Toitū te whenua

There’s a diversity of kaupapa in this handful of books – organic gardening, pacifism of Parihaka, an outline of Māori participation in privatised military industry, stories from Tuhoe kaumatua and kuia, and a collection of research essays and thoughts on the home.

Te mahi māra hua parakore : a Māori food sovereignty handbook / nā Jessica Hutchings.
“”Jessica Hutchings (hua parakore gardener, activist, academic and certified Te Waka Kai Ora grower) explains the political implications of the decisions that we make about growing and eating kai. She encourages us to take control over the food security of our whanau, providing practical advice on how to grow kai in accordance with the kaupapa of hua parakore, inspiring us with stories of hua parakore heroes and reassuring us that becoming a hua parakore gardener is a journey that anyone can embark on”–Back cover.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTe Whiti o Rongomai and the resistance of Parihaka / Danny Keenan.
“This is an account of the life and times of Te Whiti o Rongomai set against the politics and Crown policies of the nineteenth century. It traces the forces that shaped his life’s journey from Ngāmotu, where he was born, to his settling at Parihaka and his evolving sense of the injustices and disempowerment Māori experienced and his response to these. The book discusses the struggles Te Whiti had, as understood by some of his living relatives, against native policy of the time, and it gives insights into the motivations of Te Whiti and his actions. It explores the community at Parihaka, its resistance and the consequences of this and looks at Māori and government actions and responses up to the present day”–Publisher information.

Syndetics book coverA hidden economy : Māori in the privatised military industry / Maria Bargh.
“The Maori economy is often defined simply by the contributions of Maori in New Zealand in the areas of farming, fisheries and forestry. This book explores the ways that Maori in the privatised military industry contribute in monetary and non-monetary ways to the Maori economy. Workers in the privatised military industry very rarely, if ever, give interviews about their work or details about their pay. However, this book includes five interviews with Maori who have worked or are still working in the privatised military industry and explores how they articulate themselves as Maori in the industry, giving a glimpse at this secret world and how Maori operate in it.” (Syndetics summary)

Te ahi kaaroa : Rūātoki kaumātua narratives / Te Manatū Mātauranga o Tūhoe.
“”The Tuhoe Education Authority Te Manatu Matauranga o Tuhoe interviewed kuia and kaumatua in te reo Maori about their lives and experiences”–Publisher information.” (Syndetics summary)
Ngā kaikōrero: George Thrupp, Rangipuke Tari, Tiwi Black, Patu Hale, Maureen Biddle, Kataraina Te Moana.

Syndetics book coverHome : here to stay / edited by Mere Kēpa, Marilyn McPherson and Linitā Manuʻatu.
“This is a collection of twelve academic essays that consider understandings of home and the impact of dominant societies on indigenous societies and their homes. The book covers home and language preservation, homelessness, retention of land, tobacco use in the home, loss of home through trauma and natural disaster, ageing and health, and the meaning of home. This is the third book in the Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga Edited Collections series.”–Publisher information.

Crimson / Marino Blank.

Syndetics book coverA Māori reference grammar / Ray Harlow.
“Based on a third-year university course Ray Harlow taught for a number of years, this grammar reference book is intended for people whose knowledge of Māori is at that level or higher – advanced learners, native speakers and teachers of Māori. The book provides explanations and examples of all the important sentence types of modern Māori. It guides readers progressively from the simple to the more complicated, starting with words and particles, proceeding through simple clauses and sentences to transformations of these and to complex sentences with elaborate internal structure”–Publisher information.

Remembering Parihaka

To acknowledge the village and the people of Parihaka, and to mourn the anniversary of the events which occurred there on November 5 1881, we have compiled a booklist of excellent Parihaka resources, including fiction, non-fiction and children’s books:

Syndetics book coverThe Parihaka woman / Witi Ihimaera.
“There has never been a New Zealand novel quite like The Parihaka Woman. Richly imaginative and original, weaving together fact and fiction, it sets the remarkable story of Erenora against the historical background of the turbulent and compelling events that occurred in Parihaka during the 1870s and 1880s. Parihaka is the place Erenora calls home, a peaceful Taranaki settlement overcome by war and land confiscation. As her world is threatened, Erenora must find within herself the strength, courage and ingenuity to protect those whom she loves. And, like a Shakespearean heroine, she must change herself before she can take up her greatest challenge and save her exiled husband, Horitana. Surprising, inventive and deeply moving, The Parihaka Woman confirms Witi Ihimaera as one of New Zealand’s finest and most memorable storytellers.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverGhosts of Parihaka / David Hair.
“It hasn’t been an easy time for Matiu Douglas, magical adept. One of his friends is now a ghost, his enemies have stolen the Treaty of Waitangi, he can’t date the girl he really likes and he keeps getting unwanted marriage proposals from a dangerous, centuries-old tohunga’s daughter. But when his best friend, Riki, is snatched into the ghost-world of Aotearoa during a school trip, Mat has to put all his other worries aside and act fast. For Riki vanished at Parihaka, scene of one of the darkest acts from New Zealand’s colonial past, and in Aotearoa such places are deadly dangerous” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverAsk that mountain : the story of Parihaka / Dick Scott.
“Parihaka has become a byword for Maori refusal to yield land, culture and dignity to New Zealand’s colonial government. Well after the end of the New Zealand Wars, the people of this small settlement at the foot of Mt Taranaki held out against the encroachments of Pakeha settlers in a struggle that swapped the weapons of war for the weapons of peace.Taking as their symbol the white feather, the chiefs Te Whiti and Tohu led Parihaka in one of the world’s first-recorded campaigns of passive resistance. Maori ploughmen wrote its message across the settlers’ pastures, and Maori fencers underlined the point by throwing barriers across the queen’s highways. Withstanding repeated military action, the spirit of resistance born at Parihaka kept alive the flame of that supposedly ‘dying race’, the Maori.Ask That Mountain draws on official papers, settler manuscripts and oral history to give the first complete account of what took place at Parihaka. Now in its ninth edition, this seminal work was in 1995 named by the Sunday Star-Times as one of the ten most important books published in New Zealand.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe Parihaka album : lest we forget / Rachel Buchanan.
“A photo album doesn’t tell the whole story of a family and this book doesn’t tell the whole story of Parihaka. Rather, it is a collection of snapshots, a patchwork quilt, a scrapbook, a mongrel record my own efforts to understand one of the most important and disturbing events in New Zealand history – the 1881 invasion of Parihaka – and its powerful, complicated legacy. Rachel Buchanan The Parihaka Album: Lest We Forget blends the personal and the historical. It tracks the author Rachel Buchanan’s discovery of her family’s links with Parihaka and her Maori and Pakeha ancestor’s roles in the early days of the city that is now Wellington.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverWanderings with the Mãori prophets, Te Whiti & Tohu (with illustrations of each chief) : being reminiscences of a twelve months’ companionship with them, from their arrival in Christchurch in April 1882, until their return to Parihaka in March 1883 / by John P. Ward.
“Being Reminiscences Of A Twelve Months’ Companionship With Them, From Their Arrival In Christchurch In April 1882, Until Their Return To Parihaka In March, 1883.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverRemember that November / written by Jennifer Beck ; illustrated by Lindy Fisher.
“It’s almost Guy Fawkes Night, and at the school speech competition Andy talks about Guy Fawkes and the Gunpowder Plot. The children cheer excitedly, thinking Andy will win the contest. But then, Aroha gets up, wearing a white feather in her hair, and tells the story of another fifth of November u the invasion of Parihaka in 1881.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverMaumahara ki tērā Nōema / nā Jennifer Beck rāua ko Lindy Fisher ; nā Kawata Teepa i whakamāori.
“It’s almost Guy Fawkes Night, and at the school speech competition Andy talks about Guy Fawkes and the Gunpowder Plot. The children cheer excitedly, thinking Andy will win the contest. But then, Aroha gets up, wearing a white feather in her hair, and tells the story of another fifth of November u the invasion of Parihaka in 1881.” (Syndetics summary)

Ruakere Hond, Acushla Dee O’Carroll

It’s a long, long trail winding mai i Te Upoko o te Ika ā Māui ki Parihaka, but on Saturday 17 May,  my heart’s right there.

A ‘post-graduate gathering’ began with a powhiri at 12:30, at Te Paepae o Te Raukura, as friends, fellow students and devoted whānau came together to celebrate the achievements of Mr Taranaki Reo, aka, Ruakere Hond, and Acushla Dee O’Carroll, Gen SMS, who received their PhDs at Massey, Palmerston North on Friday 16 May.

Parihaka Pa, South Taranaki Region
Parihaka Pa, South Taranaki Region. Collis, William Andrews, 1853-1920 :Negatives of Taranaki. Ref: 1/1-012046-G. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23187188

Research findings were presented at Te Niho o Te Ati Awa – and we were fittingly welcomed by Ngapera and her rōpū, with the twirling poi and chant of E rere rā, into this historic house.

A the short profile of the busy life of Dee is available on the Massey site:

“Dee, who grew up in Te Hawera, Taranaki (her iwi affiliations are Ngaruahine Rangi, Ngāti Ruanui and Te Āti Awa), is a member of the College of Health’s Whariki Research Centre at the School of Public Health. She is investigating how Māori and other indigenous cultures use social media.”

News of Dee’s Fulbright-Harkness award and plans for studying in Hawaii and USA, last year, was delivered on Te Karere:

Saturday’s citation of Dee O’Carroll’s research paper was “Kanohi ki te kanohi : a thing of the past? An examination of social networking sites and the implications for Māori culture and society.”

The thesis is available at here.

Through mainly qualitative exploration of [these] data, the domains of rangatahi (Māori) usage, whanaungatanga, tuakiritanga [identity] and tikanga were traversed, to interrogate the contemporary ideas and trajectory of kanohi ki te kanohi values. The study highlights the range of issues that Māoridom must grapple with to guide SNS usage in cultural contexts that considers kanohi ki te kanohi values and the future of marae.” – pānui for gathering of 17/5/2014

This fascinating research scratches the surface of SNS. There are implications for young Māori (initially) but then for all of us, as social networking sweeps across our traditional ways of interaction.

Relevant to the kōrero, is the realisation that Ngāti Porou have already streamed live the tangi of three beloved mātua: Dr Pat Ngata, and his father, and Parekura Horomia. What changes will this type of ‘interaction’ bring to protocols and the sustaining of our marae in the future?
Articles by Dee available at Wellington Central Library and through online access are:
O’Carroll, A. (2013). Maori identity construction in Social Networking Sites. International Journal of Critical Indigenous Studies., 6(2), 2-16.
O’Carroll, A.D. (2013). Virtual whanaungatanga – Māori utilising social networking sites to attain and maintain relationships. AlterNative 9(3), 230-245. A326
O’Carroll, A.D. (2013). An analysis of how Rangatahi Maori use social networking sites. Mai Journal, 2(1), 46-59. A327

RUAKERE HOND

Tenā koutou taku nui, taku rahi kei te kūreitanga o Taranaki nei puta atu ki ōna pāranga huhua noa.
“My whānau connections are Taranaki. I firmly believe the distinctive form of our local language, culture and history is a critical factor for Taranaki Māori communities to be fully engaged in education. I have been keenly involved with adult education in the community and institutions since the 1980’s, especially in reo Māori immersion teaching and community development. It is inspiring to see the progress of Māori studies in WITT, which continues to be innovative and forward thinking. This supports WITT in being a pivotal facilitator of significant social, cultural and economic achievement in Taranaki by working alongside community initiatives and playing a major part in responding to local aspirations for growth and development.
Heoti anō rā e ōku karangamaha, rarau mai ki tēnei puna mātauranga. Mā wai kē te puna nei e hurahura? Māu, māku, mā tātou!”

But for many years now, Ruakere Hond’s name has been synonymous with Taranaki revitalisation of Te Reo. The man stands as a colossus in his chosen field of endeavour, and at last he has found the missing link between public health, communities and society.
In his thesis, entitled Matua te Reo, Matua te Tangata : Speaker community : visions, approaches, outcomes, Ruakere shows how he was at a loss to understand why his apparently sound understanding and development of revitalisation processes were not having the success he had anticipated.

It was not until he began to define community as opposed to society and to understand the implications of sustainable health outcomes and the need to establish secure cultural identity that Ruakere began to move more positively towards achieving his goals of reo revitalisation.

Parihaka kōrero

Parihaka Talk Photos 009
He honore, he kororia, he maungarongo ki te whenua
He whaakaro pai ki nga tangata katoa.
(Te Whiti o Rongomai)

On Wednesday, 7 November 2012, Wellington City Libraries was honoured to host a kōrero by Neavin Broughton on the Pāhuatanga o Parihaka : subtitled “He wai kei aku kamo = with tears in my eyes”.

Neavin unfolded the story of the mountains – Taranaki maunga’s departure for the Taranaki rohe rather than engage in a battle for the hand of the beautiful Pīhanga, (in, Legends of Aotearoa by Chris Winitana). This whakaaro became a guiding kaupapa for ngā iwi o Taranaki : in the face of conflict – remove yourself from the turmoil.

Maybe we lost our way during to the times of Titokowaru mā, [Riseborough, Hazel. Days of darkness] but under the influence of Te Whiti and Tohu we were turned again to the kaupapa of peaceful resistance, in the face of colonial attempts to gain a foothold on the fertile pastures of Taranaki. On that final day, 5 November 1881, it was the Tatarakihi (http://www.nzff.co.nz/film/tatarakihi)
and wāhine who faced off as the front row of passive resistance against the invading Bryce, volunteers and constabulary troops.

And so the stories continued, with the accounts of our men sent to Wellington, then Otago for the hard labour in horrific conditions. Good works arose in Dunedin – bridges and causeways were created by the hands of our tūpuna.

In Wellington, just in the last few weeks, we have noted the uncovering, below the carillion, of walls using our tūpuna prisoners’ hand-made bricks.

We were honoured, last Wednesday, to have amongst us, Peter Moeahu His response to a question from the floor – “How do I visit Parihaka”, was simply – “Come with love”.

Wellington City Libraries were overwhelmed by the public interest and response. We estimate that 100 people attended this kōrero. We received many expressions of support for the manner and expertise of Neavin’s delivery . He mihi atu ki a korua ko Pekaira.

Syndetics book coverThe Parihaka album : lest we forget / Rachel Buchanan.
In a previous blog, I omitted one of our more recent histories of Parihaka, written by Rachel Buchanan – The Parihaka album – lest we forget” which retells personal stories and creates an historical dimension to Parihaka from her very own whānau. Please take the time to read these stories.

Syndetics book coverThe Parihaka woman : an epic story of love and war / Witi Ihimaera.
Witi Ihimaera has based a fictional story on Parihaka in which he weaves facts of Parihaka in the 1870s and 1880s against a fictional tale of Erenora and Horitana.

Syndetics book cover
Syndetics book cover
Also published by Huia, this month, in both English and Te Reo Māori, is a children’s book, written by Jennifer Beck – “Maumahara ki tērā Nōema” and “Remember that November”. Aroha, for her speech competition, tells the story or Parihaka through a child’s eyes wheras another classmate outlines the story of Guy Fawkes.

Tā moko

Tattooing seems to be a flavour of the month. There is a beautifully illustrated book of over 20 tattooists – including artists of tā moko, and tatau. As well, there are theses by Rawinia Higgins and Ridgely Dunn.

Syndetics book coverMai i te kākano / nā Hēni Jacob.
“Mai i te Kākano aims to help Māori language speakers and learners sustain more animated, in-depth conversations in Māori. It gives examples of alternative and fun ways to say things in everyday situations. Included are sections on Māori idiom and metaphor, common errors, useful phrases, and examples of language in use in a vaiety of settings, including in the home, at the supermarket, at the beach, and on the sports field”–back cover.

Syndetics book coverTū / nā Patricia Grace ; nā Wiremu rāua ko Te Ohorere Kaa i whakamāori.
“The only survivor of three young men who went to war from his family, Tū faces the past and tells his niece and nephew, through the pages of his war journal, what really happened to the brothers as the Māori Battalion fought the war in Italy”–Publisher information. This is the Te Reo version of Patricia Graces’ narrative of the story of Tu.

Syndetics book coverNew Zealand tattoo : in the home of the tattooist’s art / Chris Hoult ; text by Steve Forbes” [This book] presents the view from a cross-section of tattoo studios in 2012. Featuring photography of the tattooists and the tattooed, it profiles over 20 leading artists and gives insights into both the history and the renaissance of all three traditions: tā moko (Māori tattoo), tatau (Pacific Islands tattoo) and tattoo (European and Asian forms)”.–back cover.

Syndetics book coverIf I only had time / John Rowles with Angus Gillies.
“Here [John Rowles] speaks candidly with Angus Gillies, noting the tremendous achievements as well as the pressures and mishaps along the way. An irrepressible optimist, John tells a story that’s full of humour and is hard to put down.”–inside jacket. An easy read, but fascinating tale of the boy from Kawerau who made it to London, Las Vegas, Hawai’i and everywhere in between.

Syndetics book coverArt New Zealand ; no. 144 (Summer 2012-13)
p. 52. Waharua kopito : Māori cloaks at Te Papa by Peter Ireland.

(Kahu ora = living cloaks)-
“Fautlessly crafted by curator Awhina Tamarapa, Kahu ora manifests what was made plain by her scholarly accessible, beautifully designed and produced book, Whatu kakahu / Maori cloaks published last year – where eight specialist pooled their knowledge to give the most comprehensive account to date of this key strand of Maori culture”–p. 52-3.(Te Papa )

Historical review (Bay of Plenty journal of history) ; vol. 60, no. 2 ; (November 2012)
p. 49. Saving Te Urewera heritage by Dean Flavell
p. 52. Mataatua wharenui : the long journey home by Dr Ian Shearer
p. 55. Te Koputu a Te Whanga a Toi, Whakatane Library and Exhibition Centre

Five Theses:
Village of peace, village of war : Parihaka stories 1881-2004 / Rachel Anne Buchanan.

Conceptualising wairuatanga : rituals, relevance and realities for teachers : a dissertation in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Teaching and Learning in the University of Canterbury / by Gipsy Foster.

Poia mai taku poi : unearthing the knowledge of the past : a critical review of written literature on the poi in New Zealand and the Pacific : a thesis submitted for the degree of Master of Arts at the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand / Karyn Ailsa Paringatai.
The primary objective of this thesis is to review literature written about poi in order to construct an historical overview of poi from pre-contact Māori society until the 1920s. The mythological and Polynesian origins of poi, traditional and contemporary materials and methods used to make poi, early travellers, explorers, and settlers accounts of poi and two case studies on the use of poi in the Taranaki and Te Arawa areas will be included in this thesis. The information will be used to show the changes in poi that have occured since Māori and European arrival to New Zealand until the 1920s.

He tānga ngutu, he Tūhoetanga te Mana Motuhake o te tā moko wāhine: the identity politics of moko kauae : a thesis submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand / by Rawinia R. Higgins.
Tā moko (Māori tattooing), especially facial moko (tattoo), has become a popular mechanism for the expression of self determination. Many Māori people are adopting this art form as part of a renaissance of Māori culture in Aotearoa/New Zealand. This declaration of Māori self-determination is also an assertion of the pride felt by the tangata whenua (people of the land) for their culture, their language and more, importantly, their identity. This thesis will illustrate how moko kauae (female chin tattooing) is a means of expressing Māori identity with specific reference to Tūhoe identity. Using an Indigenous theoretical framework this Māori Studies thesis examines the historical and contemporary political dimensions of moko kauae, the interface with the Māori worldview (inclusive of its cultural concepts), and its relationship to identity politics. This will be complimented by the personal stories of Tūhoe women who have undertaken moko kauae as well as commentaries from other Tūhoe people who express what their Tūhoetanga means to them and their lives.

Challenging appropriation : modern moko and western subculture / by Ridgely Dunn.

Re-colonisation and indigenous resistance : neoliberalism in the Pacific / Ema Maria Bargh.