Top 10 Children’s non-fiction February 2017

Lego has always been a favourite in the Children’s non-fiction collection, but have you ever considered using your own lego collection to make history?  Not only is the 2017 Guinness World records in the Top 10 but, they are also accepting bids for the largest Lego pyramid ever… with teams of unlimited size! So round up your mates, and their mates and their… so on and so on and who knows, Guiness World record 2018 could contain your name!

  1. Minecraft : the survivors’ book of secrets, by Stephanie Milton.
  2. Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, by Jack Thorne, John Tiffany and J. K. Rowling
  3. Minecraft : Redstone handbook, by Nick Farwell
  4. The LEGO ideas book, by Daniel Lipkowitz
  5. Star Wars Character Encyclopedia, by Simon Beecroft and Pablo Hidalgo
  6. Master builder : Hack for Minecrafters, by Megan Miller
  7. Minecraft : Construction Handbook, by Matthew Needler
  8. Small scenes from a big galaxy, by Vesa Lehtimäki
  9. Lego DC comics Super heroes character encyclopedia, by Simon Hugo and Cavan Scott
  10. Guinness World Records 2017, Craig Glenday editor in chief

Top 10 Children’s non-fiction January 2017

Ocean dwelling creatures and literature make the grade this month.  The clever people at Te Papa can take you on a virtual journey to the deepest depths, the Abyssopelagic zone, this is even deeper than where they believe the colossal squid had it’s hunting grounds.
Anyone braved the sea out there this summer? Let us know in the comments if you found any cool sea creatures in your ocean exploring =)

  1. Minecraft annual 2017, by Stephanie Milton
  2. Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, by Jack Thorne, John Tiffany and J. K. Rowling
  3. Minecraft : Redstone Handbook, by Nick Farwell
  4. Supershark and other creatures of the deep, by Derek Harvey
  5. The LEGO ideas book, by Daniel Lipkowitz
  6. Small scenes from a big galaxy, by Vesa Lehtimäki
  7. Minecraft hacks master builder, by Megan Miller
  8. Pokémon gotta catch ’em all, published by Scholastic
  9. Minecraft, by Matthew Needler and Phil Southam
  10. Picturepedia, edited by Ann Baggaley

Top 10 Children’s non-fiction July 2016

Minecraft domination! This game has taken over the top ten this month!

Other popular books from the libraries’ non-fiction collections covered Arabic language and Matariki. We’ve been having some great clear skies in the evening, giving you a chance to spy out the constellations in our winter sky.

Arabic language books are part of the foreign language collection in the Children’s non-fiction.  There are stories in different languages from around the world as well as dictionaries and books that help with learning a new language.

You don’t have to travel far to use other languages as we are lucky to have people from many different countries living in Wellington.  Great phrases to have handy are “hello and goodbye, please and thankyou”.  Did you know that New Zealand has three official languages? Te Reo. English and Sign Language.

How many languages can you say  these words in? Let us know in the comments.

Ka kite!

 

Here’s your Top 10 for July 2016:

1. The LEGO ideas book, by Daniel Lipkowitz

2. Minecraft: beginner’s handbook, by Stephanie Milton, Paul Soares, Jordan Maron and Joe Bolder

3. Star Wars, David West Reynolds

4. Star Wars character encyclopedia, by Simon Beecroft

5. Minecraft: redstone handbook, by Nick Farwell

6. Minecraft hacks master builder, by Megan Miller

7. LEGO play book, by Daniel Lipkowitz

8. Hacks for Minecrafters, by Megan Miller

9. Minecraft, by Matthew Needler and Phil Southam

10. Cool creations in 35 pieces, by Sean Kinney

Top 10 Children’s non-Fiction May 2016

Te Whanganui-a-Tara has hit the top 10! The taniwha legend portrayed by Moira Wairama has a Te Reo version, Ngā taniwha i Te Whanga-nui-a-tara in the library.

These titles are great for looking at your hometown as a site for battling behemoths and using your Māori language, these books come with a CD of the tale inside.

Creators of their own worlds are finding inspiration in both the virtual and physical world.  The creators using Lego and Minecraft are holding the sway of the listings.  Master builder Yvonne Doyle is one of the model builders used by DK publishers in their famous Lego books.

How about your own model building? What have you been inspired to build from your library loans? Let us know in the comments.

Here’s May’s top 10 list:

1.  LEGO, by Daniel Lipkowitz

2.  Minecraft, by Megan Miller

3.  Star Wars, by David West Reynolds

4.  Minecraft, by Stephanie Milton

5.  Star Wars, by Adam Bray

6.  Minecraft, by Nick Farwell

7.  Star Wars character encyclopedia, by Simon Beecroft

8.  Minecraft, by Matthew Needler and Phil Southam

9.  The taniwha of Wellington Harbour, by Moira Wairama

10. Minecraft blockopedia, by Alex Wiltshire

Make up a Maker Kit at your library

Lego Creator 3n1 SmallNew at your library – Maker Kits!

What are Maker Kits? They are boxes of creative bits and pieces that you can use in your library to make something amazing. All you need is a library card and a bit of imagination.

There’s a wide variety of Maker Kits to grab – Wooden Blocks, Lego, Meccano, Doll Houses and Rocket Ships, and there will be more coming!

Discovery Space Centre

A few things you need to know:

– Each Wellington City Library has Maker Kits, but each Library has something different

– Each Kit has a minimum age for use, so you can only use the Kits that you are old enough for

– Kits are for use in the library only

– They have to be issued on to a Parent/Guardian library card (a Guardian is someone aged 14yrs or older who is in charge of a younger person)

– Ask at the library counter to see the Kits your library has.

 

Lego Star Wars T-16 SkyhopperMeccano Turbo 2Maple Blocks