Whanake Taiao = Environmental Sustainability: Matariki events at Central Library

Matariki 1 JuneOn the four Wednesdays in June, Wellington City Libraries is presenting a series of four events around Whanake Taiao = Environmental Sustainability, at the Central Library, 12.30 pm.

1 June:  Rev. Dr Rosalind Jiko McIntosh – Guide to a thriving future : putting United Nations Sustainable Development Agreement to work for NZ

8 June:  Jessica Hutchings – Hua parakore: kaupapa Māori food sovereignty:  including soil health and composting.

15 June:  Sarah Adams, Cenna Lloyd – Urban agriculture: fruit trees & bees

22 June:  Fred Allen – Matariki celebration of rongoā Māori and native plant remedies

Puanga kai rau. Ka Hua ai ngā pua, koia ko Puanga. =
An abundance of food at Puanga, when the blossoms become fruit, that is Puanga.

orions-matariki

Matariki ahunga nui

More about each event:

Wed 1 June: Rev. Dr Rosalind Jiko McIntosh
For the next 15 years, the United Nations will expand on its kaupapa of 17 major goals set out in a strategy which has been accepted by all nations, September 2015 and which is based on the Millennium Development goals (2000-2015) – find out more about this here: http://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/

In earlier talks at the Central Library, this year, we have heard of the need for clean water (goal 6) and life below water ( 14) but each one of the 17 goals covers an aspect of life at a basic community level – i.e. each one of these goals affects you, and me, in our every day living. Dr Rosalind Jiko McIntosh, a committee member of UNANZ Wellington Branch, retired from a career as a biological sciences research professor to spend the last 20 years in the USA as a social engaged Zen Buddhist.  Rosalind is driven by her experiences, globally, to embrace these kaupapa as pivotal to growing and maintaining healthy local communities.

Matariki 8 June8 June: Jessica Hutchings
jessica-hutchingsHere is Jessica’s recent publication: Te mahi māra : hua parakore – a guide to Māori organic growing.  This book is an amazingly indepth guide to organic gardening, with chapters on a Māori World View, soil and composting, planting, harvesting, rongoā, beekeeping, hens and house cow, and even recipes for using your produce.   You will find an introductory profile here:  http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/sunday/audio/201782628/dr-jessica-hutchings, and here: http://www.foodconference.co.nz/14-15th-february-2015/conference-info/dr-jessica-hutchings/

“Dr. Jessica Hutchings, is from the tribe of Ngai Tahu and is also of Gujarati, India descent. Dr Hutchings is an academic, kaupapa Māori researcher and a Hua Parakore grower.   Dr. Hutchings is actively involved with Te Waka Kai Ora (the National Maori Organics Authority) as a grower; a lead researcher on a three-year research project to develop a tikanga based indigenous verification and validation system for food and agriculture – called Hua Parakore…” (Food Matters conference profile).

Matariki 15 June15 June:  Sarah Adams & Cenna Lloyd

Sarah Adams, Community & Neighbourhood Advisor and Urban Agriculture Advisor at WCC will describe the growing of fruit trees within our city boundaries: there is further information on the Council webpages here: wellington.govt.nz/services/environment-and-waste/environment/urban-agriculture.

Cenna Lloyd from Local Flavour Urban Honey Company will describe beekeeping tips for the city – here is one of the suburban bus stops (Khandallah) portraying the Bee Friendly city.

Bus-Stop-7th-day-front-content

You can see more beekeeping tips on wellington.govt.nz

Matariki 22 juneWed 22 June: Fred Allen
FredallenIn an expansion of his theme, Fred will present his thoughts on Rongoā Māori and native plant remedies within traditional and contemporary paradigms, and subsequent contemporary medicinal developments. Fred Allen is a Rongoā Māori practitioner, New Zealand native herbal medicinal product manufacturer and specialist New Zealand native plant horticulturist. Fred has participated in the NZ Health and Wellness Industry for over 30 years and has invested in development of personal specialist expertise in native flora, NZ biodiversity, ethno botany, phytochemistry and therapeutics of NZ endemic and indigenous herbal medicine.  He identifies and separates his work within both Māori and Western paradigms. He was invited by the South Korean Government to represent New Zealand at the World Traditional Medicine Expo during 2011.

Fred is of Te Atiawa descent, his rohe is Te Whanganui-a-Tara, and he is Managing Director of www.kiwiplants.co.nz and www.kiwiherbs.com.

Matariki

#MatarikiMash – wordplay on twitter for Matariki!

On Mondays and Wednesdays for four weeks from 15 June, we invite you to test your imagination and your skill with language, and help us celebrate Matariki! Inspired by the New Zealand Book Council’s #ramereshorts weekly Twitter competitions, we’ll be running a special word challenge for the 4 weeks of Matariki, every Monday and Wednesday.

Matariki Mash

We’ll post up two te reo Māori kupu those mornings, as well as two English words, and all you need to do, is bring your word play skills and include them in a tweet short story, together with the #MatarikiMash hashtag.

We’ll be retweeting entries through the day as they come in.

Many thanks go to the New Zealand Book Council, for letting us borrow their idea:

New Zealand Book Council

Matariki / Puanga 2015 – what’s on?

It’s time to celebrate the Māori New Year! Here is a great online booklet from Te Taura Whiri i te reo Māori all about Matariki, with great ideas to help us celebrate our indigenous New Year.

Matariki WellingtonWellington City Council also has information about Matariki on their website in both English and Te Reo Māori.

You can also keep track of all the regional events happening across Wellington — 60 free activities and a huge array of talent and showpieces pulled together in one place — on the Matariki Wellington website. I love their front page – it so embodies the spirit of whanaungatanga, aroha, and hūmarietanga!

Matariki Wellington

Also happening over on Twitter for Matariki, from Monday 15 June – Friday 29 July, will be our #MatarikiMash short story competition.

Matariki Mash

On Mondays and Wednesdays for four weeks from 15 June, we wish to test your imagination and your skill with language! Inspired by the New Zealand Book Council’s #ramereshorts weekly Twitter competitions, we’ll be running a special word challenge for the 4 weeks of Matariki, every Monday and Wednesday.

We’ll post up two te reo Māori kupu those mornings, as well as two English words, and all you need to do, is bring your word play skills and include them in a tweet short story, together with the #MatarikiMash hashtag!

Many thanks go to the New Zealand Book Council, for letting us borrow their idea:

New Zealand Book Council

Also, new to our adult collection just in time for Matariki, is this story of Puanga – the constellation of Orion’s belt – which becomes the equivalent of Matariki for those iwi (on the Western, Northern areas of the North Island) who are unable to view Matariki because of it’s low position on the sky’s horizon:

Syndetics book coverPuanga, star of the Māori New Year = Ko Puanga-nui-ā-rangi te whetū mātāmua o te tau hou Māori : nānā i ārahi i ā Matariki tana tuahine tō muri iho / by Sam T. Rerekura

You can find more resources about Matariki and Puanga over on our Matariki page.

Reo, wairua and whenua

John Patterson produces another thought provoking book to add to his well-known writings on Māori values and there’s an interesting clutch of books on aspects of te reo, Puanga, and root vegetables for the garden.

Pacific parables : learning from Māori tradition / John Patterson ; with illustrations by Pat Hanly.
“In this book, John Patterson tries to encourage a more sensitive and sympathetic attitude among Pākehā people by showing how the traditional narratives of the Māori – what we still tend to call their myths and legends – can open our eyes to some of the deeper aspects of Māori philosophical and political thought.”–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverMormon and Maori / Marjorie Newton.
“The New Zealand Mission of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latterday Saints … was really two missions: one conducted among Pakeha (European) New Zealanders, and another among the indigenous people of the islands of Aotearoa/New Zealand … Those assigned to Maori work learned to love a noble, proud, but disgruntled race, a people smarting from the confiscation of their land and their consequent loss of mana … disenchanted with orthodox Christian churches, and whose numbers were shrinking to the point where extinction or amalgamation seemed in the eyes of many Europeans, at the time of the Mormon approach, their only future prospect”–Preface, p. xi-xii.

Te Rongopai 1814 ‘Takoto te pai!’ : bicentenary reflections on Christian beginnings and developments in Aotearoa New Zealand / edited by Allan Davidson, Stuart Lange, Peter Lineham, Adrienne Puckey.
“ll of the essays .. were originally prepared for a conference held at Waitangi, 27-29 November 2012 … The conference aimed to stimulate critical reflection on missionary beginnings in New Zealand and the formative influences of Christianity in early inter-relationships of Māori and Pākehā”–Preface p. 7.

Syndetics book coverMaranga mai! : te reo and marae in crisis? / edited by Merata Kawharu.
“…te reo and tribal marae today seem to be in crisis… without a living language spoken regularly on the marae or in everyday lives, what does the future hold for Māori and for our nation?”–Back cover.
Writers include: Merimeri Penfold, Paul Tapsell, Hōne Sadler, Arapera Ngaha, Margie Hōhepa, Fraser Toi, Stephen McTaggart, Kiri Toki, Merata Kawharu, with Paratene Tane, Pounamu Jade Aikman-Dodd, Michael Hennessy

Syndetics book coverHow to find a taniwha : a deep connection between English and Māori words / Trevor Lloyd.
“Many languages have similar sounds and all have similar semantic elements that make up word meanings. But the existence of the same or equivalent sounds and elements of meaning in many words of two unrelated languages as described in this book, is very surprising and cannot be explained by current linguistic theory”–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverThe value of the Māori language = Te hua o te reo Māori / edited by Rawinia Higgins, Poia Rewi and Vincent Olsen-Reeder.
“This collection of essays in Māori and English explores the actions taken to restore the status of the Māori language, challenges ideas about how the language can be revitalised and looks at approaches to ensure the future of the language. The chapters discuss issues around the Māori Language Act and Crown policy, community initiatives, language development in the education system, and support of Māori language in media”–Back cover.

The new electoral politics in New Zealand : the significance of the 2011 election / edited by Jack Vowles.
p. 141. Māori voters, public policy and privatisation by Ann Sullivan, Martin von Randow and Aimee Matiu.

Syndetics book coverPuanga, star of the Māori New Year = Ko Puanga-nui-ā-rangi te whetū mātāmua o te tau hou Māori : nānā i ārahi i ā Matariki tana tuahine tō muri iho / by Sam T. Rerekura. B.Ed., Dip. Tchg, Dip. Film & TV, Cert. Tertiary Teaching.
“Puanga is the star Rigel in Orion. Most of the tribes of the Māori people in Aotearoa observed Puanga to mark the beginning of the Māori New Year. In Māori mythology he was believed to be the older brother of Matariki. His cosmic rising between May and June in the early morning sky signalled the beginning of winter which is why Māori knew him as the foremost winter star.”–Whakataki, p. 4.

Rauwaru, the proverbial garden : Ngā-weri, Māori root vegetables, their history and tips on their use / Nick Roskruge.
“Root vegetables termed nga-weri in Māori, are classified as ‘root’ crops but can actually be either roots, tubers, swollen stems or even fungi… Vegetables and food crops need to be able to survive through to harvest in this climate and root crops are especially valuable for their ability to store in-ground beyond the life of the plant itself.”–p. ii