Anō, toitū te whenua: New Māori books

Our latest list of new Māori material includes an interesting fictionalised account of the Battle of Ōrākau, in both Te Reo and English by Witi Ihimaera. Pūkaki, a book about the Ngāti Whakaue ancestor has now been translated into te reo. A research publication on indigenous aspects of business and management include an overview of the environmental failures of the MV Rena written by Ella Henry.

Syndetics book coverSleeps standing : a story of the Battle of Orākau / Witi Ihimaera ; with Hēmi Kelly.
“Both fiction and fact, this fascinating book is a kaleidoscopic exploration of the Battle of Orakau …The battle marked the end of the Land Wars in the Waikato and resulted in vast tracts of land being confiscated for European settlement … It is estimated that, at the height of the battle, 1700 immensely superior troops, well-armed and amply resourced, laid siege to the hastily constructed pa at Orakau. The defenders were heavily outnumbered with few supplies or weapons but, when told to submit, they replied- ‘E hoa, ka whawhai tonu matou, ake, ake, ake!’ ‘Friend, I shall fight against you for ever, for ever!'” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverExtinguishing title : Maori land rights, people, and perspective in post-colonial New Zealand / Stella Coram.
“Without question, British ‘settlement’ of the new colony created a demand for Māori land and, to facilitate the sale of the land, the “Crown set about transferring customary land into individual title… My concern is that another injustice is being created since rights to title, required of Māori by the Crown in order to retain their land, are being summarily dismissed.” (Preface, pp. xiii-xiv)

Syndetics book coverTura and the fairies ; and, The overworlds and Tu : from Maori legendary lore / by Johannes Andersen.
“This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverIndigenous aspirations and rights : the case for responsible business and management / edited by Amy Klemm Verbos, Ella Henry and Ana Maria Peredo.
Indigenous Aspirations and Rights takes an Indigenous perspective in examining the intersection of business with Indigenous peoples’ rights, in light of the UN Global Compact and the PRME. Indigenous rights include, but are not limited to, human, cultural, educational, employment, participatory development, economic, and social rights, rights to land and natural resources, and impacts on identity, institutions, and relations. This book illustrates three main aspects of business practices in relation to Indigenous peoples: learning from failure, unresolved issues and on-going challenges, and developing models for success.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverPūkaki : te hokinga mai o te auahitūroa / Paul Tapsell ; whakamāoritanga nā Scotty te Manahau Morrison.
“First published in English in 2000, Paul Tapsell’s award-winning work brilliantly captured the life and transformations of Pūkaki the Ngāti Whakaue ancestor depicted on the New Zealand 20-cent coin. Now a superb translation by Scotty Morrison (also of Ngāti Whakaue descent) makes this illustrated work available entirely in Te Reo Māori.” (Syndetics summary)

Point of order, Mr Speaker? : modern Māori political leaders / edited by Selwyn and Rāhui Katene.
“Eight current or former Māori politicians from different political parties recount their leadership experiences and describe the significant events in their journeys from their early lives to Parliament. Paula Bennett, Te Ururoa Flavell, Hone Harawira, Tau Henare, Shane Jones, Nanaia Mahuta, Hekia Parata and Metiria Turei give readers a unique glimpse into their personal and public lives. They share their aspirations, lessons learned and knowledge gained while making meaningful contributions to Māori development.” (Syndetics summary)

He waka eke noa

I te marama nei : he whakamātau hinengaro, he mana whakairo hinengaro, he mana motuhake, he wai māori, i te ao hurihuri : indigenous issues of psychology, intellectual property rights, water rights, in the evolving world.

Syndetics book coverThe Māori meeting house : introducing the whare whakairo / Damian Skinner.
“This all-new guide to the whare whakairo, or decorated Maori meeting house, covers every aspect of these treasures–their history and evolution, structure and art forms, and symbolism and cultural significance. With more than a hundred intriguing historical and contemporary photographs, and containing dozens of diagrams and a helpful glossary, the book clearly illustrates the parts, and the arts, of the whare whakairo with reference to numerous meeting houses from all over Aotearoa New Zealand and the world… The Maori Meeting House makes an important contribution to contemporary discussions about indigenous art history and taonga Maori.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverArtefacts of encounter : Cook’s voyages, colonial collecting and museum histories / edited by Nicholas Thomas, Julie Adams, Billie Lythberg, Maia Nuku & Amiria Salmond ; photography by Gwil Owen.
“The Pacific artefacts and works of art collected during the three voyages of Captain James Cook and the navigators, traders and missionaries who followed him are of foundational importance for the study of art and culture in Oceania… The Cook voyage collection at the MAA is among the four or five most important in the world, containing over 200 of the 2000-odd objects with Cook voyage provenance that are dispersed throughout the world. This stunning book catalogues this collection, and its cutting-edge scholarship sheds new light on the significance of many artefacts of encounter.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverIndigenous notions of ownership and libraries, archives and museums / edited by Camille Callison, Loriene Roy and Gretchen Alice LeCheminant.
“Forms of indigenous knowledges and cultural expressions are found in libraries, archives or museums. Often the “legal” copyright is not held by the indigenous people’s groups, who believe that the true expression of their culture can only be sustained and remain dynamic in its proper cultural context. The aim is to respect these ways of knowing while appreciating the cultural memory institutions’ attempts to transmit them to the next generation.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTupuna awa : people and politics of the Waikato River / Marama Muru-Lanning.
“‘We have always owned the water . . . we have never ceded our mana over the river to anyone’, King Tuheitia Paki asserted in 2012. Prime Minister John Key disagreed: ‘King Tuheitia’s claim that Maori have always owned New Zealand’s water is just plain wrong’. So who does own the water in New Zealand – if anyone – and why does it matter? By examining the debates over water in one New Zealand river, over a single recent period, Muru-Lanning provides a powerful lens through which to view modern iwi politics, debates over water ownership, and contests for power between Maori and the state.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Te manu kai i te mātauranga : indigenous psychology in Aotearoa/New Zealand / Waikaremoana Waitoki & Michelle Levy, editors.
Contents: Foreword: Ka awatea / Michelle Levy & Waikaremoana Waitoki — Introduction: My name is Ripeka / Waikaremoana Waitoki — Chapter 1: Kaupapa Māori psychologies / Michelle Levy — Chapter 2: A ripple of intimacy with creation : the stone bird of sorrow / Virginia Tamanui — Chapter 3: Whanaungatanga : asking who you are; not, what you are / Maynard Gilgen and Māmari Stephens — Chapter 4: Te toka tū moana : resilience, love and hope / Ainsleigh Cribb-Su’a & Hilda Te Pania-Hemopo — Chapter 5: Healing whānau violence : a love story / Erana Cooper & Sharon Rickard — Chapter 6: Re : “I just want to heal my family” / Lisa Cherrington — Chapter 7: Ngā rākau a te pākehā : Matiu’s story / Simon Bennett — Chapter 8: A new moon : talking story with Ripeka to support the healing of soul wounds / Melissa Taitimu — Chapter 9: Wairuatanga / Hukarere Valentine — Chapter 10: ‘Haerenga ki waiora’ : my experience of inpatient mental health services / Julie Wharewera-Mika — Chapter 11: Māori and neuropsychological assessment / Margaret Dudley — Chapter 12: He wāhine āwhina : a healing narrative of end of life care / Tess Moeke-Maxwell — Chapter 13: A partnered approach to psychological assessment : he ritenga whaimōhio / Sonja Macfarlane — Chapter 14: Kaihau waiū : attributes gained through mother’s milk : the importance of our very first relationship / Tania Cargo — Chapter 15: He kākano mai I rangiātea / Bridgette Masters-Awatere — Chapter 16: Ngā kete mātauranga : a curriculum for an indigenous psychology / Waikaremoana Waitoki.

Syndetics book coverThe Great War for New Zealand : Waikato 1800-2000 / Vincent O’Malley.
“A monumental new account of the defining conflict in New Zealand history. It was war in the Waikato in 1863-64 that shaped the nation in all kinds of ways: setting back Māori and Pākehā relations by several generations and allowing the government to begin to assert the kind of real control over the country that had eluded it since 1840. Spanning nearly two centuries from first contact through to settlement and apology, Vincent O’Malley focuses on the human impact of the war, its origins and aftermath. Based on many years of research and illustrated throughout, The Great War for New Zealand is a groundbreaking book written in the conviction that a nation needs to own its history.” (Publisher information)

E ngā uri whakatupu : weaving legacies : Dame Rangimarie Hetet and Diggeress Te Kanawa / authors, Ngahuia Te Awekotuku, Kahutoi Mere Te Kanawa, Rangituatahi Te Kanawa, Barbara Pareatai Moke.
“Describes the Waikato Museum Te Whare Taonga o Waikato exhibition, ‘E nga uri whakatupu, Weaving legacies : Dame Rangimarie Hetet and Diggeress Rangituatahi Te Kanawa’, which ran from 29th June 2014 to 28th July 2015 and was the most significant collection of Maori korowai and weaving ever shown in Aotearoa New Zealand. Includes a waiata composed by Dame Rangimarie Hetet.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverJourney to a hanging / Peter Wells.
“Part history, part biography, part social commentary, this fascinating book is about infamous events that shook New Zealand to its core. In 1865, Rev Carl Sylvius Volkner was hanged, his head cut off, his eyes eaten and his blood drunk from his church chalice. One name – Kereopa Te Rau (Kaiwhatu: The Eye-eater) – became synonymous with the murder. In 1871 he was captured, tried and sentenced to death. But then something remarkable happened. Sister Aubert and William Colenso – two of the greatest minds in colonial New Zealand – came to his defence. Regardless, Kereopa Te Rau was hanged in Napier Prison. But even a century and a half later, the events have not been laid to rest. Peter Wells travels back into an antipodean heart of darkness and illuminates how we try to make sense of the past, how we heal, remember – and forget.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe land is our history : indigeneity, law, and the settler state / Miranda Johnson.
The Land Is Our History tells the story of indigenous legal activism at a critical political and cultural juncture in Australia, Canada, and New Zealand. In the late 1960s, indigenous activists protested assimilation policies and the usurpation of their lands as a new mining boom took off, radically threatening their collective identities. Often excluded from legal recourse in the past, indigenous leaders took their claims to court with remarkable results… Miranda Johnson examines how indigenous peoples advocated for themselves in courts and commissions of inquiry between the early 1970s to the mid-1990s, chronicling an extraordinary and overlooked history in which virtually disenfranchised peoples forced powerful settler democracies to reckon with their demands. … Fracturing national myths and making new stories of origin necessary, indigenous peoples’ claims challenged settler societies to rethink their sense of belonging.” (Syndetics summary)
Chap. 5. Making a “Partnerhsip between races” : Māori activism and the Treaty of Waitangi.
Chap. 6. The Pacific way. (Aspects of the Whanganui river claim)

Toiapiapi : He huinga o ngā kura pūoro a te Māori = a collection of Māori musical treasures / Hirini Melbourne ; with an introduction by Richard Nunns.
“This 25th anniversary edition contains notes on traditional Maori instruments and lyrics. In Maori and English. Accompanied with a CD and includes an introduction from Richard Nunns. Originally published in 1991”–Publisher information.

Decolonisation in Aotearoa : education, research and practice / edited by Jessica Hutchings and Jenny Lee-Morgan.“This book examines decolonisation and Māori education in Aotearoa New Zealand in ways that seek to challenge, unsettle and provoke for change. Editors Jessica Hutchings and Jenny Lee-Morgan have drawn together leading Māori writers and intellectuals on topics that are at the heart of a decolonising education agenda, from tribal education initiatives to media issues, food sovereignty, wellbeing, Christianity, tikanga and more.”–Back cover.
Writers: Ranginui Walker, Moana Jackson, Ani Mikaere, Sarah-Jane Tiakiwai, Jenny Lee-Morgan, Takawai Murphy, Veronica Tawhai, Leonie Pihama, Mera Lee-Penehira, Āneta Hinemihi Rāwiri, Naomi Simmonds, Kirsten Gabel, Jo Smith, Jessica Hutchings, Ngahuia Murphy, Debbie Broughton.

Syndetics book coverNew Zealand’s rivers : an environmental history / Catherine Knight.
“‘New Zealand s Rivers: An environmental history’ explores the relationship between New Zealanders and their rivers, explaining how they have arrived at a crisis point, where fresh water has become their most contested resource and many rivers are too polluted to swim in. Environmental historian Catherine Knight reveals that the tension between exploitation and enjoyment of rivers is not new. Rivers were treasured by Maori as food baskets and revered as the dwelling places of supernatural creatures. But following European settlement, they became drains for mining, industrial waste and sewage, and were harnessed to generate power and to irrigate farmland. Over time, the utilitarian view of rivers has been increasingly questioned by those who value rivers for recreation as well as for ecological, spiritual and cultural reasons. Today, the sustainable use of rivers is the subject of intense debate. Thoroughly researched and richly illustrated, ‘New Zealand s Rivers’ is an accessible and compelling read for all New Zealanders, including anglers, kayakers, farmers, environmental practitioners, policy-makers, students and anyone with an interest in our environment and history.” (Syndetics summary)
Chap. 2. Māori and awa.
Chap. 11. Asserting mana over rivers.

Syndetics book coverCultural safety in Aotearoa New Zealand / edited by Dianne Wepa.
“In this second edition of Cultural Safety in Aotearoa New Zealand, editor Dianne Wepa presents a range of theoretical and practice-based perspectives adopted by experienced educators who are active in cultural safety education. Thoroughly revised to incorporate the latest methods and research, this edition reflects updates in government policies and nursing practices, and features new chapters on ethical considerations when working cross-culturally, as well as the legislative requirements of the Nursing Council of New Zealand. Each chapter includes key terms and concepts, practice examples providing content from healthcare workers’ everyday experiences, reflective questions to encourage the assimilation of ideas into practice, and references to allow further exploration of the issues discussed. Cultural Safety in Aotearoa New Zealand will equip students, tutors, managers, policy analysts and others involved in the delivery of healthcare with the tools to acknowledge the importance of cultural difference in achieving health and well-being in diverse communities.” (Syndetics summary)
p. 5 Towards cultural safety by Irihapeti Ramsden.
p. 65 Culture and ethnicity : what is the question? by Dianne Wepa.
p. 79 Te Tiriti o Waitangi/Treaty of Waitangi 1840 : its influence on health practice by Denise Wilson and Riripeti Haretuku.
p. 177 Midwifery practice by Katarina Jean Te Huia (including: traditional Māori birthing ; colonisation of Māori birth practices ; the situation today)
p. 235 Māori health : Māori- and whānau-centred practice by Denise Wilson and Huhana Hickey.
p. 252 Nursing and working with disability by Huhana Hickey (includes Māori/indigenous disability identity).

Journal of Pacific archaeology ; vol. 7, no. 2 (2016)
P. 26. Finding meaning and identitiy in New Zealand buildings archaeology : the example of “Parihaka” house, Dunedin by Peter Petchey & Sean Brosnahan.
p. 43. TheTawhiao cottage and the archaeology of race and ethnicity by Matthew Campbell.
p. 59. The source, composition and typology of ‘limestone’ adzes from eastern North Island, New Zealand by Phillip R. Moore & Campbell S. Nelson.
p. 59. Ecological consequences of pre-contact harvesting of Bay of Island fish and shellfish, and other marine taxa, based on midden evidence by John D. Booth.

New Zealand journal of history ; vol. 50, no. 2 (October, 2016)
p. 44. The New Zealand Government’s niupepa and their demise by Lachy Paterson.
p. 68. The politics of history and Waikato-Tainui’s raupatu treaty settlement by Martin Fisher.

Journal of New Zealand literature ; no. 34.1 (2016)
p. 143. Bones rolling under a river : poetry, history and politics in Bill Sewell’s The ballad of fifty-one and Robert Sullivan’s Cassino : city of martyrs/Citta Matire by Airini Beautrais.
p. 207. The Urewera notebook by Katherine Mansfield ; edited by Anna Plumridge / reviewed by Janet Wilson.

Whenua : stories of the land

Three books this month give us snippets and stories of the land.  There is the walking tour of 200 sites throughout New Zealand, a story of the gifting of Lake Wairarapa, along with the background environmental, archaeological “moulding of its landscape”, and then the account of the settlement and development of Hokowhitu in Palmerston North.  A fascinating special issue of NZJES discusses Kaupapa Māori.

Syndetics book coverExploring Aotearoa : short walks to reveal the Māori landscape / Peter Janssen.
“A walking guide containing around 200 short walks that explore Māori features of the landscape”–Publisher information.
“Author Peter Janssen has researched the fascinating background to each site, drawing on Māori oral and written history to relate the creation myths, battle scenes, momentous events and cultural detail underlying these sites”–Back cover

Syndetics book coverWairarapa Moana : the lake and its people / general editor: Ian F. Grant.
“Wairarapa Moana tells the story of the North Island’s largest lake complex from the mists of Māori myths to the realities of today’s environmental problems. Thirteen contributors … have written about Māori and Pākehā history, the area’s archaeology and the moulding of its landscape , the control of water in Wairarapa Moana’s complex of lakes, rivers and wetlands, about the diverse and sometimes rare fauna and flora, and about the clashes between European farming and Māori cultural values. Most significantly, there is also the little known saga of the Māori gifting of Lake Wairarapa to the Crown in 1896, the subsequent trail of broken promises and deceit until, finally, the people of Wairarapa Moana triumphed with their successful development of the Pouākani lands in the Waikato”–back cover

Hokowhitu : the story of settlement and development / Garry O’Neill.“Hokowhitu tells the story of settlement in pre-European times, and the reserve land retained by the Rangitāne when the Government purchased Te Ahu-a-Turanga block of land in 1864. As the township of Palmerston North developed the Māori Reserve was subdivided ito seven blocks and allocated to the principal families of the Rangitāne. Each family negotiated the rights to mill the trees”–Preface, p. 4.

Syndetics book coverMatiatia : gateway to Waiheke / Paul Monin.“Understanding the past is crucial to the decisions being made today. Waiheke historian Paul Monin tells the story of Matiatia from occupation at the time of the first Maori settlement of Aotearoa to the present day.”–back cover.

Archaeology in New Zealand ; vol. 55, no. 4 (December 2012)
p. 243. Whenua tuku iho : managing an ancestral archaeological landscape ; Ōtakanini Tōpū, South Kaipara Peninsula by Vanessa Tanner, Leah McCurdy and Malcolm Paterson.
p. 258. Investigation of Māori ovens on the old Lyttelton waterfront by (M36/229) by Andy Dodd.

New Zealand journal of educational studies ; vol . 47, no. 2 (2012)
Special issue: He aha te kaupapa? Critical conversations in kaupapa Māori ; edited by Te Kawehau Hoskins and Alison Jones.
p. 10. Interview : Kaupapa Māori : the dangers of domestication by Graham Smith.
p. 21. Interview : Kaupapa Māori : shifting the social by Mason Durie.
p. 30. Politics and knowledge : kaupapa Māori and mātauranga Māori by Te Ahukaramū Charles Royal.
p. 38. Pretty difficult : implementing kaupapa Māori theory in English-medium secondary schools by Russell Bishop.
p. 51. Achievements, orthodoxies and science in kaupapa Māori schooling by Georgina M. Stewart.
p. 64. Kaupapa Māori research : epistemic wilderness as freedom? by Garrick Cooper.
p. 74. Making sense of kaupapa Māori : a linguistic point of view by Peter J. Keegan.
p.85. A fine risk : ethics in kaupapa Māori politics by Te Kawehau Hoskins.
p. 100. Dangerous liaisons : Pākehā, kaupapa Māori, and educational research by Alison Jones.

Otaki historical journal ; vol. 34 (2012)
p. 10. James Cootes : whaler by Sonia Kellett. (James was the husband of Waitaoro Te Kanawa, Ngāti Toa)
p. 32. Hira Royal : mother, and leader of her people by Rose Monk.
p. 59. Old Maori college photographs.
p. 63. Music and gardening a way of life for Paddy Rikihana by Queenie Rikihana-Hyland.