Breakfast, written by Jenny Bornholdt and illustrated by Sarah Wilkins

 

 

 

 

 

Junior Fiction:

How Not to Stop a Kidnap Plot, written by Suzanne Main

 

 

 

 

 

How to Bee, written by Bren MacDibble

 

 

 

 

 

Lyla: Through My Eyes – Natural Disaster Zones, written by Fleur Beale (Also available as an eBook)

 

 

 

 

Dawn Raid, written by Pauline (Vaeluaga) Smith

 

 

 

 

 

The Thunderbolt Pony, written by Stacy Gregg (Also available as a Digital Audiobook)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Junior Non-Fiction:

Aotearoa: The New Zealand Story, written by Gavin Bishop

 

 

 

 

 

Explore! Aotearoa, written by Bronwen Wall and illustrated by Kimberly Andrews

 

 

 

 

New Zealand’s Great White Sharks, written by Alison Balance

 

 

 

 

 

Sky High: Jean Batten’s Incredible Flying Adventures, written by David Hill and illustrated by Phoebe Morris

 

 

 

 

The New Zealand Wars, Written by Philippa Werry

 

 

 

 

 

 

Illustration:

Abel Tasman: Mapping the Southern Lands, illustrated by Marco Ivančić

 

 

 

 

Bobby, the Littlest War Hero, illustrated by Jenny Cooper

 

 

 

 

 

Giants, Trolls, Witches, Beasts, illustrated and written by Craig Phillips (also available as a eBook)

 

 

 

 

I am Jellyfish, written and illustrated by Ruth Paul

 

 

 

 

 

 

Te Reo Māori:

Tu Meke Tūī! Written by Malcolm Clarke, translated by Evelyn Tobin and illustrated by Hayley King (Also available in English)

 

 

 

 

Hineahuone, written and illustrated by Xoë Hall and translated by Sian Montgomery-Neutze

Te Tamaiti me te Aihe, written and illustrated by Robyn Kahukiwa and translated by Kiwa Hammond

 

 

Check out the YA (and other) categories.

 

The winners will be announced on August 8th. Stay tuned…

International Simultaneous Storytime 2018

For the first time ever New Zealand is joining with Australia for an international storytime. Hickory Dickory Dash by Tony Wilson will be read simultaneously -at the same time- across both countries.

You can join us and take part at Wellington Central, Johnsonville, or Mervyn Kemp (Tawa) Libraries at 12.30pm on Wednesday 18th May.

At Wellington Central and Johnsonville Library events there will be a live video feed to libraries in Canberra in Australia -Cool! You will have the chance to wave and giggle with children in Canberra and ask them lots of questions. At 1pm Hickory Dickory Dash will be read aloud by a special guest reader, with the children in Canberra listening too.

Don’t miss out on this exciting historic event. All are welcome, bookings aren’t required.

Mahi Moa ScavengAR Hunt!

The school holidays are underway and we are having such fun at Wellington City Libraries thinking up wonderful things for you to do. So we got together with ScimatAR who have a created an awesome Augmented Reality ScavengAR Hunt for you to do! Ever wanted to see a Moa walk through a library? Now you can! Come and meet Mahi the Moa and roam our non-fiction section solving puzzles and seeing things that others can’t. All you need is an android device (phone or tablet), whoops haven’t got one? Well come along and we will find you one to do the ScavengAR Hunt with.

Augmented reality layers a computer generated reality on top of the real world – in this case, a range of interactive activities that will come to life around you. Keen for an interactive and unique experience? Come on down to your local branch library to give the ScavengAR Hunt a go. Not in Wellington but up on the Kāpiti Coast? Guess what, Kāpiti libraries have the ScavengAR Hunt as well!

Where: Wellington City and Kāpiti Libraries

When: 9th to 14th October

When: All day just turn up

Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori Competition

Kia ora everyone! To Celebrate Māori Language week at Wellington City Libraries we are having a competition to name our Kōhunga Kōrero Puppets!

Tuī and Pūngāwerewere desperately need names and we think that you are the best people to name them. We would love you to come up with some great names. So when you’re in your local library this week getting some books to read, come up to the counter and we’ll write down your suggestions, along with your name and a contact number and put you in the draw to win prizes! The competition close this Rātapu (Sunday) the 17th of  Mahuru (September)so be quick and next week we’ll let you know who the lucky winners are. Ka kite anō!

Rise of the Robots: Doing it Gangham Style!

Wellington City Libraries are embracing the following trends: technology, coding and robots. To support the Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math (STEAM) learning platform, we now have two new team members to assist library staff in this process in the form of Nao Robot twins: Blue and Red.

Blue and Red are fully automated Nao, (pronounced ‘now’) humanoid Robots. They are 58cm tall, autonomous, and fully programmable. They walk, talk, listen to you, and even recognise your face. Blue and Red can even whip out a few dance moves to Thriller by Michael Jackson, Gangnam style by PSY and more! Like most humans, if the robots fall down they manage to get themselves back up again, along with a few grunts and groans, and touch wood without any broken limbs or bones.

The robots made their official debut at Wellington Central Library on Monday 10th of July, at the ‘Meet the Robots’ event, part of the Beyond the Page literary festival for children during the school holidays. Apart from a few technical difficulties and performance anxiety issues, for both the librarians’ and robots the event proved to be a success. Blue and Red were the main attractions and stole the show. Parents and kids were whipping out their cell phones to photograph and film the robots paparazzi style! Everyone was mightily impressed with what the robots could do. They loved the performances and there were a lot of ‘ooohs’, ‘aaahs’ and giggling, and a huge round of applause at the end! Overall Blue and Red are a welcome addition to the library, as well as an ideal learning platform for teaching STEAM subjects. With the robots on our team, Wellington City Libraries can continue to work alongside organisations, such as schools, businesses and Information Technology Institutes.  Together we’ll ensure the STEAM platform is promoted and taught to the wider community – Gangnam style!

Roald Dahl Day on 13th September!

image courtesy of syndeticsRoald Dahl Day strikes again on September 13th, marking 101 years since his birth! So let’s celebrate!image courtesy of syndetics

How to celebrate?

  • Read about his remarkable life. Read Boy, that presents  humorous anecdotes from the author’s childhood which includes summer vacations in Norway and an English boarding school, and Going Solo, that tells the story of his adventures as an adult, first in Africa, then learning to be a wartime fighter pilot and discover what led him to becoming the world famous author that he is known as today.
  • Visit the Roald Dahl website, where you will find  information about Roald Dahl as well as activities, games and quizzes.
  • Check out the blog post on 11 ways to celebrate Roald Dahl Day. Ideas include spotting a Roald Dahl character in LEGO and uncovering a Roald Dahl emoji.
  • Download your Roald Dahl Day 2017 party pack, whether you’re celebrating at the library, at home, in school or out and about.
  • Get crafty and whip up a delicious feast inspired from Roald Dahl’s novel. For more ideas, click here.
  • From 7th September, Roald’s last story, Billy and the Minpins, will be available in a brand new edition, illustrated for the last time by Quentin Blake.
  • Read and relive your favourite Roald Dahl stories. Wellington City Libraries holds a huge array of Roald Dahl books, including The BFG, Matilda, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, and movies for your reading pleasure. Also check out this previous blog post for ideas on what are great  Roald Dahl movies to watch.image courtesy of syndetics

New Roald Dahl books just added to the library collection include: Rhyme Stew, a series of plays adapted from Dahl’s popular stories which include The Twits, The BFG and James and the Giant and much more!

 

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsimage courtesy of syndetics

image courtesy of syndetics

image courtesy of syndetics

Moana Reo Maori: Moana in Te Reo Maori!

Can’t get enough of the movie, Moana! Well, brace yourselves a special edition of Moana, (Moana Reo Maori) returns to movie theatres… again, completely redubbed in Te Reo!

To celebrate Te Wiki o Te Reo – Maori Language Week (11th to 17th of September) there will be free screenings of the film, Moana in Te Reo Maori at cinemas in Wellington during the weekend of the 16th and 17th of September.

 

 

 

Check out screening times at:

The Embassy.

Reading Cinemas Courtenay.

The Roxy Cinemas.

A great event to bring the whole family to enjoy a Disney Classic and learn, or brush up on your Te Reo Māori.

New Non Fiction: Junior Non Fiction to get you started on your journey to Beyond the Page.

Hey Kids! Hope you enjoyed some of the fabulous events at the Beyond the Page Festival. Check out some junior non fiction books to help you follow up some of the events that took place at this memorable festival. Hopefully your creativity, literary and digital knowledge has been inspired. This post kicks off with books on coding – to collaborate with the Meet The Robots and Lego Challenge.

Enjoy!

image courtesy of syndeticsCoding Games in SCRATCH.

Coding computer programs is one of the most valuable skills for anyone to have. Written for children with little to no coding experience, Coding Games with Scratch guides children through building platform games, puzzles, racers, and 3-D action games. Schools have incorporated computer coding into their curriculum, beginning as early as kindergarten to ensure students understand the languages and uses of computer coding. The step-by-step guides are simple and easy to follow with Minecraft-style pixel art. Children will learn essential coding skills while having fun and creating games to play with their friends. The many different styles and types of games are covered, such as classic and arcade games. When people learn to code in Scratch, they learn important strategies for solving problems, designing projects, and communicating ideas. Coding Games with Scratch empowers children to be creative and to have fun while teaching them practical real-life skills. Great for ages 9 to 12 years old.

Also check out:

image courtesy of syndeticsComputer coding games for kids.

Your kids will be building computer games and learning code in no-time with ‘Computer coding games for kids’. Kids can enter the world of programming in this illustrated guide packed with step-by-step explanations showing kids how to build all types of games, from puzzles and racers to 3D action games. The perfect way to introduce a reluctant child to coding, ‘Computer coding games for kids’ shows kids how to have fun with Scratch by creating games. Simple instructions and graphics breakdown coding with Scratch so kids learn all the code they need to build, play and share their favourite games with friends.

image courtesy of syndeticsHelp your kids with computer coding : a unique step-by-step visual guide, from binary code to building games.

This unique guide is full of fun exercises and helpful tips that will help children learn all aspects of coding. Step-by-step explanations make the complex art of programming clear, teaching the basics of JavaScript, Python, and C++. Eventually building to more advanced projects, Help Your Kids with Computer Coding will have children and parents alike creating their own games, apps, 3-D models, animations, and websites in no time. 

image courtesy of syndetics365 Things to do with Lego Bricks.

“365 Things to Do with LEGO® Bricks inspires you to look at your LEGO bricks in new and exciting ways. This interactive book features imaginative play and building ideas, from LEGO projects that take just a few minutes and require a handful of bricks to inspirational build ideas and activities to keep you occupied for hours. Visual tips and advice from LEGO fan builders will encourage you to get creative and have fun while learning new building skills such as building your own LEGO pet, challenging your friends to make the tallest LEGO tower against the clock, and creating a LEGO treasure hunt. 365 Things to Do with LEGO Bricks is full of games and activities that will keep you busy every day of the year, “–Amazon.com.

image courtesy of sydneticsThe Lego Ideas Book: Unlock your imagination.

Features all-new LEGO® building projects, tips to supplement and enhance your LEGO creations, inspirational builds, and expert advice from LEGO Master Builders.

Author Visit: Des Hunt at Central Library.

Attention all literary fans! Come on down to the Central Library and learn how to create amazing stories with a master storyteller! Join 2017 Margaret Mahy Medal and Lecture Award winner Des Hunt for a writing workshop like no other. This event is part of Beyond the Page, a literary festival for children and youth on from 8-23 July, for more information, check out the website.

Where: Wellington Central Library, Young Adults area.

When: Tuesday 11th July, 1pm to 2pm.

Age Group: This workshop is aimed at ages 9-12 and spaces are limited. Make sure you register to secure a spot.

About Des Hunt: Des Hunt was a science and technology teacher for many years, interspersed with periods of curriculum development both in New Zealand and overseas. During this time he had several textbooks published to support the New Zealand curriculum. Over the last twenty years he has experimented with other ways of interesting youngsters in science, creating computer games and writing non-fiction and fiction with scientific themes.

After living in Auckland for much of his life he moved with his wife, Lynne, to Matarangi on New Zealand’s Coromandel Peninsula. He retired from the classroom in 2007 to concentrate on writing fiction for children. He continues his aims of fostering young peoples’ natural interest in the science of their surroundings by visiting schools and libraries where he runs workshops and presentations.

Five Des Hunt books have been finalists at the Children’s Book Awards. Cry of the Taniwha was awarded the 2016 Storylines Gaelyn Gordon Award for a Much-loved Book. Then, in 2017, Des was the recipient of the Storylines Margaret Mahy Medal and Lecture Award for lifetime achievement and a distinguished contribution to New Zealand children’s literature and literacy.

Find out more about Des and his books: www.deshunt.com

While You’re at it, check out some of Des Hunt’s books that you can find at your local library.

Enjoy!

image courtesy of syndeticsPhantom of Terawhiti.

“It’s the school holidays and Zac thinks he might go crazy with boredom. He’s living in exile with his disgraced father on the remote Terawhiti Station on Wellington’s wild south-west coast. Zac and his father witness a shipwreck off the coast. Investigating further, he finds a set of unusual paw prints on the beach. Whose yacht it is? And what animal could have made the paw prints? Soon Zac is drawn into a mystery which threatens his life and those around him. He must protect the secret of the Phantom of Terawhiti from those intent on hunting it – and him – down”–Publisher information.

image courtesy of syndeticsFrog Whistle Mine.

Twelve-year-old Tony has travelled all around New Zealand with his nomadic mother, and desperately wants somewhere to belong. When they arrive in Charleston, a gold-mining ghost town, he is almost afraid to hope this might finally be the place. But things aren’t as they seem, and he finds himself caught up in mysterious events.

 

image courtesy of syndeticsWhere cuckoos call.

Twelve-year-old Ben is a keen ornithologist who looks after endangered birds on his family farm in the Coromandel Peninsula. But Ben must grow up fast in the face of threats to his home, his family and his beloved birds.

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsWhale Pot Bay.

Jake lives with his father in a remote part of the Wairarapa, where he can surf and watch the whales. But then Jake’s dad begins a relationship with a new partner, who moves in with her daughter Stephanie, and at the same time a local photographer starts stalking their next door neighbour Milton Summer, an international rock celebrity, and Jake’s peaceful life erupts into violence and deceit. An when a whale and her calf get into trouble on the treacherous coast, the history of Whale Pot Bay seems doomed to repeat itself unless Jake, Milton and Stephanie can survive the deadly tide.

image couresty of syndeticsCry of the taniwha.

Matt Logan isn’t looking forward to spending the school holidays in Rotorua with his grandmother and her new husband. Matt has taken his metal detector along, and when he and Juzza – the boy next door – unearth a handcuffed skeleton, a dangerous chain of events begins to coil around them.