Te Tiriti talks at Central Library

On Friday 29 April Wellington City Libraries, in collaboration with Wellington Treaty Network, begins a series of three “Tiriti” talks at Central Library covering themes of past, present and future.

1
Hineteiwaiwa. Haeata Collective, 1990, Robyn Kahukiwa, artist : Mana Tiriti
Friday 29 April 12.30pm:
The series begins with stories of the local signatories to Te Tiriti within the rohe of Te Whanganui-a-Tara, April and May, 1840.
Mana Whenua – Honiana Love, Mark Teone, Kura Moeahu — describe whānau who put their marks to Henry Williams’ “treaty” sheet no. 8, April, 1840.

There will be stories of Kumutoto, Pipitea/Waiwhetu, and Piti-one – describing well-known identities, such as Te Puni, Wi Tako, and others less well-known, but whose life histories are important to us, ngā uri of those who made their hikoi to this rohe in 1820s-1840s.

2
Claudia Orange. ‘Treaty of Waitangi – Creating the Treaty of Waitangi’, Te Ara – the Encyclopedia of New Zealand, updated 16-Nov-12
Licensed by Manatū Taonga Ministry for Culture and Heritage for re-use under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 New Zealand Licence.

Friday 6 May 12.30pm:
The theme of the second week is a contemporary issue: Clean Water — and illustrates local solutions for a global problem.
Ray Ahipene-Mercer was at the forefront of the drive for clean water, joining the Wellington Clean Water Campaign, 1984, and taking a claim to the Waitangi Tribunal in 1986. This claim was put on hold when Wellington citizens began to see the need for changes to the local sewage treatment. Concern for the water issues led to collaboration with Aila Taylor, (Motunui Claim) and other iwi, in raising awareness of nationwide issues of pollution.

3Image courtesy of wellington.govt.nz
Morrie Love will speak also – his theme: his experiences with indigenous freshwater fish – important tales so little known to many people of this rohe.

Friday 13/5 12.30pm:
The third week centres on the Pākehā engagement with the Treaty – describing a thirty year collective action by Project Waitangi/Wellington Treaty Network whose members were challenged by questions along the lines of: – “so what are you doing about the treaty”?
Speakers include Mary Haggie, Jeff Drane and Jen Margaret.

4
Nau mai, haere mai ki to tātou whare pukapuka : Te Matapihi ki te Ao Nui

In conclusion:
Would you have voted for a flag like this? Kiwi iwi flag by Mere Drake (nee Wehipeihana)
5
This design acknowledges the unique place of Tangata Whenua and their partnership with Tangata Tiriti in the signing of Te Tiriti o Waitangi and illustrates the following themes:
• A marriage contract of aroha, Tangata Tiriti signed on behalf of the Crown which enabled may peoples to come to New Zealand
• The beautiful colours of the rainbow represent the many cultures of New Zealand
• The weave represents integration of cultures
• Our links to the islands are also acknowledged and form a cross an important part of our heritage

Beautiful books

The illustrated history, Tangata Whenua stands as a colossus amongst this month’s selection of books, but there are other remarkable books such as the story of Richard Nunns and Māori music, and the very readable snippets of life from Witi Ihimaera. Local poet, Apirana Taylor publishes his latest collection of poetry and Hōne Sadler’s Ngāpuhi narrative (in te reo Māori) will be treasured by his people and all speakers of te reo. The Walters whānau have recorded the stories of wharenui of the motu in another beautifully illustrated book.

Syndetics book coverThe Healthy Country? : A History of Life & Death in New Zealand
“In this book, Alistair Woodward and Tony Blakely tell the extraordinary story of life and death in Aotearoa New Zealand from first Maori settlement to the 21st century. Did Maori or Europeans live longer in 1769? How did Pakeha New Zealanders become the healthiest, most long lived people on the face of the globe (and why did Maori not enjoy the same life expectancy)? What caused New Zealanders’ health and longevity to be surpassed by other nations in the late twentieth century?… ‘The Healthy Country?’ is important reading for anyone interested in the story of New Zealanders and a decisive intervention in debates about health, disease and medicine.” (Syndetics summary)
Chap. 1. Before Cook : the long history of human longevity
Chap. 2. Māori majority : the first hundred years after Cook
Chap. 4. Decline and recovery ; Māori from 1860-1940

Polynesian legends and other poems / by A. Stanley Sherratt ; edited by Mark Pirie ; introduction by Dr Michael O’Leary.

Syndetics book coverTe ara puoro : a journey into the world of Māori music / Richard Nunns with Allan Thomas.
“Te Ara Puoro tells the story of Richard Nunn’s remarkable journey; of how fragments of knowledge given by elders were pieced together through countless presentations and performances on marae the length and breadth of the country; of how the instruments were re-created and developed; and of how he subsequently mastered their playing. The book gathers together an enormous amount of the current knowledge about taonga puoro, and will undoubtedly be the most important written resource in existence on the subject. It also charts the many other paths that Richard has taken with the music, including the huge variety of recordings he has done, his sound-track work, and his playing in other genres, such as free jazz and classical”–Publisher website.

The Mangatū remedies report / Waitangi Tribunal.
“This publication is the outcome of a Supreme Court directed Waitangi Tribunal hearing. In 1961, the Crown had purchased 8,522 acres of land in the Mangatū 1 block north of Gisborne for the establishment of a forest to prevent hill country erosion and downstream flooding. The Tribunal had earlier found that the Crown had breached the Treaty of Waitangi when it acquired this land, and in the current inquiry, four claimant groups – the Mangatū Incorporation, Te Aitanga a Māhaki and Affiliates, Ngā Ariki Kaipūtahi, and Te Whānau a Kai – sought binding recommendations relating to the Mangatū Crown forest licensed lands. The Tribunal strongly urged the applicants to reunite and return to negotiations with the Crown.”–Publisher information.

Koowhiti / editorial panel: Tanemahuta Gray, Merenia Gray, Jennifer Stevenson, Peter Cleave, Paul Moon and Linda Ashley.

Syndetics book coverMāori boy : a memoir of childhood / Witi Ihimaera.“This honest, stirring work tells of the family and community into which Ihimaera was born, of his early life in rural New Zealand, of family secrets, of facing anguish and challenges, and of laughter and love. As Ihimaera recounts the myths that formed his early imagination, he also reveals the experiences from real life that wriggle into his fiction. Alive with an inventive, stimulating narrative and vividly portrayed relatives, this memoir is engrossing, entertaining and moving, but, more than this, it is also a vital record of what it means to grow up Māori”–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverMarae : te tatau pounamu : a journey around New Zealand’s meeting houses / Muru, Robin & Sam Walters. “A documentation of and tribute to New Zealand’s wharenui, big and small … Includes detailed shots of their carvings, kōwhaiwhai panels, tukutuku panels and much more. Many are photographed during an event”–Publisher information.
“For three years Muru, Robin and Sam Walters visited this country’s marae to bring together a beautiful photographic book on the meeting house… this handsome book captures the huge variety of New Zealand’s original architecture”–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverPuna wai kōrero : an anthology of Māori poetry in English / edited by Reina Whaitiri and Robert Sullivan.
“Two leading Māori scholars collect Māori poetic voices in English and let flow a wellspring of poetry. From both revered established writers as well as exciting new voices, the poems in Puna Wai Korero offer a broad picture of Maori poetry in English. The voices are many and diverse: confident, angry, traditional, respectful, experimental, despairing and full of hope, expressing a range of poetic techniques and the full scope of what it is to be Māori”–Publisher’s website.

Syndetics book coverTangata whenua : an illustrated history / Atholl Anderson, Judith Binney, Aroha Harris.
“Tangata Whenua portrays the sweep of Māori history from Pacific origins to the twenty-first century. Through narrative and images, it offers an overview of the past, grounded in specific localities and histories”–Publisher information.

Syndetics book coverThe breathing tree : new poems / Apirana Taylor.
“This collection offers forty new poems from popular poet Apirana Taylor. Inspired by nature and mythology, he shifts his focus from the mundane to the mysterious”–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverPrendergast : legal villain? / Grant Morris.
“James Prendergast is the most infamous figure in New Zealand’s legal history, known mainly for his condemnation of the Treaty of Waitangi as “a simple nullity” in 1877. But during his lifetime Prendergast was a highly respected lawyer and judge. He was arguably New Zealand’s dominant legal professional from 1865 to 1899, and his good reputation remained intact until the 1980s, when the Treaty of Waitangi finally returned to the centre of New Zealand political life. The more the Treaty has been celebrated, the more Prendergast has been condemned. “–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverPēwhairangi : Bay of Islands missions and Māori 1814 to 1845 / Angela Middleton.
“… It is the story of New Zealand’s first permanaent European settlement at Hoki and the church mission that it represented, and of the other mission communities subsequently established in the Bay of Islands, at Kerikeri, Paihia, Waimate and Te Puna. It is a story of Ngāpuhi and Pākehā engagement, as neighbours, over four decades.”–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverKo tautoro, te pito o tōku ao : a Ngāpuhi narrative / Hōne Sadler.
“Sadler illustrates the unbroken chain of Ngāpuhi sovereignty by looking in-depth at his own hapū of Ngāti Moerewa, Ngāti Rangi and Ngāi Tawake ki te Waokū of Tautoro and Matarāua. The narrative is told through weaving together karakia and whakapapa, histories and kōrero that have been part of the oral traditions of Ngāpuhi’s whānau, hapū and iwi and handed down through the generations on marae and other gathering places”–Publisher information.

Syndetics book coverTurning the hearts of the children : early Māori leaders in the Mormon Church / edited by Selwyn Kātene.
“History of Church of Latter-day Saints involvement with Māori in NZ, with chapters based on 12 early prominent Māori figures”–Publisher information. “…Mormons did not reject traditional Māori socio-cultural mores. They shared reverence for family and genealogy and were guided by visions and dreams”–back cover. Profiled: Hirini Whaanga, Raihi Ngāwaka, Whatahoro Jury, Ngāhuia Chase, Percy Going, Hōhepa Heperi, Te Rāwhiti Paerata, Stuart Meha, Wetekia Elkington, Sidney Christy, Pare Takana (Duncan), Tūrake Manuirirangi.

Aotearoa New Zealand social work ; vol. 24, no. 4 (Review ed., 2014)
p. 65. Spirituality and social work : introducing a spiritual dimension into social work education and practice by Carol Phillips.

Archaeology in New Zealand ; vol. 57, no. 4 (December 2014)
P. 199. New Zealand’s settlement date : the last word? (or at least the latest) by Garry Law.
An instant vote taken without warning, at the 2014 NZAA Conference requesting participants to nominate a single AD date “for the earliest settlement of New Zealand by ancestors of the Maori.” 51 votes were accepted.

New Zealand journal of educational studies ; vol. 49, no. 2 (2014)
p. 176. Researching identity with indigenous D/deaf youth by Anne Hynds, Susan Faircloth, Clint Green and Helen Jacob.
p. 205. Representing Māori youth voices in community education research by Joanna Kidman.

New Zealand journal of history ; vol. 48, no. 2 (October 2014)
p. 50. Solidarity across the ‘colour line’ : Māori representation in the Maoriland worker, 1910-1914 by Cybele Locke.
p. 119. A window for revisionism : presenting te Tiriti in the Primary school bulletins, 1957 by Rachael Bell.

New Zealand legacy ; vol. 26, no. 1 (2014)
p. 20. The problematic portraits of Pomare II by Keith Giles.

New Zealand legacy ; vol. 26, no. 3 (2014)
p. 5. William Swanson Read Bloomfield (1885-1968) ; was he the first architect with Māori ancestry? by Denys Oldham.
p. 17. Well off the beaten track ; the site of New Zealand’s first Roman Catholic mass by Robin Astridge.

Oral history in New Zealand ; vol. 26 (2014)
p. 31. Tuia te ao marama : oral histories with Māori mental health nurses by Maria baker, Tio Sewell & Hineroa Hakiaha.

Mihinare, Hāhi Karaitiana, Whakapono

Two books recount the influence of the Missionaries and the beginnings of the conversion of Māori to a Christian faith; there’s an overview of performing arts, and an account of interracial marriages.

Syndetics book coverThe conversion of the Maori : years of religious and social change, 1814-1842 / Timothy Yates.“Timothy Yates recounts the history of missions among the Māori people of New Zealand in the mid-1800s. After describing the anthropological background of early Māori society, the book examines the first introduction of Christian mission by Samuel Marsden and the establishment of a Church Missionary Society base in 1814….Yates charts the significant changes in Māori society and religion over the course of nearly thirty years. After detailing the whole Māori conversion process, Yates ends the book with an extended treatment of conversion, both as a general phenomenon and in relation to the Māori.” (Back cover)

Syndetics book coverBible & Treaty : missionaries among the Māori : a new perspective / Keith Newman.
“[The book] brings a fresh perspective to the missionary story, from the lead-up to Samuel Marsden’s first sermon on New Zealand soil, and the intervening struggle for survival and understanding, to the dramatic events that unfolded around the Treaty of Waitangi and the disillusionment that led to the Land Wars in the 1860s. While some missionaries clearly failed to live up to their high calling, the majority committed their lives to Maori and were instrumental in spreading Christianity, brokering peace between warring tribes, and promoting literacy – publishing, for instance, the first indigenous-language Bible in the Southern Hemisphere”. (Back cover)

Syndetics book coverKia Rōnaki = The Māori performing arts / edited by Rachael Ka’ai-Mahuta, Tania Ka’ai & John Moorfield.
“In the last thirty years there has been an explosion of interest in the Maori performing arts but until now there has been no general book written in English or Maori about the Maori performing arts by Maori authors and exponents of the various genres. This new work, brings together the expertise of a range of performance artists and academics, consolidating their knowledge into a comprehensive single volume that will be of relevance to all those interested in the Maori performing arts.” (Back cover)

Syndetics book coverFavourite Māori legends / A.W. Reed ; revised by Ross Calman ; illustrated by Roger Hart.“Favourite Māori Legends is a classic collection of more than 30 Māori myths and legends handed down orally over many generations. They were retold by the great A. W. Reed when this book first appeared in 1965, and are here revised for a modern readership by editor and author Ross Calman.” (Back cover)

Syndetics book coverMatters of the heart : a history of interracial marriage in New Zealand / Angela Wanhalla.“In Matters of the heart, Angela Wanhalla introduces us to couples like [Kathleen Pine] and [Philip Soutar] to unravel the long history of interracial relationships in New Zealand. That history extends from whalers and traders marrying into Māori families in the early nineteenth century to the growth of interracial relationships in the later twentieth.” (Back cover)

Syndetics book coverWaka taua : the Maori war canoe / Jeff Evans.This is a new edition of an introduction to the waka taua – where “Jeff Evans recounts the ancient history and modern renaissance of the war canoe, detailing techniques, captain and crew roles, paddling routines and instruction. Embellished with historical and contemporary photographs and drawings, Waka Taua is a valuable guide to this timeless expression of Māori identity and power” (Back cover)

The legal framework for burial and cremation in New Zealand : a first principles review.
“This issues paper undertakes a first-principles review of New Zealand’s Burial and Cremation Act 1964 and its interaction with related legislation, including the Health Act 1956, the Resource Management Act 1991, the Health (Burial) Regulations 1946 and the Cremation Regulations 1973. It discusses the diverse social and cultural responses to death in contemporary New Zealand society” (Publisher description)
p. 183. Tikanga Māori concerning care and custody of the body.
p. 184. Takamore v. Clarke

Syndetics book coverGrumpy old men : 47 Kiwi blokes, who’ve been around long enough to know, tell you what’s wrong with the world / compiled by Paul Little & Dorothy Dudek Vinicombe.
“Grumpiness is the older person’s natural state, motivated by alarm–albeit often bemused or amused alarm–at everything that is wrong with the world… We live in a country that discourages grumpiness. We prefer people not to complain or make waves or express ideas that may make things difficult for us.” (Introduction) Men involved include: Gavin Bishop, Dick Frizzell, Tau Henare, Pare Keiha and Buddy Mikaere.

AlterNative ; vol. 9, issue 3 (2013)
p. 230. Virtual whanaungatanga : Māori utilizing social networking sites to attain and maintain relationships / Acushla Deanne O’Carroll.