Wāhine, whakairo, whakaora reo.

Here are two beautifully illustrated volumes of art – one reveals an all-embracing Polynesian concept of atua with the underpinning spiritual world, the other describes the whakapapa of Ngāti Porou carvings.
On a different note – there’s a huge landscaping of the history of New Zealand women.

Language endangerment in the 21st century : globalisation, technology and new media : proceedings of the Conference FEL XVI, 12-15 September 2012, AUT University, Auckland, Aotearoa/New Zealand / editors Tania Kaʻai … [et al.]
Presenters include: Tania Kaʻai, Muiris Ó Laoire & Nicholas Ostler — Tīmoti Kāretu — Hinematau McNeill — Rachael Kaʻai-Mahuta — Hana O’Regan — Ruth Lysaght — Michael Walsh — John Moorfield — Peter Keegan, Catherine Watson, Jeanette King, Margaret Maclagan & Ray Harlow — Katerina Naitoro — Tania Kaʻai & Dean Mahuta — Elisa Duder — Paora Mato, Te Taka Keegan, Daniel Cunliffe, Tara Dalley — Lidu Gong — Paora Mato — Kevin Scannell.

He W’akaputanga Mai o te Rangatiratanga : a proclamation.
“This publication represents a culmination of material made available, or created for the Hokianga Maori artists group exhibition ; He Wakaputanga Mai o te Rangatiranga – A proclamation. The exhibition was organised and first presented by black space gallery in Kohukohu, February 1-28, 2014… [Includes] “educational information alongside works and thoughts of Hokianga Maori artists: Maureen Lander ; Toi Te Rito Maihi, Heiwari Johnson, claire Kaahu White, Michelle Morunga, Bev Wilson, Urikore Ngakuru, Heather Randerson, Henare Rawiri, Emere Te Paea Robson, John Morunga, Stacey Noel, Maki Herbert.”

Syndetics book coverA history of New Zealand women / Barbara Brookes.
“This major new history of New Zealand ¿ written from the perspective of the women who have lived here ¿ will be released on Monday 15 February, launching at a conference held in honour of the author (leading New Zealand historian Barbara Brookes) at Otago University.” (Syndetics summary)
Incomplete contents: Origins, traditions and ‘civilisation’ before, 1814 — A civilising mission, 1814-1856 — Settling pākehā families unsettling whānau, 1850s-1860s — War, gold and dispossession, 1860s-1880s — The quest for citizenship, 1885-1890s — New expectations for a new century, 1900-1919 — Motherhood, mortality and a voice for women in the interwar years, 1919-1940 — The ‘modern woman’ of the interwar years, 1919-1940 — On the home front, 1939-1951 — Suburbia, 1950s-1960s — Decade of discovery, 1967-1977 — Into the corridors of power, 1977-1986 — Reckoning with women, 1984-1990s — Shaping the new millennium, 2000-2015.

Syndetics book coverAtua : sacred gods from Polynesia / Michael Gunn.The Polynesian concept of atua — of gods, figurative objects and associated beliefs — developed over thousands of years and spread throughout the region… Across central and eastern Polynesia, from the Cook, Austral, Society and Marquesas islands, the Tuamotu Archipelago, Tahiti, Rapa Nui, the Hawaiian Islands and Aotearoa New Zealand, unique, yet coherent, societies developed. With that a complex and sustaining spiritual world came into being… Among the atua were the deified spirits of human ancestors, particularly those famous for their invincibility, political strength or navigation skill. Polynesians created, revered and communicated with their atua in a relationship of profound intimacy. This way of life suffered a violent rupture with the arrival of Christianity in the 18th century…. ” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverA whakapapa of tradition : 100 years of Ngāti Porou carving, 1830-1930 / Ngarino Ellis ; with new photography by Natalie Robertson.
“From the emergence of the chapel and the wharenui in the nineteenth century to the rejuvenation of carving by Apirana Ngata in the 1920s, Maori carving went through a rapid evolution from 1830 to 1930. Focusing on thirty meeting houses, Ngarino Ellis tells the story of Ngati Porou carving and a profound transformation in Maori art. Beginning around 1830, three previously dominant art traditions – waka taua (war canoes), pataka (decorated storehouses) and whare rangatira (chief’s houses) – declined and were replaced by whare karakia (churches), whare whakairo (decorated meeting houses) and wharekai (dining halls)… Iwirakau is credited for reinvigorating the art of carving in the Waiapu region. The six major carvers of his school went on to create more than thirty important meeting houses and other structures. During this transformational period, carvers and patrons re-negotiated key concepts such as tikanga (tradition), tapu (sacredness) and mana (power, authority) – embedding them within the new architectural forms whilst preserving rituals surrounding the creation and use of buildings… This book is both a major study of Ngati Porou carving and an attempt to make sense of Maori art history. ” (Syndetics summary)

Te matau a Māui : fishhooks, fishing and fisheries in New Zealand / Chris Paulin with Mark Fenwick.
“”Te Matau a Maui discusses the form and function of the traditional Maori fishhook, customary fishing, and development of commercial fishing in New Zealand since European settlement (including the adoption of the rotating hook design as a re-discovery of the innovative and highly effective Maori hook design by present day commercial long-line fisheries), and changes in Maori lifestyle associated with the increasing availability of European agricultural cultivars and domestic animals in the nineteenth century, and urbanisation in the twentieth century that led to a decline in Maori fishing activity and the loss of indigenous knowledge”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)

Missionaries, education, arts, media, politics : as usual a broad range of subjects touching on Te Ao Māori.

Syndetics book coverMāori art : history, architecture, landscape and theory / Rangihiroa Panoho ; with photographs by Mark Adams & Haruhiko Sameshima.
“Up until now books on Maori art have described the work as either traditional (carving, weaving, painting) or contemporary, work produced post-1950s. This book presents a unique focus on Maori art by exploring the connection between the traditional and contemporary, and the place of Maori art within an international context. Maori Art provides a framework for looking at Maori art in a new way and fills a gap in Maori art history – while there are myriad surveys of Maori art there is currently very little critical writing on Maori art and artists”….(Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverHeke-nuku-mai-nga-iwi Busby : not here by chance / Jeff Evans.
“This biography of Heke-nuku-mai-nga-iwi Busby brings together the varied life experiences that have made Hec Busby the master waka builder, waka expert, celestial navigator and highly regarded Te Rarawa elder that he is today. He is one of the few active waka taua builders and is responsible for the completion of more than a dozen of these waka for iwi around the country… His entrepreneurial and leadership skills along with his tribal and tikanga knowledge have led to his involvement in iwi activities as well as in organising Waitangi commemorations, kapa haka, ocean-going voyages, and waka wananga to pass on his knowledge to the next generation.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe good doctor : breaking the rules, making a difference / Lance O’Sullivan with Margie Thomson.
“Lance O’Sullivan is a man on a mission. Raised in Auckland by a solo mother, he had a modest upbringing typical of the time, if one chequered with difficulties. After being expelled from two schools, Lance could have gone off the rails. Instead, he found his way at Hato Petera College, connecting with his Māori ancestry, and going on to study medicine… For his work, Lance has been acknowledged as a Sir Peter Blake Emerging Leader, Public Health Champion, Māori of the Year and, most recently, Kiwibank New Zealander of the Year. Passionate, brave and free-thinking, Lance stood up when no one else would…”–Publisher information.

Syndetics book coverTauira : Māori methods of learning and teaching / Joan Metge.Based on extensive interviews, this book offers a window on a mid-twentieth-century rural Māori world as described by those who grew up there. Metge’s work tackles important questions about Māori teaching and learning of this period. What was the role of whānau and hapū, household and marae, kaumātua and siblings, work and play? How much learning was practical and how much by teaching?”–Publisher information. Includes bibliographical references and index.
Contents: Chapter 1: Voices from the Past — Chapter 2: Learning as Part of Living — Chapter 3: Teaching and Learning — Chapter 4: Spirituality and Values — Chapter 5: Learning in Maturity as Part of Living — Chapter 6: Storehouses of Knowledge — Chapter 7: Wānanga — Chapter 8: Storytelling — Chapter 9: Learning in the School System — Chapter 10: Educational Practices and Principles.

Syndetics book coverAt the margin of Empire : John Webster and Hokianga, 1841-1900 / Jennifer Ashton.
“Born in Scotland in 1818, John Webster came in New Zealand via Australia in 1841 after narrowly escaping death in the outback following a violent encounter with a group of Aboriginal men. He spent most of the rest of his life in the Hokianga region, carving out a fortune as the region’s leading timber trader and cultivating connections with the leading political figures of the day… Webster was also engaged with Pākehā and the Crown – friends with Frederick Maning, visited by George Grey, Richard Seddon and others… Ashton argues that through his daily interactions, Webster helped slowly shift the balance of power in the North: the credit that he extended to his customers and kin saw them selling land to pay debts, helping push Māori into economic dependence”–Publisher information.

Syndetics book coverEntanglements of empire : missionaries, Māori, and the question of the body / Tony Ballantyne.
“The first Protestant mission to New Zealand, established in 1814, saw the beginning of complex political, cultural, and economic entanglements with Maori. ENTANGLEMENTS OF EMPIRE is a deft reconstruction of the cross-cultural translations of this early period… Maori and missionaries struggled over issues of hygiene, tattooing, clothing, and sexual morality and missionaries found it was difficult to maintain their own practices because of their dependence on Maori chiefly patrons as well as the material constraints and social conflicts. ….” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverPanguru and the city : kāinga tahi, kāinga rua : an urban migration history / Melissa Matutina Williams.
“Travelling from Hokianga to Auckland in the middle decades of the twentieth century, the people of Panguru established themselves in the workplaces, suburbs, churches and schools of the city. Melissa Matutina Williams writes from the heart of these communities. The daughter of a Panguru family growing up in Auckland, she writes a perceptive account of urban migration through the stories of the Panguru migrants. Through these vibrant oral narratives, the history of Maori migration is relocated to the tribal and whanau context in which it occurred. For the people of Panguru, migration was seldom viewed as a one-way journey of new beginnings; it was experienced as a lifelong process of developing a ‘co-existent home place’ for themselves and future generations. Dreams of a brighter future drew on the cultural foundations of a tribal homeland and past. PANGURU AND THE CITY: HE KAINGA RUA traces their negotiations with people and places, from Auckland’s inner-city boarding houses, places of worship and dance halls to workplaces and Maori Affairs’ homes in the suburbs. It is a history that will resonate with Maori from all tribal areas who shared in the quiet task of working against state policies of assimilation, the economic challenges of the 1970s and neoliberal policies of the 1980s in order to develop dynamic Maori community sites and networks which often remained invisible in the cities of Aotearoa New Zealand.” (Syndetics summary)

The brown book : Māori in screen production / written by Dr. Ella Henry and Melissa Wikaire. Contents include: Origins of the Brown Book ; Māori and the screen industry ; working with Māori in screen production ;
Appendices: Māori society ; an overview ; Ngā Aho Whakaari executive members ; Māori production companies ‘ Māori iwi radio stations ‘ pan-tribal organisations ; screen industry organisations ; television broadcasters.

Māori carving : the art of recording Māori history / contributing writers, Malcolm Mulholland and Robyn Bargh.
“This photograph-rich book shows and describes the process of carving, covering the types of materials and tools used, the carving strokes and surface patterns and different regional styles. It shows the range of items carved from meeting houses to musical instruments, waka or canoes, storehouses, weapons and ceremonial items, such as boxes and staffs, and gives detailed information on the carving of wharenui or meeting houses – the epitome of the carver’s art. Information is given on how to read and understand a carving, looking in depth at parts of carvings and what to look for in elements such as the head, arms and hands of figures and the surface patterns used. The patterns and body styles are described and accompanied by detailed photographs that make identification of the elements easy. This is part of a series of four books on aspects of Maōri culture. The others are: Geothermal Treasures: Māori Living with Heat and Steam; Māori Weaving: The Art of Creating Māori Textiles; and Marae: The Heart of Māori Culture”–Publisher information.

Māori weaving : the art of creating Māori textiles / contributing writers, Vanessa Bidois, Cherie Taylor and Robyn Bargh.
“”Since their ancestors arrived in Aotearoa New Zealand and discovered the useful properties of harakeke (New Zealand flax), Maori have used flax leaves to create baskets, mats, housing materials, clothing and cords, ropes and fishing nets. In weaving and the patterns used, Maori record their histories and stories, passing on their culture, genealogy, values and beliefs, weaving together people and communities”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)

Marae : the heart of Māori culture / contributing writers, Malcolm Mulholland and Robyn Bargh.
“”Step-by-step guide to a powhiri, or welcome ceremony, showing and describing what happens, the people involved, what they do, and the values and understandings underpinning the ceremony. There is also a close look at the outside and inside of a wharenui, or meeting house, showing each of the elements and features that make it up. Maori cultural concepts are explained and discussed and a glossary of Maori terms is provided”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)

Geothermal treasures : Māori living with heat and steam / contributing writers, Vanessa Bidois, Cherie Taylor and Robyn Bargh.
“”Natural geothermal phenomena – geysers, hot springs and mud pools – have drawn people to the thermal region of New Zealand for years. Locals and tourists are captivated by the beauty and magic of bubbling mud, steam and hot water gushing from the earth. New Zealand’s world-class geothermal resource is a source of energy, a tourist attraction and a treasure of great historical, cultural, spiritual and economic importance for Maori. In this book, Maori traditional stories, understandings and history stand alongside geothermal science in an exploration of the thermal phenomena of the Volcanic Plateau. Beautiful photographs show the hot pools, rising steam, geysers, bubbling mud and thermal formations that visitors see, and the text provides information about the natural history of the area, its formation and its significance to Maori. This is part of a series of four books on aspects of Maori culture. The others are: Maori Carving: The Art of Preserving Maori History; Maori Weaving: The Art of Creating Maori Textiles; and Marae: The Heart of Maori Culture”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)

Lives of colonial objectives edited by Annabel Cooper, Lachy Paterson and Angela Wanhalla. Otago University Press, 2015.
p. 20. Intimate immensity : a pūtorino in the Peabody Essex Museum by Lucy Mackintosh.
p. 27. Te Haupapa by Pāoria Tapsell
p. 35. Voyaging taonga : the Kīngi tauihi by Kelvin Day.
p. 110. Retrieved from oblivion? Wiremu Kingi Te Rangitaake and the photographic object by Ruth Harvey.
p. 117. ‘A sparrow alone upon the house top’ : the Te Pihoihoi Press by Lachy Paterson.
p. 122. He rau mahara : te wananga ledger by Migoto Eria.
p. 129. Minute books : an integral part of the Māori Land Court by Paerau Warbrick.
p. 134. A road into Te Urewera by Annabel Cooper.
p. 170. Te Tokotoko by Megan Pōtiki.
p. 206. Katherine Mansfield’s hei tiki by Jane Stafford.
p. 212. Te pai o ngā āhua : the visitors’ books at the Lindauer Art Gallery by Roger Blackley.
p. 219. Toko toru tapu : a tale of four churches by Damian Skinner,
p. 231. Māori monument or Pākehā propaganda? the memorial to Keepa Te Rangihiwinui, Whanganui by Ewan Morris.
p. 253. ‘Pōua’s cloak’ : the Haberield family kahu kiwi by Michael J. Stevens.
p. 311. Aferword : ther wharenui Mataatua, and some thoughts about things by Conal McCarthy and Jonathan Mane-Wheoki.

New Zealand government and politics edited by Janine Hayward. 6th ed. OUP, 2015.
p. 4. Māori political history 1860-1960 by Michael J. Stevens.
p. 84. Marxism by Evan Te Ahu Poata-Smith.
p. 240. The Māori Party by Morgan Godfery.
p. 300. The Māori seats by Maria Bargh.
p. 511. Youth engagement by Veronica M. H. Tawhai.

Coutts, Brent and Nicholas Fitness. Protest in New Zealand. Pearson, 2013.
p. 83. Maori resistance to military service.
p. 171. Maori feminist issues

Overland ; issue 219 (Winter,2015)
Features: Anton Blank. Change is the only constant (on gay role models) ; Catriona MacLennan. The ethics of defence (layers and rape trials) ; Fiction: Tina Makereti. Monster ; Poetry: Editorial by Robert Sullivan ; Airini Beautrais. Flow ; Nicole Hawkins. Māori dux ; Reihana Robinson. Terra nullius ; Kiri Piahana-Wong. Hiding ; Apirana Taylor. thank you ; pukana .