7 new children’s non-fiction for the start of 2019

Hi Kids! Check out more new non fiction in the junior collection to read in 2019. Books featured in this post include information about Robots, the lady, (Spoiler: Mary Shelley), who wrote a famous novel about a zombie, (Spoiler: Frankenstein), and so much more!

Enjoy!

image courtesy of syndeticsHubots : real-world robots inspired by humans.

“Robots that look, act and think like humans are no longer the stuff of science fiction – they actually exist in the real world! Hubots explores the characteristics of 10 human-like robots, examines the challenges of integrating them into society and offers a sneak peek at the next generation.”–Page [4] of cover.


image courtesy of sydneticsDivorce is the worst.

“”How can you not love a children’s author who sees so clearly from her reader’s point of view?”–Julie Bowen, actress, Modern Family, “This book provides, through honest language and evocative imagery, a uniquely realistic view of how children experience divorce. While neither softening or white-washing this difficult topic, Higginbotham offers an ultimately comforting message to parents and children experiencing separation and divorce.”-Lisa Spiegel, LMHC, Soho Parenting, NYCKids are told, “it’s for the best”-and one day, it may be. But right now, divorce is the worst. With honesty and humor, Anastasia Higginbotham beautifully conveys the challenge of staying whole when your entire world, and the people in it, split apart. The first children’s book to tackle divorce from a child-validating point of view, Divorce Is the Worst is an invaluable tool for families, therapeutic professionals, and divorce mediators struggling to address this common and complex experience. Divorce Is the Worst is the first book in a series of feminist children’s books, Ordinary Terrible Things, which deals with common childhood crises and how children themselves find their own way to cope and grow. Anastasia Higginbotham is a writer and illustrator in Brooklyn, NY, whose childhood experience of divorce inspired this book”– Provided by publisher.


image courtesy of syndeticsGirls’ home spa lab : all-natural recipes, healthy habits, and feel-good activities to make you glow.

“For today’s active, plugged-in girls ages 9 to 13, finding healthy ways to unwind and de-stress is an important part of well-being. Girls’ Home Spa Lab is packed with all-natural recipes, activities, and tips for self-care and relaxation specially designed for tweens. From homemade facial steams and hair masks to foot soaks, tub teas, and body balms, the 50 head-to-toe recipes can be easily made from ingredients found in the kitchen cupboard, like honey, oats, and coconut oil. Girls will also learn how to soothe themselves with easy yoga poses, homemade sleep tea, and natural remedies for a headache, stuffy nose, or sore throat. Maya Pag├ín’s upbeat voice encourages girls to explore their creativity and develop self-confidence while having fun mixing up their own spa treatments.”– Provided by publisher.


image courtesy of syndeticsMary who wrote Frankenstein.

How does a story begin? Sometimes it begins with a dream, and a dreamer. Mary is one such dreamer, a little girl who learns to read by tracing the letters on the tombstone of her famous feminist mother, Mary Wollstonecraft, and whose only escape from her strict father and overbearing stepmother is through the stories she reads and imagines. Unhappy at home, she seeks independence, and at the age of sixteen runs away with poet Percy Bysshe Shelley, another dreamer. Two years later, they travel to Switzerland where they meet a famous poet, Lord Byron. On a stormy summer evening, with five young people gathered around a fire, Byron suggests a contest to see who can create the best ghost story. Mary has a waking dream about a monster come to life. A year and a half later, Mary Shelley’s terrifying tale, Frankenstein: or, the Modern Prometheus, is published — a novel that goes on to become the most enduring monster story ever and one of the most popular legends of all time. A riveting and atmospheric picture book about the young woman who wrote one of the greatest horror novels ever written and one of the first works of science fiction, Mary Who Wrote Frankenstein is an exploration of the process of artistic inspiration that will galvanize readers and writers of all ages.


image courtesy of syndetics

Cool builds in Minecraft

Teaches players how to build fifty different objects in Minecraft, including houses, vehicles, farms, and castles.


image courtesy of syndetics2019 Game On!

Learn all about the hottest games like Marvel Vs. Capcom: Infinite and Spider-Man, how they were developed, and how to beat them in this annual gaming guide. Get ready for another awesome year of gaming with this ultimate guide to the best games including a definitive list of the biggest games of the past year and the new ones coming in 2019. Featuring Five Nights at Freddy’s and Hello Neighbor! Game On! 2019, the most comprehensive guide to all the best games, tech, and YouTube stars, features some of the year’s greatest moments including exclusive interviews with YouTube legends, top streamers and game developers. This complete guide is packed with information on all the latest gaming hardware, tech, and essential mobile games. Also including the best gaming secrets, stats, tips, and tricks to help unlock achievements and trophies on games like Marvel Vs. Capcom: Infinite, Spider-Man, GT Sport, Sea of Thieves, and so much more! All games featured in Game On! 2019 are rated T for Teen or younger keeping it appropriate for young gamers.


image courtesy of syndeticsRobotpedia.

Take an in-depth look at the history and cultural impact of robots through the years in this educational and interactive guide! Robots are everywhere-building cars, driving cars, performing surgery, helping soldiers and fire fighters, even vacuuming! From high up in space to the bottom of the ocean, robots are an instrumental part of how humans are learning about the world. This encyclopedic guide to robotics takes kids through the evolution of robotic technology: from the ancient Greek inventors, to the first robot at the World’s Fair, to nanotechnology already in use today, to D.I.Y. robotics, and even a peek into the robotic future as told by the scientists creating it. And keeping readers company along the way are many of our favorite robots from film and TV. Filled with interactive inserts, Robotpedia takes a fun approach to STEM learning.