He waka eke noa

I te marama nei : he whakamātau hinengaro, he mana whakairo hinengaro, he mana motuhake, he wai māori, i te ao hurihuri : indigenous issues of psychology, intellectual property rights, water rights, in the evolving world.

Syndetics book coverThe Māori meeting house : introducing the whare whakairo / Damian Skinner.
“This all-new guide to the whare whakairo, or decorated Maori meeting house, covers every aspect of these treasures–their history and evolution, structure and art forms, and symbolism and cultural significance. With more than a hundred intriguing historical and contemporary photographs, and containing dozens of diagrams and a helpful glossary, the book clearly illustrates the parts, and the arts, of the whare whakairo with reference to numerous meeting houses from all over Aotearoa New Zealand and the world… The Maori Meeting House makes an important contribution to contemporary discussions about indigenous art history and taonga Maori.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverArtefacts of encounter : Cook’s voyages, colonial collecting and museum histories / edited by Nicholas Thomas, Julie Adams, Billie Lythberg, Maia Nuku & Amiria Salmond ; photography by Gwil Owen.
“The Pacific artefacts and works of art collected during the three voyages of Captain James Cook and the navigators, traders and missionaries who followed him are of foundational importance for the study of art and culture in Oceania… The Cook voyage collection at the MAA is among the four or five most important in the world, containing over 200 of the 2000-odd objects with Cook voyage provenance that are dispersed throughout the world. This stunning book catalogues this collection, and its cutting-edge scholarship sheds new light on the significance of many artefacts of encounter.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverIndigenous notions of ownership and libraries, archives and museums / edited by Camille Callison, Loriene Roy and Gretchen Alice LeCheminant.
“Forms of indigenous knowledges and cultural expressions are found in libraries, archives or museums. Often the “legal” copyright is not held by the indigenous people’s groups, who believe that the true expression of their culture can only be sustained and remain dynamic in its proper cultural context. The aim is to respect these ways of knowing while appreciating the cultural memory institutions’ attempts to transmit them to the next generation.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTupuna awa : people and politics of the Waikato River / Marama Muru-Lanning.
“‘We have always owned the water . . . we have never ceded our mana over the river to anyone’, King Tuheitia Paki asserted in 2012. Prime Minister John Key disagreed: ‘King Tuheitia’s claim that Maori have always owned New Zealand’s water is just plain wrong’. So who does own the water in New Zealand – if anyone – and why does it matter? By examining the debates over water in one New Zealand river, over a single recent period, Muru-Lanning provides a powerful lens through which to view modern iwi politics, debates over water ownership, and contests for power between Maori and the state.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Te manu kai i te mātauranga : indigenous psychology in Aotearoa/New Zealand / Waikaremoana Waitoki & Michelle Levy, editors.
Contents: Foreword: Ka awatea / Michelle Levy & Waikaremoana Waitoki — Introduction: My name is Ripeka / Waikaremoana Waitoki — Chapter 1: Kaupapa Māori psychologies / Michelle Levy — Chapter 2: A ripple of intimacy with creation : the stone bird of sorrow / Virginia Tamanui — Chapter 3: Whanaungatanga : asking who you are; not, what you are / Maynard Gilgen and Māmari Stephens — Chapter 4: Te toka tū moana : resilience, love and hope / Ainsleigh Cribb-Su’a & Hilda Te Pania-Hemopo — Chapter 5: Healing whānau violence : a love story / Erana Cooper & Sharon Rickard — Chapter 6: Re : “I just want to heal my family” / Lisa Cherrington — Chapter 7: Ngā rākau a te pākehā : Matiu’s story / Simon Bennett — Chapter 8: A new moon : talking story with Ripeka to support the healing of soul wounds / Melissa Taitimu — Chapter 9: Wairuatanga / Hukarere Valentine — Chapter 10: ‘Haerenga ki waiora’ : my experience of inpatient mental health services / Julie Wharewera-Mika — Chapter 11: Māori and neuropsychological assessment / Margaret Dudley — Chapter 12: He wāhine āwhina : a healing narrative of end of life care / Tess Moeke-Maxwell — Chapter 13: A partnered approach to psychological assessment : he ritenga whaimōhio / Sonja Macfarlane — Chapter 14: Kaihau waiū : attributes gained through mother’s milk : the importance of our very first relationship / Tania Cargo — Chapter 15: He kākano mai I rangiātea / Bridgette Masters-Awatere — Chapter 16: Ngā kete mātauranga : a curriculum for an indigenous psychology / Waikaremoana Waitoki.

Syndetics book coverThe Great War for New Zealand : Waikato 1800-2000 / Vincent O’Malley.
“A monumental new account of the defining conflict in New Zealand history. It was war in the Waikato in 1863-64 that shaped the nation in all kinds of ways: setting back Māori and Pākehā relations by several generations and allowing the government to begin to assert the kind of real control over the country that had eluded it since 1840. Spanning nearly two centuries from first contact through to settlement and apology, Vincent O’Malley focuses on the human impact of the war, its origins and aftermath. Based on many years of research and illustrated throughout, The Great War for New Zealand is a groundbreaking book written in the conviction that a nation needs to own its history.” (Publisher information)

E ngā uri whakatupu : weaving legacies : Dame Rangimarie Hetet and Diggeress Te Kanawa / authors, Ngahuia Te Awekotuku, Kahutoi Mere Te Kanawa, Rangituatahi Te Kanawa, Barbara Pareatai Moke.
“Describes the Waikato Museum Te Whare Taonga o Waikato exhibition, ‘E nga uri whakatupu, Weaving legacies : Dame Rangimarie Hetet and Diggeress Rangituatahi Te Kanawa’, which ran from 29th June 2014 to 28th July 2015 and was the most significant collection of Maori korowai and weaving ever shown in Aotearoa New Zealand. Includes a waiata composed by Dame Rangimarie Hetet.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverJourney to a hanging / Peter Wells.
“Part history, part biography, part social commentary, this fascinating book is about infamous events that shook New Zealand to its core. In 1865, Rev Carl Sylvius Volkner was hanged, his head cut off, his eyes eaten and his blood drunk from his church chalice. One name – Kereopa Te Rau (Kaiwhatu: The Eye-eater) – became synonymous with the murder. In 1871 he was captured, tried and sentenced to death. But then something remarkable happened. Sister Aubert and William Colenso – two of the greatest minds in colonial New Zealand – came to his defence. Regardless, Kereopa Te Rau was hanged in Napier Prison. But even a century and a half later, the events have not been laid to rest. Peter Wells travels back into an antipodean heart of darkness and illuminates how we try to make sense of the past, how we heal, remember – and forget.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe land is our history : indigeneity, law, and the settler state / Miranda Johnson.
The Land Is Our History tells the story of indigenous legal activism at a critical political and cultural juncture in Australia, Canada, and New Zealand. In the late 1960s, indigenous activists protested assimilation policies and the usurpation of their lands as a new mining boom took off, radically threatening their collective identities. Often excluded from legal recourse in the past, indigenous leaders took their claims to court with remarkable results… Miranda Johnson examines how indigenous peoples advocated for themselves in courts and commissions of inquiry between the early 1970s to the mid-1990s, chronicling an extraordinary and overlooked history in which virtually disenfranchised peoples forced powerful settler democracies to reckon with their demands. … Fracturing national myths and making new stories of origin necessary, indigenous peoples’ claims challenged settler societies to rethink their sense of belonging.” (Syndetics summary)
Chap. 5. Making a “Partnerhsip between races” : Māori activism and the Treaty of Waitangi.
Chap. 6. The Pacific way. (Aspects of the Whanganui river claim)

Toiapiapi : He huinga o ngā kura pūoro a te Māori = a collection of Māori musical treasures / Hirini Melbourne ; with an introduction by Richard Nunns.
“This 25th anniversary edition contains notes on traditional Maori instruments and lyrics. In Maori and English. Accompanied with a CD and includes an introduction from Richard Nunns. Originally published in 1991”–Publisher information.

Decolonisation in Aotearoa : education, research and practice / edited by Jessica Hutchings and Jenny Lee-Morgan.“This book examines decolonisation and Māori education in Aotearoa New Zealand in ways that seek to challenge, unsettle and provoke for change. Editors Jessica Hutchings and Jenny Lee-Morgan have drawn together leading Māori writers and intellectuals on topics that are at the heart of a decolonising education agenda, from tribal education initiatives to media issues, food sovereignty, wellbeing, Christianity, tikanga and more.”–Back cover.
Writers: Ranginui Walker, Moana Jackson, Ani Mikaere, Sarah-Jane Tiakiwai, Jenny Lee-Morgan, Takawai Murphy, Veronica Tawhai, Leonie Pihama, Mera Lee-Penehira, Āneta Hinemihi Rāwiri, Naomi Simmonds, Kirsten Gabel, Jo Smith, Jessica Hutchings, Ngahuia Murphy, Debbie Broughton.

Syndetics book coverNew Zealand’s rivers : an environmental history / Catherine Knight.
“‘New Zealand s Rivers: An environmental history’ explores the relationship between New Zealanders and their rivers, explaining how they have arrived at a crisis point, where fresh water has become their most contested resource and many rivers are too polluted to swim in. Environmental historian Catherine Knight reveals that the tension between exploitation and enjoyment of rivers is not new. Rivers were treasured by Maori as food baskets and revered as the dwelling places of supernatural creatures. But following European settlement, they became drains for mining, industrial waste and sewage, and were harnessed to generate power and to irrigate farmland. Over time, the utilitarian view of rivers has been increasingly questioned by those who value rivers for recreation as well as for ecological, spiritual and cultural reasons. Today, the sustainable use of rivers is the subject of intense debate. Thoroughly researched and richly illustrated, ‘New Zealand s Rivers’ is an accessible and compelling read for all New Zealanders, including anglers, kayakers, farmers, environmental practitioners, policy-makers, students and anyone with an interest in our environment and history.” (Syndetics summary)
Chap. 2. Māori and awa.
Chap. 11. Asserting mana over rivers.

Syndetics book coverCultural safety in Aotearoa New Zealand / edited by Dianne Wepa.
“In this second edition of Cultural Safety in Aotearoa New Zealand, editor Dianne Wepa presents a range of theoretical and practice-based perspectives adopted by experienced educators who are active in cultural safety education. Thoroughly revised to incorporate the latest methods and research, this edition reflects updates in government policies and nursing practices, and features new chapters on ethical considerations when working cross-culturally, as well as the legislative requirements of the Nursing Council of New Zealand. Each chapter includes key terms and concepts, practice examples providing content from healthcare workers’ everyday experiences, reflective questions to encourage the assimilation of ideas into practice, and references to allow further exploration of the issues discussed. Cultural Safety in Aotearoa New Zealand will equip students, tutors, managers, policy analysts and others involved in the delivery of healthcare with the tools to acknowledge the importance of cultural difference in achieving health and well-being in diverse communities.” (Syndetics summary)
p. 5 Towards cultural safety by Irihapeti Ramsden.
p. 65 Culture and ethnicity : what is the question? by Dianne Wepa.
p. 79 Te Tiriti o Waitangi/Treaty of Waitangi 1840 : its influence on health practice by Denise Wilson and Riripeti Haretuku.
p. 177 Midwifery practice by Katarina Jean Te Huia (including: traditional Māori birthing ; colonisation of Māori birth practices ; the situation today)
p. 235 Māori health : Māori- and whānau-centred practice by Denise Wilson and Huhana Hickey.
p. 252 Nursing and working with disability by Huhana Hickey (includes Māori/indigenous disability identity).

Journal of Pacific archaeology ; vol. 7, no. 2 (2016)
P. 26. Finding meaning and identitiy in New Zealand buildings archaeology : the example of “Parihaka” house, Dunedin by Peter Petchey & Sean Brosnahan.
p. 43. TheTawhiao cottage and the archaeology of race and ethnicity by Matthew Campbell.
p. 59. The source, composition and typology of ‘limestone’ adzes from eastern North Island, New Zealand by Phillip R. Moore & Campbell S. Nelson.
p. 59. Ecological consequences of pre-contact harvesting of Bay of Island fish and shellfish, and other marine taxa, based on midden evidence by John D. Booth.

New Zealand journal of history ; vol. 50, no. 2 (October, 2016)
p. 44. The New Zealand Government’s niupepa and their demise by Lachy Paterson.
p. 68. The politics of history and Waikato-Tainui’s raupatu treaty settlement by Martin Fisher.

Journal of New Zealand literature ; no. 34.1 (2016)
p. 143. Bones rolling under a river : poetry, history and politics in Bill Sewell’s The ballad of fifty-one and Robert Sullivan’s Cassino : city of martyrs/Citta Matire by Airini Beautrais.
p. 207. The Urewera notebook by Katherine Mansfield ; edited by Anna Plumridge / reviewed by Janet Wilson.

Missionaries, education, arts, media, politics : as usual a broad range of subjects touching on Te Ao Māori.

Syndetics book coverMāori art : history, architecture, landscape and theory / Rangihiroa Panoho ; with photographs by Mark Adams & Haruhiko Sameshima.
“Up until now books on Maori art have described the work as either traditional (carving, weaving, painting) or contemporary, work produced post-1950s. This book presents a unique focus on Maori art by exploring the connection between the traditional and contemporary, and the place of Maori art within an international context. Maori Art provides a framework for looking at Maori art in a new way and fills a gap in Maori art history – while there are myriad surveys of Maori art there is currently very little critical writing on Maori art and artists”….(Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverHeke-nuku-mai-nga-iwi Busby : not here by chance / Jeff Evans.
“This biography of Heke-nuku-mai-nga-iwi Busby brings together the varied life experiences that have made Hec Busby the master waka builder, waka expert, celestial navigator and highly regarded Te Rarawa elder that he is today. He is one of the few active waka taua builders and is responsible for the completion of more than a dozen of these waka for iwi around the country… His entrepreneurial and leadership skills along with his tribal and tikanga knowledge have led to his involvement in iwi activities as well as in organising Waitangi commemorations, kapa haka, ocean-going voyages, and waka wananga to pass on his knowledge to the next generation.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe good doctor : breaking the rules, making a difference / Lance O’Sullivan with Margie Thomson.
“Lance O’Sullivan is a man on a mission. Raised in Auckland by a solo mother, he had a modest upbringing typical of the time, if one chequered with difficulties. After being expelled from two schools, Lance could have gone off the rails. Instead, he found his way at Hato Petera College, connecting with his Māori ancestry, and going on to study medicine… For his work, Lance has been acknowledged as a Sir Peter Blake Emerging Leader, Public Health Champion, Māori of the Year and, most recently, Kiwibank New Zealander of the Year. Passionate, brave and free-thinking, Lance stood up when no one else would…”–Publisher information.

Syndetics book coverTauira : Māori methods of learning and teaching / Joan Metge.Based on extensive interviews, this book offers a window on a mid-twentieth-century rural Māori world as described by those who grew up there. Metge’s work tackles important questions about Māori teaching and learning of this period. What was the role of whānau and hapū, household and marae, kaumātua and siblings, work and play? How much learning was practical and how much by teaching?”–Publisher information. Includes bibliographical references and index.
Contents: Chapter 1: Voices from the Past — Chapter 2: Learning as Part of Living — Chapter 3: Teaching and Learning — Chapter 4: Spirituality and Values — Chapter 5: Learning in Maturity as Part of Living — Chapter 6: Storehouses of Knowledge — Chapter 7: Wānanga — Chapter 8: Storytelling — Chapter 9: Learning in the School System — Chapter 10: Educational Practices and Principles.

Syndetics book coverAt the margin of Empire : John Webster and Hokianga, 1841-1900 / Jennifer Ashton.
“Born in Scotland in 1818, John Webster came in New Zealand via Australia in 1841 after narrowly escaping death in the outback following a violent encounter with a group of Aboriginal men. He spent most of the rest of his life in the Hokianga region, carving out a fortune as the region’s leading timber trader and cultivating connections with the leading political figures of the day… Webster was also engaged with Pākehā and the Crown – friends with Frederick Maning, visited by George Grey, Richard Seddon and others… Ashton argues that through his daily interactions, Webster helped slowly shift the balance of power in the North: the credit that he extended to his customers and kin saw them selling land to pay debts, helping push Māori into economic dependence”–Publisher information.

Syndetics book coverEntanglements of empire : missionaries, Māori, and the question of the body / Tony Ballantyne.
“The first Protestant mission to New Zealand, established in 1814, saw the beginning of complex political, cultural, and economic entanglements with Maori. ENTANGLEMENTS OF EMPIRE is a deft reconstruction of the cross-cultural translations of this early period… Maori and missionaries struggled over issues of hygiene, tattooing, clothing, and sexual morality and missionaries found it was difficult to maintain their own practices because of their dependence on Maori chiefly patrons as well as the material constraints and social conflicts. ….” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverPanguru and the city : kāinga tahi, kāinga rua : an urban migration history / Melissa Matutina Williams.
“Travelling from Hokianga to Auckland in the middle decades of the twentieth century, the people of Panguru established themselves in the workplaces, suburbs, churches and schools of the city. Melissa Matutina Williams writes from the heart of these communities. The daughter of a Panguru family growing up in Auckland, she writes a perceptive account of urban migration through the stories of the Panguru migrants. Through these vibrant oral narratives, the history of Maori migration is relocated to the tribal and whanau context in which it occurred. For the people of Panguru, migration was seldom viewed as a one-way journey of new beginnings; it was experienced as a lifelong process of developing a ‘co-existent home place’ for themselves and future generations. Dreams of a brighter future drew on the cultural foundations of a tribal homeland and past. PANGURU AND THE CITY: HE KAINGA RUA traces their negotiations with people and places, from Auckland’s inner-city boarding houses, places of worship and dance halls to workplaces and Maori Affairs’ homes in the suburbs. It is a history that will resonate with Maori from all tribal areas who shared in the quiet task of working against state policies of assimilation, the economic challenges of the 1970s and neoliberal policies of the 1980s in order to develop dynamic Maori community sites and networks which often remained invisible in the cities of Aotearoa New Zealand.” (Syndetics summary)

The brown book : Māori in screen production / written by Dr. Ella Henry and Melissa Wikaire. Contents include: Origins of the Brown Book ; Māori and the screen industry ; working with Māori in screen production ;
Appendices: Māori society ; an overview ; Ngā Aho Whakaari executive members ; Māori production companies ‘ Māori iwi radio stations ‘ pan-tribal organisations ; screen industry organisations ; television broadcasters.

Māori carving : the art of recording Māori history / contributing writers, Malcolm Mulholland and Robyn Bargh.
“This photograph-rich book shows and describes the process of carving, covering the types of materials and tools used, the carving strokes and surface patterns and different regional styles. It shows the range of items carved from meeting houses to musical instruments, waka or canoes, storehouses, weapons and ceremonial items, such as boxes and staffs, and gives detailed information on the carving of wharenui or meeting houses – the epitome of the carver’s art. Information is given on how to read and understand a carving, looking in depth at parts of carvings and what to look for in elements such as the head, arms and hands of figures and the surface patterns used. The patterns and body styles are described and accompanied by detailed photographs that make identification of the elements easy. This is part of a series of four books on aspects of Maōri culture. The others are: Geothermal Treasures: Māori Living with Heat and Steam; Māori Weaving: The Art of Creating Māori Textiles; and Marae: The Heart of Māori Culture”–Publisher information.

Māori weaving : the art of creating Māori textiles / contributing writers, Vanessa Bidois, Cherie Taylor and Robyn Bargh.
“”Since their ancestors arrived in Aotearoa New Zealand and discovered the useful properties of harakeke (New Zealand flax), Maori have used flax leaves to create baskets, mats, housing materials, clothing and cords, ropes and fishing nets. In weaving and the patterns used, Maori record their histories and stories, passing on their culture, genealogy, values and beliefs, weaving together people and communities”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)

Marae : the heart of Māori culture / contributing writers, Malcolm Mulholland and Robyn Bargh.
“”Step-by-step guide to a powhiri, or welcome ceremony, showing and describing what happens, the people involved, what they do, and the values and understandings underpinning the ceremony. There is also a close look at the outside and inside of a wharenui, or meeting house, showing each of the elements and features that make it up. Maori cultural concepts are explained and discussed and a glossary of Maori terms is provided”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)

Geothermal treasures : Māori living with heat and steam / contributing writers, Vanessa Bidois, Cherie Taylor and Robyn Bargh.
“”Natural geothermal phenomena – geysers, hot springs and mud pools – have drawn people to the thermal region of New Zealand for years. Locals and tourists are captivated by the beauty and magic of bubbling mud, steam and hot water gushing from the earth. New Zealand’s world-class geothermal resource is a source of energy, a tourist attraction and a treasure of great historical, cultural, spiritual and economic importance for Maori. In this book, Maori traditional stories, understandings and history stand alongside geothermal science in an exploration of the thermal phenomena of the Volcanic Plateau. Beautiful photographs show the hot pools, rising steam, geysers, bubbling mud and thermal formations that visitors see, and the text provides information about the natural history of the area, its formation and its significance to Maori. This is part of a series of four books on aspects of Maori culture. The others are: Maori Carving: The Art of Preserving Maori History; Maori Weaving: The Art of Creating Maori Textiles; and Marae: The Heart of Maori Culture”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)

Lives of colonial objectives edited by Annabel Cooper, Lachy Paterson and Angela Wanhalla. Otago University Press, 2015.
p. 20. Intimate immensity : a pūtorino in the Peabody Essex Museum by Lucy Mackintosh.
p. 27. Te Haupapa by Pāoria Tapsell
p. 35. Voyaging taonga : the Kīngi tauihi by Kelvin Day.
p. 110. Retrieved from oblivion? Wiremu Kingi Te Rangitaake and the photographic object by Ruth Harvey.
p. 117. ‘A sparrow alone upon the house top’ : the Te Pihoihoi Press by Lachy Paterson.
p. 122. He rau mahara : te wananga ledger by Migoto Eria.
p. 129. Minute books : an integral part of the Māori Land Court by Paerau Warbrick.
p. 134. A road into Te Urewera by Annabel Cooper.
p. 170. Te Tokotoko by Megan Pōtiki.
p. 206. Katherine Mansfield’s hei tiki by Jane Stafford.
p. 212. Te pai o ngā āhua : the visitors’ books at the Lindauer Art Gallery by Roger Blackley.
p. 219. Toko toru tapu : a tale of four churches by Damian Skinner,
p. 231. Māori monument or Pākehā propaganda? the memorial to Keepa Te Rangihiwinui, Whanganui by Ewan Morris.
p. 253. ‘Pōua’s cloak’ : the Haberield family kahu kiwi by Michael J. Stevens.
p. 311. Aferword : ther wharenui Mataatua, and some thoughts about things by Conal McCarthy and Jonathan Mane-Wheoki.

New Zealand government and politics edited by Janine Hayward. 6th ed. OUP, 2015.
p. 4. Māori political history 1860-1960 by Michael J. Stevens.
p. 84. Marxism by Evan Te Ahu Poata-Smith.
p. 240. The Māori Party by Morgan Godfery.
p. 300. The Māori seats by Maria Bargh.
p. 511. Youth engagement by Veronica M. H. Tawhai.

Coutts, Brent and Nicholas Fitness. Protest in New Zealand. Pearson, 2013.
p. 83. Maori resistance to military service.
p. 171. Maori feminist issues

Overland ; issue 219 (Winter,2015)
Features: Anton Blank. Change is the only constant (on gay role models) ; Catriona MacLennan. The ethics of defence (layers and rape trials) ; Fiction: Tina Makereti. Monster ; Poetry: Editorial by Robert Sullivan ; Airini Beautrais. Flow ; Nicole Hawkins. Māori dux ; Reihana Robinson. Terra nullius ; Kiri Piahana-Wong. Hiding ; Apirana Taylor. thank you ; pukana .

Kōrero nehe: te Moana nui a Kiwa, ngā mihinare, pakanga

Histories of the Pacific Ocean, missionaries and the fight for land but the taonga amongst this selection is a beautifully illustrated text (Te Reo Māori) by Keri Kaa, pictures by Martin D. Page.

Syndetics book coverKeeping languages alive : documentation, pedagogy and revitalization / edited by Mari C. Jones and Sarah Ogilvie.
“Many of the world’s languages have diminishing numbers of speakers and are in danger of falling silent. Around the globe, a large body of linguists are collaborating with members of indigenous communities to keep these languages alive. Mindful that their work will be used by future speech communities to learn, teach and revitalise their languages, scholars face new challenges in the way they gather materials and in the way they present their findings. This volume discusses current efforts to record, collect and archive endangered languages in traditional and new media that will support future language learners and speakers. ” (Provided by publisher)

Syndetics book coverPacific histories : ocean, land, people / edited by David Armitage and Alison Bashford.
“The first comprehensive account to place the Pacific Islands, the Pacific Rim and the Pacific Ocean into the perspective of world history. A distinguished international team of historians provides a multidimensional account of the Pacific, its inhabitants and the lands within and around it over 50,000 years, with special attention to the peoples of Oceania. It providing chronological coverage along with analyses of themes such as the environment, migration and the economy; religion, law and science; race, gender and politics.” (Cover)

Syndetics book coverTaka ki rō wai : he kōrero pūrākau mō tētāhi hoiho / ko Keri Kaa, te kaituhi ; ko Martin D. Page, te kaitā pikitia, kaitātai pukapuka.
“A true story about the birth of a foal, set in the small rural community of Rangitukia, on the East Cape of the East Coast, in the North Island of Aotearoa/New Zealand. Reflecting rural Māori life, the story is an observation of the cooperation between animals, and contemplates the magical and the miracle in nature.” (Publisher’s information)

Between the kindling and the blaze : reflections on the concept of mana / Ben Brown.
[This] “is a bold exploration of the concept of mana.  In resonant poetry and short prose poetry, the author does not seek to define mana but rather reflect on its myriad nuances.  “The colour of mana is red they say, from warm sunset tones to bold vigorous and bloody shades of power and authority, the kaka feather, the dog-skin cloak,  the ochre of the earth.  But where is the white of  purity, the certainty of black, the humility of grey?  Colour then, will not suffice in the exploration of mana.  How can a humble man be proud?  Why is the mountain more than a mountain?  How does a river flow in my veins and where is the strenght in silence?  This book is not silent.  It cannot be…” (Back cover)

Te paruhi a ngā tākuta / Nigel Beckford and Mike Fitzsimons, interviews, writing, publishing.
“Tells the story of 27 Māori doctors and students. Some just starting their careers, others reflecting on decades of service, sacrifice and experience. Collectively, these stories span the history of Te Ohu Rata O Aotearoa – Māori Medical Practitioners Association (Te ORA) from trailblazing early Māori GPs to the latest generation of Māori health professionals and learners… Many of the people in this book have challenged New Zealand’s health system and influenced the provision of health services to Māori whānau and communities for the better.” (Back cover)

A desperate dawn : the battle for Turuturu Mokai 1868 / Nigel Ogle and Ron Crosby ; illustrations and photography, Nigel Ogle.
“In July 1868 South Taranaki chief Titokowaru indicated his toughening attitude toward European settlement in his territory by attacking the small military redoubt at Turuturu Mokai. That battle led to a campaign where Maori and Pakeha fought some of the most desperate and violent battles of the New Zealand wars. This book puts the battle into a social, political, technological and historical contecxt.” (Back cover)

Raranga, tino rangatiratanga

There is another mixed bag of topics in the collection this month. An attractive book is Kete whakairo : plaiting flax for beginners, by Maragaret Rose Ngawaka. Every step of the journey is illustrated in colour, and yes, I am sure I could manage these simple techniques.

Syndetics book coverSovereignty : frontiers of possibility / edited by Julie Evans, Ann Genovese, Alexander Reilly, Patrick Wolfe. “Sovereignty’s many dimensions are approached from multiple perspectives and experiences. It is viewed globally as an international question; locally as an issue contested between Natives and settlers; and individually as survival in everyday life.”  (Book cover)

Syndetics book coverInstitutional racism and the dynamics of privilege in public health / Heather Came. “New Zealand has historically prided itself on being a fair and egalitarian society with exemplary race relations. Over time this has proven to be an enduring myth that has stalled the addressing of systemic racism. This comprehensive analysis reveals how the New Zealand government systematically discriminates against Māori in its administration of the public health system.” (Book cover)

Syndetics book coverKete whakairo : plaiting flax for beginners / Margaret Rose Ngawaka. “Raranga has been mistakenly confused with weaving. When weaving is in progress, the warps are worked vertically and the wefts horizontally. Raranga uses the plaiting technique, the warps and wefts are worked diagonally… The word ‘weaving’ has been used for years in raranga and seems to now be accepted among raranga plaiters in New Zealand.” (Adapted from introduction, p. 1.)

Auē Rona / Reihana Robinson. “In this compelling first collection, Reihana Robinson offers a nuanced re-imaging of the Māori Rona legend through lyrical poems of love, transgression and sorrow that flesh out and challenge the archetypal notion of the woman in the moon’–back cover/Janelle Elyse Kihlstrom… “Reihana Robinson has been widely published in New Zealand and internationally. She featured in AUP New Poets 3 (Auckland University Press, 2008) and her work has appeared in anthologies including Te Ao Marama : contemporary Māori writing. Reihana was the inaugural recipient of the Te Atairangikaahu Award for Poetry. She is also an artist and an organic farmer.” (Adapted from book cover)

Syndetics book coverDestiny : the life and times of a self-made apostle / Peter Lineham. “While Destiny Church began in 1998, it rose to notoriety in 2004 with its ‘Enough is Enough’ march against what it deemed society’s declining moral standards. Destiny and its leader Brian Tamaki have since become a significant – if controversial – presence in New Zealand’s religious, political and Māori worlds.” (Book cover)