Tiriti Talks: Morgan Godfery — Te Arawhiti / Māori Crown Relations and the Tiriti

Nau mai, haere mai!  Wellington City Libraries are pleased to present the third of our free events to mark the signing of Te Tiriti o Waitangi in Te Whanganui-a-Tara that happened on the 29 April 1840

Where

The Hall, St John’s In The City
Cnr Willis & Dixon Streets (entrance on Dixon St)

When

Rātū / Tuesday  14 May  @  5.30-6.30 pm

About Morgan Godfery

Morgan Godfery has whakapapa links to Te Pahipoto hapū of Ngāti Awa, and Lalomanu of Hāmoa/Samoa.  He is a political writer (but not a member of any political party).

His strong commitment to issues affecting Māori has driven his weekly/daily  comments  on social media via his twitter account and e-Tangata. An earlier focus of his writing was his blog, Maui Street.

Although the blog is now inactive, there is an impressive list of his published work there.

Read Morgan Godfery on Bridget Williams Books

You can read two of Morgan’s works online — Māui Street and The Interregnum — through our Bridget Williams Books Text Collection subscription (log in with your library card at the links below to start reading):

Māui Street / Morgan Godfery (eBook)
“Morgan Godfery is one of New Zealand’s most energising young thinkers. In just a few years he has become a leading voice in the country’s social and political life. Starting out under his own banner, ‘Māui Street’, his writing now appears across national and international publications. This curated selection brings together the best of Godfery’s writing. Read together, the collection charts the emergence of a significant New Zealand voice.” (Bridget Williams Books)

The Interregnum / Morgan Godfery (eBook)
“In BWB’s latest book of essays, edited by Morgan Godfery, ten of New Zealand’s sharpest emerging thinkers gather to debate the ‘morbid symptoms’ of the current moment, from precarious work to climate change, and to discuss what shape change might take, from ‘the politics of love’ to postcapitalism”. The Interregnum interrogates the future from the perspective of the generation who will shape it.” (Bridget Williams Books)

Enquiries to enquiries@wcl.govt.nz

Our Te Tiriti talks series are a collaboration between Wellington City Libraries and Groundwork:  Facilitating Change.

Tiriti Talks: Jen Margaret – The State of the Pākehā Nation

Nau mai, haere mai!  Wellington City Libraries are pleased to present the second of our free events to mark the signing of Te Tiriti o Waitangi in Te Whanganui-a-Tara that happened on the 29 April 1840

Where

The Hall, St John’s In The City
Cnr Willis & Dixon Streets (entrance on Dixon St)

When

Rātū / Tuesday  7 May  @  5.30-6.30 pm

About Jen Margaret

Jen Margaret is a Te Tiriti educator who devotes her time to working with individuals and organisations to deepen our understanding and application of Te Tiriti o Waitangi.

Her kōrero in this Te Tiriti talk series is based on the State of the Pākehā Nation essay commissioned for Waitangi Day 2018, entitled Ka pū te ruha, ka hao te rangatahi: change in the Pākehā nation. It explores the necessity to unravel privilege, racism and colonisation, and suggests ways in which Pākehā might work to do so.

Jen’s work is guided by the whakataukī : “Ko koe ki tēnā, ko ahau ki tēnēi I kīiwai o te kete”

This whakataukī has been adopted to convey the differing roles and responsibilities for Tangata Tiriti and Tangata Whenua within the Treaty relationship.

Jen has published the following resources which are listed on her website:

Working as allies, non-indigenous supporters of indigenous justice in Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand

Ngā Rerenga o Te Tiriti provides guidance to groups and organisations within the community sector regarding engaging with the Treaty of Waitangi.

Our Te Tiriti talks series are a collaboration between Wellington City Libraries and Groundwork:  Facilitating Change.

Enquiries to enquiries@wcl.govt.nz

Motu Kairangi – A free lunchtime kōrero

Nau mai, haere mai

Wellington City Libraries presents a free lunchtime kōrero about the history of Te Motu Kairangi (The Miramar peninsula).

WATTS PENINSULA: Public walking trails will be established and Fort Ballance will be restored.

The Speaker Morrie Love will mark the signing of Te Tiriti o Waitangi at Te Whanganui-a-Tara, on the 29th April 1840 in his kōrero of Te Motu Kairangi.

Date: Monday 29th April

Place: St Andrew’s Conference Centre, Hall (access to the right of the St Andrew’s on the Terrace building)

Time:  12:30 – 1:15pm

Enquiries to ann.reweti@wcc.govt.nz

One version of the story of the settlement of the eastern shores of Te Whanaganui-a-Tara by Ngāi Tara, Ngāti Itra is told by Elsdon Best in The land of Tara – we have this digitised version  on our Māori Resource page.

The migrations of iwi and hapū from the East Coast – the stories of Ngāti Porou / Ngāti Kahungunu are a complex acount of journeys, fighting and intermarriage.  “Ngāti Kahungunu” was the blanket label given to the eastern tribes by Te Atiawa as the Taranaki iwi sought to plant their foothold on the western shores and the inner harbour between 1820s and 1840s – up to the arrival of the New Zealand Company and its first six ships of immigrants in 1839-1840.

You can also check out our Te Whanganui-a-Tara index of Māori history and here are some eBooks from our catalogue on ‘Te Tirit o Waitangi’.

The Treaty of Waitangi / Orange, Claudia
“Since its publication in 1987, Claudia Orange’s book has become the standard guide to one of the key documents in New Zealand history, selling over 40,000 copies. The complexities of the Treaty, which have done so much to shape New Zealand history for nearly 200 years, are thoughtfully explored as Orange examines the meanings the document has held for Māori and Pākehā. A new introduction brings it up to date with all that has happened since, complementing the book’s lucid and well-researched exploration of how and why the Treaty was signed.” (Catalogue)

Treaty of Waitangi [electronic resource] / Calman, Ross
“The book’s first two parts consider how the Christian word was spread and how Maori responded, explaining the identification they felt with the Israelites of the Old Testament. The third part relates the rise of indigenous religious movements, from the early Papahurihia through Pai Marire, Ringatu and the Parihaka Movement, and the later incarnations of the Arowhenua Movement in the South Island and what remains today’s leading Maori church, Ratana.” (Catalogue)

Treaty of Waitangi settlements
“The settlement of iwi claims under the Treaty of Waitangi has drawn international attention, as other nations seek ways to build new relationships between indigenous peoples and the state. Here leading scholars consider the impact of Treaty settlements on the management and ownership of key resources (lands, forests and fisheries); they look at the economic and social consequences for Māori, and the impact of the settlement process on Crown–Māori relationships. And they ask ‘how successful has the settlement process been?'” (Catalogue)

The story of a treaty / Orange, Claudia
“The Treaty of Waitangi is a central document in New Zealand history. This lively account tells the story of the Treaty from its signing in 1840 through the debates and struggles of the nineteenth century to the gathering political momentum of recent decades. The second edition of this popular book brings the story up to the present”–Back cover.” (Catalogue)

Te tiriti, te pakanga, ngā kōrero nehe

This month the story of Bunty Preece gives us insight into the war efforts of D Company, 28 Māori Battalion, and there is a revised edition of Claudia Orange’s excellent introduction to the Treaty of Waitangi.

Syndetics book coverTurning points : events that changed the course of New Zealand history / Paul Moon.
“Historian Paul Moon has chosen 20 events that have shaped the course of New Zealand history over the years. The events are described and illustrated with photographs drawn from the archives, and Moon outlines how New Zealand history has changed as a result”–Publisher’s information.

Syndetics book coverGreater Māori Auckland / David Simmons ; including the Māori place names of Auckland, collected by George Graham.
Here, David Simmons extends his earlier account of the many traditions and legends of the Auckland isthmus to its wider context, the countryside beyond.”–back cover.

Syndetics book coverKawea te wairua o te kupu / Agnes McFarland (ētita).
“Ko te tuhituhi o te whakaritenga o te whakaaro o tēnei pukapuka he whakatakoto huarahi ki ngā kāinga kōrero i tipu i roto i ngā tau kia kaua e wareware kia kitea ō mātau, ō tātau kanohi ngā kaituhi, ēnei kaituhi ki ngā hapori reo o tōu whānau, hapū, iwi. Kai kona te tika, kai kona te ora, kai kona e hora ai te kupu kia kaua e noho noa ki runga i te whārangi kohokoho, maremare ai. Koia te kaupapa o tēnei tuhituhi kia tipu ngā momo whakataurite, te anga whakaputanga o ngā whakahoutanga o te whakaaro mā tātau katoa ngā kaituhi me te hunga kai te piki ake”–Publisher’s website.

Syndetics book coverKia puāwaitia ngā tumanako : critical issues for whānau in Māori education / Jessica Hutchings … [et al.].
“The kaupapa Māori-driven methodology of whanaungatanga, the process of wānanga, and methods of gathering kōrero ā-whānau have enabled us to identify critical issues for whānau in te kōhanga reo, wharekura, early childhood educaton and Pākehā schools”–p. vi-vii.

Syndetics book coverBunty Preece : soldier of the 28 (Māori) Battalion / Tom O’Connor.
The story of Alfred (Bunty) Preece of the Chatham Islands (Moriori, Kāi Tahu), soldier, farmer, local body politician, kaumatua and advocate for his people. Includes his recollections of the Italian Campaign of World War Two while serving with the D Company 28 (Māori) Battalion. Includes a full nominal roll of members of D Company.

Syndetics book coverThe story of a treaty / Claudia Orange.
“The Treaty of Waitangi is a central document in New Zealand history. This lively account tells the story of the Treaty from its signing in 1840 through the debates and struggles of the nineteenth century to the gathering political momentum of recent decades. The second edition of this popular book brings the story up to the present”–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverMaori designs / Penny Brown.This book is published by Search Press, UK and is no. 7 in a series titled “The design library” – Penny Brown has contributed two other books in the series – Art nouveau designs, and Celtic designs. There is no explanation as to what the designs represent, or whence they were derived.

AlterNative : an international journal of indigenous peoples ; vol. 9, issue 1 (2013)
p. 3. Mana whenua and the settlement of Treaty of Waitangi claims in the Central North Island of New Zealand by Rāpata Wiri.
“This paper discusses the application of mana whenua or Māori custom law in a controversial Treaty of Waitangi settlement known as the “Treelords Deal”. “–Abstract.

MAI Journal: A New Zealand journal of indigenous scholarship ;volume 2, no. 1
The newest issue of MAI Journal is now available (online).
http://www.journal.mai.ac.nz/
Anne-Marie Jackson provides a discursive analysis of rangatiratanga in the context of Māori fisheries. Jackson explores the restrictions that the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi give to the term rangatiratanga and its authority.
The article entitled “Whānau-centred health and social service delivery in New Zealand” by Amohia Boulton, Jennifer Tamehana and Tula Brannelly explores the “whānau ora philosophy that became the cornerstone of Māori health policy” and offer their observations on how important this new policy approach has been, and will be in the coming years.
Spencer Lilley proposes to fill the gap in literature in her paper “Māori Career Information Seeking.” She finds that it is the interpersonal relationships of the individuals to be the main informer for rangatahi.
A descriptive study in maintaining relationships and accessing information is presented by Acushla O’Carroll in the article entitled “An Analysis of How Rangatahi Māori Use Social Networking Sites”