Pukapuka hou: Kōanga, 2017 (New books: Spring 2017)

Wellington City Libraries now holds Cyrus Hingston’s Pou o Whakaue: marae of Whakaue, and we look forward to the arrival of his companion book, Pou o Ue. Rangi Matamua published Matariki the star of the year, and we welcome now the reo Māori edition, Matariki: te whetū tapu o te tau. Finally, some very interesting thoughts on kaupapa Māori by a collection of of our favourite authors and scholars.

Pou o Whakaue : marae of Whakaue / Cyrus Gregory Tauahika Hingston.
Pou o Whakaue is a history of eight marae of Whakaue – the tupuna, the whenua, the whare, the tangata whenua and their memories of the marae, the relationships to the ancestor Whakaue and Te Arawa whanui.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverCritical conversations in kaupapa Māori / edited by Te Kawehau Hoskins and Alison Jones.
“Kaupapa Māori theory and methodology developed over twenty years ago and have since become influential in social research, practice and policy areas. The collection contains chapters by Brad Coombes, Garrick Cooper, Mason Durie, Carl Mika, Te Ahukaramū Charles Royal, Graham Hingangaroa Smith, Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Alice Te Punga Somerville, Georgina Stewart and Tamasailau Suaalii-Sauni, along with the collection editors.” (Publisher information)

Syndetics book coverMatariki : te whetū tapu o te tau / Rangi Matamua.
“In midwinter, Matariki rises in the pre-dawn sky, and its observation is celebrated with incantations on hilltops at dawn, balls, exhibitions, dinners and a vast number of events. The Matariki tradition has been re-established, and its regeneration coincides with a growing interest in Māori astronomy. Still, there remain some unanswered questions about how Matariki was traditionally observed. What is Matariki? Why did Māori observe Matariki? How did Māori traditionally celebrate Matariki? When and how should Matariki be celebrated? This book seeks answers to these questions and explores what Matariki was in a traditional sense so it can be understood and clebrated in our modern society.” (Back cover)

Image from VUPInternational indigenous rights in Aotearoa New Zealand / edited by Andrew Erueti.
“Over the past four decades, international indigenous rights have become a prominent aspect of international law and are now enshrined in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Yet, while endorsed by Aotearoa New Zealand in 2010, little remains known about how these standards came about, how the international movement that created them was established, and the implications of these standards on national reforms already protecting Māori rights. International Indigenous Rights in Aotearoa New Zealand seeks to answer these questions.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverJuridical encounters : Māori and the colonial courts, 1840-1852 / Shaunnagh Dorsett
“From 1840 to 1852, the Crown Colony period, the British attempted to impose their own law on New Zealand. In theory Maori, as subjects of the Queen, were to be ruled by British law. But in fact, outside the small, isolated, British settlements, most Maori and many settlers lived according to tikanga … Shaunnagh Dorsett examines the shape that exceptional laws took in New Zealand, the ways they influenced institutional design and the engagement of Maori with those new institutions, particularly through the lowest courts in the land.” (Syndetics summary)

By their fruits you will know them : early Māori leaders in the Mormon Church. Volume 2 / edited by Selwyn Katene.
“This book follows ‘Turning the Hearts of the Children’, exploring why so many Māori in the 1880s were inspired to question the mainstream churches and flock to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, the Mormon church.” (Book jacket)

Syndetics book coverHuia short stories. 12 : contemporary Māori fiction.
“Here are the best short stories and novel extracts from the Pikihuia Awards for Māori writers 2017 as judged by Whiti Hereaka, Paula Morris, Poia Rewi amd Rawinia Higgins. The book contains the stories from the finalists for Best Short Story written in English, Best Short Story written in te reo Māori and Best Novel Extract categories.” (Provided by publisher)

Syndetics book coverThese two hands : a memoir / Renée.
“Renee Paule lives in Otaki and teaches her Your Life, Your Story and her Poem a Week workshops there. This is just one version of her life, her story, told in patches, like a quilt.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe fuse box : essays on writing from Victoria University’s International Institute of Modern Letters / edited by Emily Perkins and Chris Price.
“From Victoria University’s International Institute of Modern Letters, The Fuse Box offers writing strategies and guidance on keeping the faith from some of our best writers. Starting with the instigating spark, through to currents and connections, these essays shine a light on the creative process. They explore what to write about and how to get started, how to keep the flow going over time, freedom and constraint, how your writing might meet the world, and how to make the most of accidents. Poets, dramatists, novelists and writing teachers open up to reveal their wiring in essays that are strikingly honest, political and playful.” (Syndetics summary)
p. 91. The story that matters by Tina Makereti.
p. 204. Patricia Grace : an interview with Briar Grace-Smith

Syndetics book coverNew Zealand between the wars / edited by Rachael Bell.
“If World War One was the crucible that forged an independent New Zealand identity, then the two decades following are surely the years in which the foundation for the new nation was laid. In shedding the last vestiges of colonial society in exchange for the trappings of a modern democratic nation, the 1920s and 1930s in New Zealand set a blueprint for state intervention and assistance that remained unchallenged for the next 50 years.” (Syndetics summary)
Chap. 5. Once were muttonbirders: Ngāti Kuia’s flight to retain its Tītī harvesting rights by Peter Meihana.

He kōanga tangata tahi

Exploration, heritage and kōrero nehe – these are topics amongst the new books for He Kohikohinga Māori, Mahuru, 2017.

Syndetics book coverLaunching Marsden’s mission : the beginnings of the Church Missionary Society in New Zealand, viewed from New South Wales / eds. Peter G. Bolt & David B. Pettett.
“In 1794 the Rev Samuel Marsden became the second Chaplain to the Colony of New South Wales. Both Marsden and the first Chaplain, the Rev Richard Johnson, came to the Colony under the sponsorship of the Church of England Evangelicals. They had high hopes that New South Wales would be the base from which the ‘everlasting gospel’ would sound forth to achieve the salvation of the ‘poor benighted heathens’ of the South Seas. To this end Marsden began the mission to New Zealand on Christmas Day, 1814… This book is a celebration of that mission and Marsden’s preparations for it.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTears of Rangi : experiments across worlds / Anne Salmond.
“Six centuries ago Polynesian explorers, who inhabited a cosmos in which islands sailed across the sea and stars across the sky, arrived in Aotearoa New Zealand where they rapidly adapted to new plants, animals, landscapes and climatic conditions. In this, her most ambitious book to date, Dame Anne Salmond looks at New Zealand as a site of cosmo-diversity, a place where multiple worlds engage and collide. Like our ancestors, Anne Salmond suggests, we too may have a chance to experiment across worlds.” (Syndetics summary)

Tuai : a traveller in two worlds / Alison Jones & Kuni Kaa Jenkins.
“A thrilling biographical narrative of a young Bay of Islands leader who grew up in the Māori world of the early nineteenth century – and crossed the globe to encounter England in the midst of the industrial revolution. This is a story about the Māori discovery of England. These voyages between worlds represented risk and opportunity: Tuai chose opportunity, and the rest is history.” (Back cover)

Syndetics book coverTruth and beauty : verse biography in Canada, Australia and New Zealand / edited by Anna Jackson, Helen Rickerby, and Angelina Sbroma.
Truth and Beauty turns critical attention to an exciting genre that lies at the intersection of biography and poetry, narrative and lyric, history and the confessional. With essays on influential verse biographers Margaret Atwood, Dorothy Porter, Michael Ondaatje, Jennifer Maiden and Anne Carson along with newer practitioners including Chris Orsman, Jordie Albiston, Robert Sullivan, Tusiata Avia and Amy Brown, this collection looks at the inevitable tensions that arise between historical fact and the work of imagination – and the competing and complementary claims of truth and beauty.” (Syndetics summary)

Colonial Gothic to Māori renaissance : essays in memory of Jonathan Mane-Wheoki / edited by Conal McCarthy & Mark Stocker.

Syndetics book coverHistory, heritage, and colonialism : historical consciousness, Britishness, and cultural identity in New Zealand, 1870-1940 / Kynan Gentry.
History, heritage and colonialism offers an internationally relevant examination of the nexus between empire and colonial identity, by exploring the politics of history-making and interest in preserving the material remnants of the past in late nineteenth and early twentieth century colonial society… Offering important insights for societies negotiating the legacy of a colonial past in a global present, this book will be of particular value to all those concerned with museum, heritage, and tourism studies, and imperial history, at undergraduate and postgraduate level, as well as among scholars in these fields. It will also be of interest to a wider public interested in heritage and the history of museums.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverHe reo wāhine : Māori women’s voices from the nineteenth century / Lachy Paterson and Angela Wanhalla.
“During the nineteenth century, Maori women produced letters and memoirs, wrote off to newspapers and commissioners, appeared before commissions of enquiry, gave evidence in court cases, and went to the Native Land Court to assert their rights. He Reo Wahine is a bold new introduction to the experience of Maori women in colonial New Zealand through Maori women’s own words.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverAnimism : respecting the living world / Graham Harvey.
“Animism’ is now an important term for describing ways in which some people understand and engage respectfully with the larger-than-human world. Its central theme is our relationship with our other-than-human neighbours, such as animals, plants, rocks, and kettles, rooted in the understanding that the term ‘person’ includes more than humans. Graham Harvey explores the animist cultures of Native Americans, Maori, Aboriginal Australians and eco-Pagans, introducing their diversity and considering the linguistic, performative, ecological and activist implications of these different animisms.” (Syndetics summary)

Ngā pepeha o te takere nui / Anaha Hiini.
“Here is a collection of pepehā for marae in the rohe of Te Arawa waka.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverMāori at home : an everyday guide to learning the Māori language / Scotty and Stacey Morrison.
“An introduction to the Maori language… covers the basics of life in and around a typical Kiwi household- whether you’re practising sport, getting ready for school, celebrating a birthday, preparing a shopping list or relaxing at the beach, Maori at home gives you the words and phrases – and confidence – you need.” (Syndetics summary)

New Zealand geographic; September-October 2017
p. 26. Star struck by Leonie Hayden. The story of aerospace engineer: Mana Vautier (Te Arawa and Ngāti Kahungunu)
p. 46. When worlds collide by Leonie Hayden. The story of Ihumātao, on the shores of Manukau Harbour : Auckland’s oldest settlement now designated special housing area.