#MatarikiMash # 6!

It’s time for another #MatarikiMash challenge! Your words for today are:

  • noho (sit/stay)
  • whānau (family)
  • watch
  • stand

Head over to Twitter to join in!

Wondering what’s going on? On Mondays and Wednesdays for four weeks, test your imagination and your skill with language, and help us celebrate Matariki! Inspired by the New Zealand Book Council’s #ramereshorts weekly Twitter competitions, we’ll be running a special word challenge for the 4 weeks of Matariki, every Monday and Wednesday.

We’ll post up two te reo Māori kupu those mornings, as well as two English words, and all you need to do, is bring your word play skills and include them in a tweet short story, together with the #MatarikiMash hashtag.

We’ll be retweeting entries through the day as they come in.

Matariki Mash

Many thanks go to the New Zealand Book Council, for letting us borrow their idea:

New Zealand Book Council

#MatarikiMash challenge #4

Welcome to another #MatarikiMash challenge! Your words for today are:

  • kura (school, red)
  • whai (follow, string game)
  • practice
  • season

Head over to Twitter to join in!

Wondering what’s going on? On Mondays and Wednesdays for four weeks, test your imagination and your skill with language, and help us celebrate Matariki! Inspired by the New Zealand Book Council’s #ramereshorts weekly Twitter competitions, we’ll be running a special word challenge for the 4 weeks of Matariki, every Monday and Wednesday.

We’ll post up two te reo Māori kupu those mornings, as well as two English words, and all you need to do, is bring your word play skills and include them in a tweet short story, together with the #MatarikiMash hashtag.

We’ll be retweeting entries through the day as they come in.

Matariki Mash

Many thanks go to the New Zealand Book Council, for letting us borrow their idea:

New Zealand Book Council

Postcards, urupa, travelling taonga

Two interesting books on the history of the New Zealand postcard have interesting examples of early Māori themed portraits and scenes. Then there is the inside story on Tariana Turia, and a biased spin on the activities of Tamati Waka Nene and Apirana Ngata

Syndetics book coverCrossing the floor : the story of Tariana Turia / Helen Leahy.
“This biography of Tariana Turia sees family members, iwi leaders, social justice advocates and politicians share their experiences of this remarkable woman. While parliament was not originally part of her life plan, Tariana Turia was involved in many community initiatives. A turning point came in 1995, when Tariana’s leadership was evident in the reoccupation of Pakaitore. Here was a woman with the courage to care, the determination to speak up and a deep commitment to whānau. Inevitably, she was invited to stand in the 1996 general election. In her eighteen years as an MP, she advanced thinking in the disability area, advocated for tobacco reform and spoke out about sexual abuse, violence and racism. She also led the Whānau Ora initiative. In 2004, she crossed the floor, leading to the birth of the Māori Party”–Publisher information.

Syndetics book coverKo Ngā Takahanga i a Ārihi i Te Ao Mīharo / Lewis Carroll ; nā John Tenniel i whakaahua; nā Tom Roa i whakamāori.He ingoa karangaranga a Lewis Carroll: Ko Charles Lutwidge Dodgson te ingoa tuturu. He kaikauwhau i te Pangarau i Christ Church, Oxford. — Lewis Carroll is a pen-name: Charles Lutwidge Dodgson was the author’s real name and he was lecturer in Mathematics in Christ Church, Oxford.

Syndetics book coverUnearthly landscapes : New Zealand’s early cemeteries, churchyards and urupā / Stephen Deed.
“… Immigrants brought with them a range of burial traditions, and of course Maori, already long established, had their own rituals. Over time, the various customs borrowed from one another to form a uniquely New Zealand way. In this beautifully written and illustrated book, Stephen Deed sets out to reconnect the historic cemeteries we see today with the history of this country and its people.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTell you what : great New Zealand nonfiction 2015 / edited by Jolisa Gracewood & Susanna Andrew.
“A fantastic collection of recent nonfiction essays, Tell You What contains live, wild, true stories from contemporary New Zealand. On the web and the wireless, in magazines and journals, at prizegivings and powhiri, New Zealanders are writing about the world. Essays and articles, speeches and submissions, tweets and travelogues–this book collects some of New Zealand’s best nonfiction from the past year into one anthology. Featuring New Zealand writers such as Steve Braunias, Lara Strongman, Eleanor Catton, and Tina Makereti, it explores a range of subjects, from mountain climbing and family secrets to cannibal snails and dangerous swims.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverSend me a postcard : New Zealand postcards and the story they tell / William Main.
“The first New Zealand picture postcards were published in 1897, and quickly established themselves as an enduring and popular part of our visual culture. In the early part of the 20th century sending postcards snowballed into a craze which had few precedents (it is estimated that 7.5 million postcards were sent through the mail in 1909) … This charming and nostalgic collection of postcards is popular history at its best, and will have wide appeal. The cards are graphically fascinating, while the story they tell provides an intriguing view of life in New Zealand in the last century.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverPost marks : the way we were : early New Zealand postcards, 1897-1922 / Leo Haks, Colleen Dallimore & Alan Jackson.
The way we were between 1897-1922 is revealed in more than 500 postcards that highlight New Zealand’s pioneer beginnings and the development of a unique cultural identity.

Tracking travelling taonga : a narrative review of how Māori items got to London from 1798, to Salem in 1802, 1807 and 1812, and elsewhere up to 1840 / by Rhys Richards. Machine-generated contents note: A French Visit to North Cape on 11 March 1793 — Lieutenant-Governor King from Norfolk Island to Muriwhenua in 1793 — The Fancy Trading for spars at Waihou (Thames) in 1795 — Mathew Flinders’ Tiki in 1795 — Sealers, Early Whalers and Spar Traders — American Traders to China — How Daniel Ward’s Donations Reached Salem in 1802 — The Donations of John Fitzpatrick Jeffrie in 1803 — The Donations of Captain William Richardson in 1807 — The Donations of Captain William Putnam Richardson in 1812 — Pacific Sealskins, Sandalwood and Beche de Mer — Other Early Taonga in American Collections — The Russians at Queen Charlotte Sound in 1820 — The Early Missionaries: Kendall and Marsden — The British Navy’s Search for Spars 1820-21 — Muskets for Preserved Heads from 1810 to 1840 — The French Collectors from 1824 to 1840 — Taonga in Other European Museums — Sperm Whalers from 1820 to 1840 — Six British Collectors of Taonga, 1820 to 1840 — The Three Maori Cloaks Donated by Mr C. Pettet — The Flax Trade from 1828 to 1833 — The Global Travels of the Mokomokai Daniel Aborn donated in 1831 — Taonga from the South Island — Remaining British Collections 1820 to 1840 — The United States Exploring Expedition in 1840 — Lost Provenances — Retrospect: The Collecting of Taonga before 1840.

Of Paekakariki : poetry, prose, pictures / collected by Sylvia Bagnall ; foreword by Sir John Trimmer.
“”Poetry, stories and artwork by people with a connection to Paekakariki”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)

Two great New Zealanders : the wisdom of Tamati Waka Nene and Apirana Ngata / John Robinson.

Remembering Parihaka

To acknowledge the village and the people of Parihaka, and to mourn the anniversary of the events which occurred there on November 5 1881, we have compiled a booklist of excellent Parihaka resources, including fiction, non-fiction and children’s books:

Syndetics book coverThe Parihaka woman / Witi Ihimaera.
“There has never been a New Zealand novel quite like The Parihaka Woman. Richly imaginative and original, weaving together fact and fiction, it sets the remarkable story of Erenora against the historical background of the turbulent and compelling events that occurred in Parihaka during the 1870s and 1880s. Parihaka is the place Erenora calls home, a peaceful Taranaki settlement overcome by war and land confiscation. As her world is threatened, Erenora must find within herself the strength, courage and ingenuity to protect those whom she loves. And, like a Shakespearean heroine, she must change herself before she can take up her greatest challenge and save her exiled husband, Horitana. Surprising, inventive and deeply moving, The Parihaka Woman confirms Witi Ihimaera as one of New Zealand’s finest and most memorable storytellers.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverGhosts of Parihaka / David Hair.
“It hasn’t been an easy time for Matiu Douglas, magical adept. One of his friends is now a ghost, his enemies have stolen the Treaty of Waitangi, he can’t date the girl he really likes and he keeps getting unwanted marriage proposals from a dangerous, centuries-old tohunga’s daughter. But when his best friend, Riki, is snatched into the ghost-world of Aotearoa during a school trip, Mat has to put all his other worries aside and act fast. For Riki vanished at Parihaka, scene of one of the darkest acts from New Zealand’s colonial past, and in Aotearoa such places are deadly dangerous” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverAsk that mountain : the story of Parihaka / Dick Scott.
“Parihaka has become a byword for Maori refusal to yield land, culture and dignity to New Zealand’s colonial government. Well after the end of the New Zealand Wars, the people of this small settlement at the foot of Mt Taranaki held out against the encroachments of Pakeha settlers in a struggle that swapped the weapons of war for the weapons of peace.Taking as their symbol the white feather, the chiefs Te Whiti and Tohu led Parihaka in one of the world’s first-recorded campaigns of passive resistance. Maori ploughmen wrote its message across the settlers’ pastures, and Maori fencers underlined the point by throwing barriers across the queen’s highways. Withstanding repeated military action, the spirit of resistance born at Parihaka kept alive the flame of that supposedly ‘dying race’, the Maori.Ask That Mountain draws on official papers, settler manuscripts and oral history to give the first complete account of what took place at Parihaka. Now in its ninth edition, this seminal work was in 1995 named by the Sunday Star-Times as one of the ten most important books published in New Zealand.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe Parihaka album : lest we forget / Rachel Buchanan.
“A photo album doesn’t tell the whole story of a family and this book doesn’t tell the whole story of Parihaka. Rather, it is a collection of snapshots, a patchwork quilt, a scrapbook, a mongrel record my own efforts to understand one of the most important and disturbing events in New Zealand history – the 1881 invasion of Parihaka – and its powerful, complicated legacy. Rachel Buchanan The Parihaka Album: Lest We Forget blends the personal and the historical. It tracks the author Rachel Buchanan’s discovery of her family’s links with Parihaka and her Maori and Pakeha ancestor’s roles in the early days of the city that is now Wellington.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverWanderings with the Mãori prophets, Te Whiti & Tohu (with illustrations of each chief) : being reminiscences of a twelve months’ companionship with them, from their arrival in Christchurch in April 1882, until their return to Parihaka in March 1883 / by John P. Ward.
“Being Reminiscences Of A Twelve Months’ Companionship With Them, From Their Arrival In Christchurch In April 1882, Until Their Return To Parihaka In March, 1883.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverRemember that November / written by Jennifer Beck ; illustrated by Lindy Fisher.
“It’s almost Guy Fawkes Night, and at the school speech competition Andy talks about Guy Fawkes and the Gunpowder Plot. The children cheer excitedly, thinking Andy will win the contest. But then, Aroha gets up, wearing a white feather in her hair, and tells the story of another fifth of November u the invasion of Parihaka in 1881.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverMaumahara ki tērā Nōema / nā Jennifer Beck rāua ko Lindy Fisher ; nā Kawata Teepa i whakamāori.
“It’s almost Guy Fawkes Night, and at the school speech competition Andy talks about Guy Fawkes and the Gunpowder Plot. The children cheer excitedly, thinking Andy will win the contest. But then, Aroha gets up, wearing a white feather in her hair, and tells the story of another fifth of November u the invasion of Parihaka in 1881.” (Syndetics summary)

Tā moko

Tattooing seems to be a flavour of the month. There is a beautifully illustrated book of over 20 tattooists – including artists of tā moko, and tatau. As well, there are theses by Rawinia Higgins and Ridgely Dunn.

Syndetics book coverMai i te kākano / nā Hēni Jacob.
“Mai i te Kākano aims to help Māori language speakers and learners sustain more animated, in-depth conversations in Māori. It gives examples of alternative and fun ways to say things in everyday situations. Included are sections on Māori idiom and metaphor, common errors, useful phrases, and examples of language in use in a vaiety of settings, including in the home, at the supermarket, at the beach, and on the sports field”–back cover.

Syndetics book coverTū / nā Patricia Grace ; nā Wiremu rāua ko Te Ohorere Kaa i whakamāori.
“The only survivor of three young men who went to war from his family, Tū faces the past and tells his niece and nephew, through the pages of his war journal, what really happened to the brothers as the Māori Battalion fought the war in Italy”–Publisher information. This is the Te Reo version of Patricia Graces’ narrative of the story of Tu.

Syndetics book coverNew Zealand tattoo : in the home of the tattooist’s art / Chris Hoult ; text by Steve Forbes” [This book] presents the view from a cross-section of tattoo studios in 2012. Featuring photography of the tattooists and the tattooed, it profiles over 20 leading artists and gives insights into both the history and the renaissance of all three traditions: tā moko (Māori tattoo), tatau (Pacific Islands tattoo) and tattoo (European and Asian forms)”.–back cover.

Syndetics book coverIf I only had time / John Rowles with Angus Gillies.
“Here [John Rowles] speaks candidly with Angus Gillies, noting the tremendous achievements as well as the pressures and mishaps along the way. An irrepressible optimist, John tells a story that’s full of humour and is hard to put down.”–inside jacket. An easy read, but fascinating tale of the boy from Kawerau who made it to London, Las Vegas, Hawai’i and everywhere in between.

Syndetics book coverArt New Zealand ; no. 144 (Summer 2012-13)
p. 52. Waharua kopito : Māori cloaks at Te Papa by Peter Ireland.

(Kahu ora = living cloaks)-
“Fautlessly crafted by curator Awhina Tamarapa, Kahu ora manifests what was made plain by her scholarly accessible, beautifully designed and produced book, Whatu kakahu / Maori cloaks published last year – where eight specialist pooled their knowledge to give the most comprehensive account to date of this key strand of Maori culture”–p. 52-3.(Te Papa )

Historical review (Bay of Plenty journal of history) ; vol. 60, no. 2 ; (November 2012)
p. 49. Saving Te Urewera heritage by Dean Flavell
p. 52. Mataatua wharenui : the long journey home by Dr Ian Shearer
p. 55. Te Koputu a Te Whanga a Toi, Whakatane Library and Exhibition Centre

Five Theses:
Village of peace, village of war : Parihaka stories 1881-2004 / Rachel Anne Buchanan.

Conceptualising wairuatanga : rituals, relevance and realities for teachers : a dissertation in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Teaching and Learning in the University of Canterbury / by Gipsy Foster.

Poia mai taku poi : unearthing the knowledge of the past : a critical review of written literature on the poi in New Zealand and the Pacific : a thesis submitted for the degree of Master of Arts at the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand / Karyn Ailsa Paringatai.
The primary objective of this thesis is to review literature written about poi in order to construct an historical overview of poi from pre-contact Māori society until the 1920s. The mythological and Polynesian origins of poi, traditional and contemporary materials and methods used to make poi, early travellers, explorers, and settlers accounts of poi and two case studies on the use of poi in the Taranaki and Te Arawa areas will be included in this thesis. The information will be used to show the changes in poi that have occured since Māori and European arrival to New Zealand until the 1920s.

He tānga ngutu, he Tūhoetanga te Mana Motuhake o te tā moko wāhine: the identity politics of moko kauae : a thesis submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand / by Rawinia R. Higgins.
Tā moko (Māori tattooing), especially facial moko (tattoo), has become a popular mechanism for the expression of self determination. Many Māori people are adopting this art form as part of a renaissance of Māori culture in Aotearoa/New Zealand. This declaration of Māori self-determination is also an assertion of the pride felt by the tangata whenua (people of the land) for their culture, their language and more, importantly, their identity. This thesis will illustrate how moko kauae (female chin tattooing) is a means of expressing Māori identity with specific reference to Tūhoe identity. Using an Indigenous theoretical framework this Māori Studies thesis examines the historical and contemporary political dimensions of moko kauae, the interface with the Māori worldview (inclusive of its cultural concepts), and its relationship to identity politics. This will be complimented by the personal stories of Tūhoe women who have undertaken moko kauae as well as commentaries from other Tūhoe people who express what their Tūhoetanga means to them and their lives.

Challenging appropriation : modern moko and western subculture / by Ridgely Dunn.

Re-colonisation and indigenous resistance : neoliberalism in the Pacific / Ema Maria Bargh.

Arohatia te reo! We love te reo!

Amazon link.

 

 

 

Kei te whakanuia te Wiki o te Reo Māori e Te Matapihi ki te Ao Nui, mā te pakiwaitara reo-rua a te kaikōrero rongonui nei, kaituhi rongonui, kairotarota, kaiako hoki a Moira Wairama.

Ka hāngai tēnei kaupapa kore utu ki te wā pakiwaitara kōhungahunga o ia wiki, ā, he paku waiata hoki.

11.45am-12.15pm
Rāhoroi, 1 o Akuhata
Whare Pukapuka, 65 Tiriti o Wikitōria
Nau mai haere mai.

Wellington City Libraries is celebrating te Wiki o te Reo Māori with a special bi-lingual story time by Moira Wairama a well known storyteller, award winning writer, poet and teacher.

This free session follows the regular pre-school story time and includes some simple waiata.