Taiao, mahi toi, mahi ahuwhenua

My personal highlights this month cover three subjects: environmental history, a story of Te Aro Pā, and art books on weaving, a printmaker, and the wonderful work of Cliff Whiting.

Syndetics book coverNgā hurihanga ako kohungahunga = Transformative teaching practices in early childhood education / edited by Anne Grey and Beverley Clark.
“Ngā Hurihanga Ako Kōhungahunga – Transformative teaching practices in early childhood education introduces current innovations in early childhood education teaching practice in New Zealand and discusses various aspects of pedagogical practice in ways designed to both stimulate and inform the student of early childhood education. Inherently complex and involving many facets shaped by context, pedagogical practice in early childhood education is always evolving and subjective in nature. With this text the editors aim to engage the teacher/learner in recognising and responding to the complexity of good pedagogical practice, informing teacher choices about: philosophical approaches; decision making about curriculum; ethical approaches to relationship building; and interactions with children and their families.” (Back cover)

Mawhitiwhiti patterns and woven bags : a collection of mawhitiwhiti patterns and their use along with instructions for weaving string bags / Robin Hill.
“In NZ Maori weaving mawhitiwhiti is the diversion of the whenu, or warp threads, from the vertical to create different patterns. This booklet is designed to be used by those with a basic knowledge of weaving techniques.” (Abridged from Back cover)

Syndetics book coverMaking a new land : environmental histories of New Zealand / edited by Eric Pawson and Tom Brooking.
“Making a new land presents an interdisciplinary perspective on one of the most rapid extensive transformations in human history : that which followed Maori and then European colonisation of New Zealand’s temperate islands” (Back cover)
p. 35. A fragile plenty : pre-European Māori and the New Zealand environment by Atholl Anderson.
p. 52. Contesting resources : Māori, Pākehā and a tenurial revolution by Evelyn Stokes.
p. 293. Ngāi Tahu and the ‘nature’ of Māori modernity by Michael J. Stevens.

Syndetics book coverAhuwhenua : celebrating 80 years of Māori farming / Danny Keenan.
“I am not sure that many recognise what the impact of the systematic appropriation of Māori land had on the self-esteem, morale and natural instincts of Māori to manage and nurture their land. It was Ngata who started the renaissance Māori agriculture which had naturally flourished until the arrival of the first settlers the settlers and the Crown did not just take land from Māori, they took the best land and what was left was usually the least desirable and highly fragmented” (Abridged from foreword)

Hinehauone Coralie Cameron, printmaker / Gail Ross.
“Hinehauone known as Corrie Cameron grew up on a sheep farm in the Wairarapa. She trained as an artist in Wellington, London and Paris, and went on to create images of farmhands, horticultural workers, and landscapes which resonated with spirit of place” (Abridged from back cover)

Syndetics book coverCliff Whiting : he toi nuku, he toi rangi / Ian Christensen.
“This new book provides insights to the thinking, the work and the development of this remarkable artist who has made an outstanding contribution to the tradition of Maori art making and meeting house decoration, forging innovative techniques and practises, exploring new materials and forms, while at the same time maintaining essential elements of tradition, ensuring the relevancy of ‘beliefs, values and mana in today’s and tomorrow’s world.'” (Publisher description)

Twenty New Zealand playwrights / Michelanne Forster and Vivienne Plumb.
p. 34 Hone Kouka
p. 84 Briar Grace-Smith
p. 120 Renee

Playmarket 40 : 40 years of playwriting in New Zealand / edited by Laurie Atkinson with David O’Donnell (consulting editor).
p. 34 Mā te rēhia e kawe by John Huria
p. 88 Ko te kōrero te kai a te rangatira by Hone Kouka