Te Tiriti o Waitangi: Past, Present Future

Kia ora koutou! Here at He Kōrero o te Wā, we have some special events coming up for you. For three weeks we will have free lunchtime talks relating to Te Tiriti in Wellington.  The series kicks off on Tuesday 29 April, and will all be held at Wellington Central Library from 12.30-1.30:

Tuesday 29 April – Past: Te Tiriti signings, April/May 1840
Miria Pomare and Te Ati Awa Whānau.
Learn more about the wāhine and rangatira of Ngāti Toa and Te Atiawa who signed Te Tiriti.

Tuesday 6 May – Present: ‘Wai 262’ flora and fauna claim
Aroha Mead
Join with Aroha to unravel complexities of flora, fauna and taonga, including traditional knowledge and intellectual property rights over cultural ideas, design and language.

Tuesday 13 May – Future: Te Tiriti relationships: the way ahead
Kiritapu Allan, Hannah Northover and Fetu-ole-moana Tamapeau
Convenor: Jen Margaret (Wellington Treaty Network)
Hear a panel of speakers provide their perspectives on the future of Te Tiriti relationships.

Come along to expand your knowledge about Te Tiriti o Waitangi with reference to the past, the present and the future.

treatyb
Treaty of Waitangi. Dominion post (Newspaper) : Photographic negatives and prints of the Evening Post and Dominion newspapers. Ref: EP-Ethics-Waitangi Day and Treaty of Waitangi-03. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23090536

In the meantime, you can learn more with these books from our collection:

Syndetics book coverThe Treaty of Waitangi companion : Māori and Pākehā̄̄ from Tasman to today / edited by Vincent O’Malley, Bruce Stirling and Wally Penetito.
“Since the Treaty of Waitangi was signed by Maori chiefs and Governor Hobson in 1840 it has become the defining document in New Zealand history. From the New Zealand Wars to the 1975 Land March, from the Kingitanga to the Waitangi Tribunal, from Captain Cook to Hone Harawira, The Treaty of Waitangi Companion tells the story of the Treaty and Maori and Pakeha relations through the many voices of those who made this country’s history.Sourced from government publications and newspapers, letters and diaries, poems, paintings and cartoons, the Companion brings to life the long history of debates about the Treaty and life in Aotearoa.” (abridged from syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverKo Aotearoa tēnei : te taumata tuarua : a report into claims concerning New Zealand law and policy affecting Māori culture and identity.
“This report address the Wai 262 claim concerning New Zealand law and policy affecting Māori culture and identity. It is divided into two levels, a shorter summary layer subtitle “Te Taumata Tuatahi,” and a fuller, two-volume layer subtitled Te Taumata Tuarua.” (library catalogue)

Syndetics book coverThe story of a treaty / Claudia Orange.
“The Treaty of Waitangi is a central document in New Zealand history. This lively account tells the story of the Treaty from its signing in 1840 through the debates and struggles of the nineteenth century to the gathering political momentum of recent decades. The second edition of this popular book brings the story up to the present.” (library catalogue)

Syndetics book coverTreasured possessions : indigenous interventions into cultural and intellectual property / Haidy Geismar.
“On September 13, 2007, the United Nations adopted the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The document recognized collective property rights of tangible and intangible resources. Several decades before the declaration, indigenous peoples globally were employing cultural and intellectual property laws to assert claims to their cultural resources. Using two different Pacific nations, Vanuatu and New Zealand, Geismar explores the varying mechanisms employed by the Maori and indigenous people of Vanuatu in asserting intellectual and cultural property rights. This richly textured analysis details the intricate interplay of indigenous rights against the emerging body of laws. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. G. R. Campbell The University of MontanaCopyright American Library Association, used with permission.” (abridged from CHOICE)

Frontiers and Beyond

An interesting story this month, Frontiers, touches on the story of William Barnard Rhodes, his daughter, Mary Ann with her connections to local iwi, and her son William Barnard Rhodes-Moorhouse, airman in the first World War who was awarded a post-humous VC by the British Government.

Syndetics book coverFrontiers : a colonial dynasty / Simon Best.
“Two airmen of Māori descent lie buried together on a hilltop in Dorset, England. They are the grandson and great-grandson of a whaling captain who entered New Zealand waters in 1835, and who became one of the leading pioneers of European settlement in Wellington. … In 1883 the whaler’s natural daughter, her mother a local Māori, inherited her father’s wealth and moved with her husband to England, living in some of the country’s grand houses. Her eldest son became one of the world’s first aviators, winning a posthumous Victoria Cross over France in 1915. His son, also a noted pilot, was killed at the height of the Battle of Britain.” (Back cover)

He kete waiata = A basket of songs / [researchers, Rāhui Papa, Pānia Papa ; editors, Pānia Papa, Linda Te Aho].
“We have gathered together some of these taonga, building upon an earlier collection put together by Rose Tuineau and Irene Winikerei. We have added translations and explanations, and material learned at wānanga held over many years at Pōhara Pā and Maungatautari Marae, taught by Te Kaapo Clark and other kaumātua of Ngāti Korokī-Kahukura.” (He mihi, p. 3.)

A model for successful Maori learners in workplace settings : summary report / Cain Kerehoma … [et al.].
“This project was funded by the Ako Aotearoa National Project Fund as a Maori Initiative Project in 2010. The research was undertaken by Kahui Tautoko Consulting Ltd in collaboration with the Industry Training Federation (ITF), the New Zealand Motor Industry Training Organisation (Inc) (MITO), the Electrotechnology Industry Training Organisation (now the Skills Organisation) and the Building and Construction Industry Training Organisation (BCITO).” (Page two)

Kotiro Maori : piano transcriptions of 20 Maori songs / [arrangements by Keith Southern].
“E karangahia ; E tama ; E to matou matua ; Haere ra ; He wawata ; He tiki ; Karangatia ra ; Karo poi ; Kei reira ; Kotiro Maori ; Kuarongorongo ake ahau ; Me hoe tatou ; Mihi mai ra ; Naku te whare : Parihaka poi ; Ruriruri ; Te wairua ; Terina ; Waiata whai a ipo ; Whakarongo mai e nga iwi.” (Contents)

Pīata mai : our people, our places, our stories / [compiled by Ataraita Ngatai].
“Hinemotu Margaret Harawira — Tāhiwi Te Arihi — Gregory Gardiner — Māwete Gardiner — Taukiri Tawhiao — Quita Wheeler — Ira Pomana — Sylvia Kuka — Te Kuta Holland — Merania Nepia — Harry Cassidy — Amīria Cassidy — Tamahou Murray — Maata Dodd — Nessie Kuka — Terrence Hayes — Mākuini Hayes — Ātīria Ake — Tāwhairiri Murray — Harry Ngātai — Karauria Smith — Tirakitemoana Taylor — Irene McCaffery — Te Arakau Samuels — Arapera Nuku — Enoka Ngātai — Rangikahuia Pakaru — Te Huihui Jacob — Heeni Murray — Rosie Tukaki — Me mihi ki ā rātou mā — James Mikaere — Pīnao Tukaki — Ruamoana Tāwhiti — Background of Te Awanui Hauora Trust.” (Contents, page three)

Kahaki / nā Charisma Rangipunga.
“Ahakoa kei te haikura tonu a Wai, ko ia tēra e tiaki ana i ōna tēina tokorua, e kimi pūtea ana kia ora ai te whānau. He kaha te tautoko mai a tana hoa tāne a Tama i a ia. Pūmau tonu tō rāua aroha, tētahi ki tētahi. Nō te taenga atu o tētahi tauhou ki te tāone o Whiritoa, ka huri kōaro te ao o Wai. He tangata purotu, engari, he murare. He kaiwaiata, engari anō, he arero rua. Nā ngā mahi mūrere a te tauhou nei ka riro atu a Wai ki tōna taha. Nō te ao tawhito te kaupapa o tēnei pakimaero aroha, ā, kua tuhia kētia kia hāngai tonu ki te ao o ngā taiohi o nāianei.” (Back cover)
“This love story is a modern retelling of the traditional story of the taniwha Poutini, who kidnaps Waitāiki, the wife of Tamaahua. Rewritten to be relevant for young people today.” (Library catalogue

Syndetics book coverTreasured possessions : indigenous interventions into cultural and intellectual property / Haidy Geismar.
“On September 13, 2007, the United Nations adopted the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The document recognized collective property rights of tangible and intangible resources. Several decades before the declaration, indigenous peoples globally were employing cultural and intellectual property laws to assert claims to their cultural resources. Indigenous groups use these laws to challenge the expropriation of their lands, sacred places, religious practices, art, and symbols. cultural property rights. The assertion of indigenous rights and claims, embedded in property laws, are in the forefront in the assertion and reinforcement of indigenous sovereignty, self-determination, and cultural survival.” (CHOICE)

Ahunga Tikanga / [compiled and edited by Kim McBreen ; mihi by Heitia Raureti].“Ahunga Tikanga explores the foundation, creation, development and application of tikanga from a time prior to the arrival of another culture, through to today. The Ahunga Tikanga programme, formerly Māori laws and Philosophy, was first offered in 1987.” (Foreword)
P. 45-58. Discussion of waiata tangi: Tākiri ko te ata by Turupa.
P. 61. Māui and the moon-tides of Māori women by Ngāhuia Murphy.
p. 81. Kei hea nga manu by Te Wera Firmin.
p. 89. [Analysis of Wai 262 report] by Moana Jackson.

Te ukaipo.Te ukaipo 5. Published by Te Wānanga o Raukawa.
“Contents include writings by: Hēni Jacob, Manurere Devonshire, Ani Mikaere, Hēni Jacob, Hana Pōmare, Moko Morris, Alma Winiata-Kenny, Libby Hakaraia and topics include reflections on Whakatupuranga Rua Mano, Evelyn Kereama, Kahe Te Rauoterangi, taewa, and broadcasting, and the influential lives of Hapai and Emma Winiata.”

Ture, tika, mana tangata, mana ā-iwi

We now have a result for the Wai 262 (concerning New Zealand law and policy affecting Maori culture and identity) claim filed in October 1991 by Saana Murray (Ngati Kuri), Del Wihongi (Te Rarawa), John Hippolite (Ngati Koata), Tama Poata (Te-Whanau-o-Ruataupare), and Witi McMath (Ngati Wai). All of these claimants have now passed on. Included in our recent picks this month is the Waitangi Tribunal’s report, plus much more. Have a browse!

Syndetics book coverKo Aotearoa tēnei : te taumata tuarua : a report into claims concerning New Zealand law and policy affecting Māori culture and identity.
“This three volume report addresses the Wai 262 claim concerning law and policy affecting Māori culture and identity, intellectual property in ‘taonga works’, Māori interests in genetic and biological resources in indigenous flora and fauna, Māori involvement in decision-making on resource management and conservation, Crown support for te reo Māori, Crown control of mātauranga Māori, and rongoa Māori and Māori input into NZ’s positions on international instruments”–back cover.

Syndetics book coverColonising myths–Māori realities : he rukuruku whakaaro / Ani Mikaere. “This collection of papers reflect on the impact of Pākehā law and values on Māori legal thought and practice. They discuss issues such as the illogicality of seeking justice for Māori within the confines of the coloniser’s law ; the need for Pākehā to confront the implications of their position as inheritors of the spoils of colonisation ; the myths that have been constructed to obscure the true nature of the Crown-Pākehā relationship as established in 1840 ; the insideous effect of Pākehā thought on Māori conceptions of reality ; and the importance of reinstating tikanga at the heart of Māori thinking”–back cover.

Syndetics book coverKura koiwi = Bone treasures / Brian Flintoff.
“Both a personal account of Brian Flintoff’s career as a bone carver, and an important exploration of Maori art and bone carving. Heavily illustrated with exquisite examples of his, and other people’s work, this book explains the mythology and symbolism behind his work … a sister publication to Taonga pūoro : singing treasures…. “–Cover.

Syndetics book coverNgā tini whetū : navigating Māori futures / Mason Durie.
“This book describes Māori journeys as voyages towards the future, within a changing seascape and a search for new destinations to reach preferred landings where passages are illuminated ; not necessarily by celestial lights but by pointers that can bring lucidity to murky waters”–adapted from intro. p. 1.
This sequel to “Ngā kāhui pou” contains twenty-five papers from conferences, 2004-2010, under four headings – “indigenous development”, “Māori development”, “Health”, “Paerangi Lectures”.

Syndetics book coverKimble Bent, malcontent : the wild adventures of a runaway soldier in old-time New Zealand : a graphic novel / by Chris Grosz.
“A retelling of Cowans book, Kimble Bent: Malcontent vividly portrays Bent’s life as a Pakeha Maori, his assimilation into tribal life, his view of Hauhau war rites. Bent witnessed some of the fiercest battles of the New Zealand wars, including Te Ngutu o te Manu and Tauranga-ika, and was acquainted with such legendary personalities, as Titokowaru and Te Whiti. He was there when von Tempsky was slain.”–adapted from randomhouse.co.nz

Syndetics book coverAncient wisdom modern solutions : the inspirational story of one man’s quest to become a modern day warrior / Ngahihi o te ra Bidois.
“The story of Ngahi’s painfully journey records the highs and lows as he joined unemployment ranks to relearn the language he’d once spurned. He describes his reconnection with his Māori heritage and a life-changing decision to receive the gift of ta moko from his ancestors. Along the way, his struggles to reclaim his identity and embrace the rich culture of his people taught him many valuable lessons – which he believes resonate with us all”– based on back cover.