8 New Non Fiction to read in Term 3.

Hey Kids!

Experiencing the back to school blues? Check out the latest new non fiction at your local library to read during Term 3 where you can learn, be entertained and have fun all at once! Check out books on ancient worlds, official guides to the latest movie releases, science, innovation, creativity and much, much more!

Enjoy!

image courtesy of syndeticsAncient Greece.

Read all about Ancient Greece in this engaging nonfiction book, complete with black and white interior illustrations, will make readers feel like they’ve traveled back in time. Covers information such as what ancient Greeks did for fun to the gods and goddesses they worshipped, and more.

 

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsJurassic World: From DNA to Indominus Rex!: An Augmented Reality Book.

 

This new title features a brilliant overview of the Jurassic Park trilogy and Jurassic World, and includes genetically engineered, terror-inspiring dinosaurs from the whole series, including new profiles for Tyrannosaurus rex, Indominus rex, Velociraptor, and much more!

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsThe Space Race.

“When people think about the space race, things like astronauts and the Soviet Union may come to mind. But why was there a race, and who won anyway? Prepare to blast back and find out! Discover everything from what happened during the Cold War to the moon landing and more. And find out interesting, little-known facts such as how even animals have traveled to space and how not all space explorers are called ‘astronauts.'”– Book jacket.

 

 


image courtesy of syndetics

Brain lab for kids : 52 mind-blowing experiments, models, and activities to explore neuroscience.

“Brain Lab for Kids is an interactive and hands-on book that takes readers on an exciting journey into the functions of the brain through enlightening experiments and creative activities.”– Provided by publisher.

 

 

image courtesy of syndeticsThe Lego Neighbourhood book.

Provides complete step-by-step instructions for multistory buildings, recliners, and traffic lights constructed with LEGO pieces. A must have book for lego fans.

 

 

 

 

image courtesy of syendticsMangoes & Bananas.

An Indonesian folktale about Kanchil the mouse deer and Monyet the monkey accompanied by art in the traditional Kalamkari style of Indian textile painting.

 

 

 

IMAGE COURTESY OF SYNDETICSAll about China : stories, songs, crafts and games for kids.

Travel from the stone age through the dynasties to the present day with songs and crafts for kids that will educate them about Chinese language and the Chinese way of life.

 

 

 

image courtesy of sydneticsSolo, a Star Wars story : the official guide.

A visual guide to the movie offers a behind-the-scenes look into the lives of Han Solo, his allies and enemies, along with information on the planets, vehicles, and aliens he encounters.

Check out the Solo, a Star Wards story movie trailer down below:

 

 

 

Kids’ Club Review by Luke: Dragonfly song

Dragonfly songDragonfly song, by Wendy Orr (1953-)

Set in the Bronze Age, Aissa’s whole adopted family is murdered and she is abandoned. Unable to speak she becomes a slave but when she turns 12, she discovered who she is. In order to escape her terrible life, she has to take part in the bloody bull dance. Will she survive? The is a great book with a riveting story. I think children 10+ would enjoy this book and I rate it 5 stars.

5 stars

Reviewed by Luke from Karori and Karori Normal School , 12 years old

Kids’ Club Review by Anna: Dragonfly song

Dragonfly songDragonfly song, by Wendy Orr (1953-)

This book is about Aissa (which means dragonfly) who’s adopted family is murdered. She is made to be a slave and cannot speak. This book was well written but I think it is more suited to children older than me as it took me a long time to read. My sister thought it was excellent. I would recommend this book to people 10+.

4 stars

Reviewed by Anna from Karori and Karori Normal School , 8 years old

Kids’ Club Review by Genevye: Hour of the Olympics

Hour of the OlympicsHour of the Olympics, by Mary Pope Osborne

I think this book is the best one out of the ones i read , because i learned so much facts from this book . Like no girls allowed in the Olympics games , which is kind of not fair , because like everyone should go there . But i understand that these greece people chose this . Because each country has different rules. So that’s the reason why this book is the best out of all the ones i read. I recommend 7 + or 8 + .

5 stars

Reviewed by Genevye from Central City and Churton Park School , 7 years old

Kids’ Club Review by Anna: Dragonfly song

Dragonfly songDragonfly song, by Wendy Orr (1953-)

A moving tale written by an amazing author. I can see why it’s an award winner. Aissa is such an amazing character. When she’s an outcast she knows what she needs and how to get it. Luki is so kind. Milli-Cat is so cute and her kittens are awesome. Gold-Cat is my personal favourite. As soon as I put it down I wanted to read it again. Well done, Wendy Orr.

5 stars

Reviewed by Anna from Miramar and Miramar Central School , 10 years old

The ancient history of the Olympics

Syndetics book cover

The Olympic games began in Olympia, Greece in 776 BC (that’s almost 3000 years ago!). It was a sporting competition to celebrate excellence and honour the god Zeus.

The first few olympics just had a running race and only lasted one day, but more events got added on later and it became a five day event. Because ancient Greece would often have conflicts going on between city-states there would be a sacred truce (Ekecheiria) during the games so that athletes and spectators could travel to and from Olympia safely.

 

 

 

Competitors from all over Greece and sometimes beyond would compete in sporting events including foot-races (running), the pentathlon (running, long jump, discus, javelin and wrestling), boxing, wrestling, the pankration, and equestrian races (horse and chariot). Pankration is a combination of boxing and wresting and was a particularly brutal event.

Fun Fact: the participants would also compete naked! In fact the Greek word for nude was gymnós which is where our word for gymnasiums comes from.

The ancient olympics also did not allow women to compete in the events, and only unmarried women were allowed to be spectators. Despite this, in 396 BC Kyniska of Sparta became the first female Olympic victor for the chariot race, because the owners of the horses were considered the winners of the race, not the riders.

Instead of receiving gold, silver and bronze medals, there was only one victor in each of the events and they were rewarded with a wreath (wild olive leaf crown), and of course the glory and honour of being an olympic victor (in other words – bragging rights!)

In 393 AD the new Roman emperor and Christian, Theodosius, banned the olympic games because he considered them a pagan practice. So ended 1,000 years of tradition, during which 293 olympics games were held. That is until Pierre de Coubertin, a French academic and historian, pushed to resurrect them and so began the modern olympic games in 1896 Athens, Greece.

 

Want to know more? Find these books in your local library:

Syndetics book coverThe first Olympics of ancient Greece by Lisa M. Bolt Simons

“In ancient Greece different city-states often fought one another in deadly battles. But every four years the Greeks set aside their differences to honor the gods and compete peacefully in the Olympic Games. Learn all about the athletes, competitions, and religious ceremonies of the ancient Olympics.” (Syndetics summary)

 

 

Syndetics book coverOlympics by Richard Platt
“‘In the same spirit as the previous Through Time titles, this book explores the evolution of the Olympic Games, from its ancient origins to modern times. The chronological format allows the reader to experience life in many diverse cities and cultures during different historical periods. Through Time: The Olympic Games tells the complete story of history’s most famous, and most international, sporting competition. The narrative runs from city to city, exploring the impact of the Games on each host nation as well as the key social, political and cultural events of the time. Woven into this narrative are all the major sporting highlights, facts and record-breakers.” (Syndetics summary)

 

 

Flaming Olympics by Michael Coleman

This hilarious guide tells readers everything they need to know, from the torture of Olympic training, to some of the best performances dating back as far as 776 BC.

 

Kids’ Club Review by Brianna: The Magic Treehouse – Hour of the Olympics

The Magic Treehouse – Hour of the Olympics, by Mary Pope Osborne

“No girls allowed at the Olympic Games!” That’s the rule when the Magic Treehouse sends Jack and Annie back to ancient Greece. But when Annie tells Jack to go to the Olympic games without her, he knows she’s up to something! Will Annie find a way to see the games? Or will she get herself – and Jack – into Olympic-size trouble. Read this book to find out!

5 stars

Reviewed by Brianna from Island Bay and St Francis De Sales School , 8 years old

6 New Non Fiction to get you back into the back to school groove.

Complete Photo Guide to Bead Crafts.

This book provides information on bead crafting, including bead types, skills and techniques, and simple projects for parents and their children to practice essential skills. A great book to have on hand on a rainy day and during school holidays.

 

 

Space record Breakers.

Look inside this book and prepare to have the most mind-blowing records experience in the universe. Read this book and get information about  outer space and human space exploration, including the planet with the most moons, the first woman in space, and the closest star to the solar system. You will also get to find out which is the biggest known planet? What’s the hottest star? Who’s the most intrepid astronaut?

 

 

New from Eyewitness…

Dog.

Read this book and find out everything you need to know about caring for dogs, working dogs, from those that rescue people to those in the military and find out which dog breed is perfect for you as your family pet.

 

 

Ancient Greece.

This is an engaging and entertaining reference guide about Ancient Greece – perfect for younger readers. Discover epic tales of heroes and villains of the ancient Greek world. A great resource to use for a project on Ancient Greece and classical studies.

 

 

Gandhi.

Reading this book will allow you  to be a part of Gandhi’s extraordinary life story and relive a momentous chapter in history. See who Gandhi was as a person: from a time child to a freedom fighter and religious leader.

 

 

Cat.

Discover in this book how cats can hear the slightest noise and smell other animals in the dark, why cheetahs are the fastest land animals in the world and see the unusual and rare feline breeds, from the hairless Sphinx cat to the white tiger.

 

Kids’ Club Review by Zachary: The groovy Greeks

The groovy GreeksThe groovy Greeks, by Terry Deary

I found this book hard to read because it was very confusing some of it is for kids and some look like it is for grown-ups and I got really confused.
I have given it 3 stars because you can learn a lot about what happened and the pictures are good. I would recommend it for children 9+

3 stars

Reviewed by Zachary from Island Bay, 8 years old