Check out these new children’s fiction Books!

Image courtesy of SyndeticsI am Juliet by Jackie French

The world’s most famous love story told by one of Australia’s most respected authors. This is the well-known story of Juliet Capulet and her love for Romeo. It also the story about the increasing helplessness Juliet feels as she realises that unlike young men her age, her life will effectively be determined and controlled by others, who see her having an arranged marriage of alliance and becoming a breeder of sons. I am Juliet closely follows the well-known and loved plot of the play, but we also see the point of view of Rob, the thirteen-year-old boy who is the first to play the role of Juliet on the Elizabethan stage.



Image courtesy of SyndeticsJelly Baby  by Jean Ure     

A humorous and heart-warming story about a little sister, a big sister, a cat, a dad and…a new girlfriend! Bitsy, or Jelly Baby as she’s sometimes called, has been doing just fine living with Dad and big sister Em since Mum died. The housework may not always get done, and dinners might not always be at the table, but none of them ever minded! Until one day Dad brings home a girlfriend – and everything changes. Now it looks like it might be down to the Jelly Baby of the family to keep it from falling apart.





Image courtesy of SyndeticsLilac Attack! by Sophie Bell

While sixth-grade superheroes Scarlet, Iris, and Cheri are trying to decide if the formerly evil Opal can be trusted to be an Ultra Violet again, they face a new BeauTek plot, purportedly to beautify Sync City.






Image courtesy of SyndeticsEye of the Gargoyle by Sam Penant

Dax’s parents have put him on a bus to a prison to which he doesn’t belong. Little does he know that this ‘prison’, Scragmoor Prime, is actually a school for superheroes! But Dax Daley doesn’t have any superpowers! Or does he?





Image courtesy of SyndeticsThe Fastest Boy in the World  by Elizabeth Laird

‘Eleven-year-old Solomon loves to run! The great athletes of the Ethiopian national team are his heroes and he dreams that one day he will be a gold-medal-winning athlete like them, in spite of his ragged shorts and bare feet. When his grandfather announces that he’s going to take Solomon to Addis Ababa, Solomon cannot believe his ears. A trip to the capital? It’s unfathomable. Solomon’s joy is increased when he realizes that the Ethiopian running team will be doing a victory parade through the city that day. Maybe he’ll get a glimpse of Haile Gebrselassie or Derartu Tulu?!

But Solomon’s grandfather has other plans. As Solomon follows him through the big, overwhelming streets, he learns something he cannot believe. The strict old man is a war hero who once risked his life to save a friend and has been in hiding ever since. When grandfather collapses, Solomon knows that getting help from his village is up to him. It’s a twenty-mile run from the city to home, and grandfather’s life hangs in the balance. Can the small bare-footed runner with the big heart do it?’ ;



Image courtesy of SyndeticsWhat the Moon Said by Gayle Rosengreen

When Esther’s family moves to a farm during the Great Depression, she soon learns that there are things much more important than that her superstitious mother rarely shows her any affection.