He waka eke noa

I te marama nei : he whakamātau hinengaro, he mana whakairo hinengaro, he mana motuhake, he wai māori, i te ao hurihuri : indigenous issues of psychology, intellectual property rights, water rights, in the evolving world.

Syndetics book coverThe Māori meeting house : introducing the whare whakairo / Damian Skinner.
“This all-new guide to the whare whakairo, or decorated Maori meeting house, covers every aspect of these treasures–their history and evolution, structure and art forms, and symbolism and cultural significance. With more than a hundred intriguing historical and contemporary photographs, and containing dozens of diagrams and a helpful glossary, the book clearly illustrates the parts, and the arts, of the whare whakairo with reference to numerous meeting houses from all over Aotearoa New Zealand and the world… The Maori Meeting House makes an important contribution to contemporary discussions about indigenous art history and taonga Maori.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverArtefacts of encounter : Cook’s voyages, colonial collecting and museum histories / edited by Nicholas Thomas, Julie Adams, Billie Lythberg, Maia Nuku & Amiria Salmond ; photography by Gwil Owen.
“The Pacific artefacts and works of art collected during the three voyages of Captain James Cook and the navigators, traders and missionaries who followed him are of foundational importance for the study of art and culture in Oceania… The Cook voyage collection at the MAA is among the four or five most important in the world, containing over 200 of the 2000-odd objects with Cook voyage provenance that are dispersed throughout the world. This stunning book catalogues this collection, and its cutting-edge scholarship sheds new light on the significance of many artefacts of encounter.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverIndigenous notions of ownership and libraries, archives and museums / edited by Camille Callison, Loriene Roy and Gretchen Alice LeCheminant.
“Forms of indigenous knowledges and cultural expressions are found in libraries, archives or museums. Often the “legal” copyright is not held by the indigenous people’s groups, who believe that the true expression of their culture can only be sustained and remain dynamic in its proper cultural context. The aim is to respect these ways of knowing while appreciating the cultural memory institutions’ attempts to transmit them to the next generation.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverTupuna awa : people and politics of the Waikato River / Marama Muru-Lanning.
“‘We have always owned the water . . . we have never ceded our mana over the river to anyone’, King Tuheitia Paki asserted in 2012. Prime Minister John Key disagreed: ‘King Tuheitia’s claim that Maori have always owned New Zealand’s water is just plain wrong’. So who does own the water in New Zealand – if anyone – and why does it matter? By examining the debates over water in one New Zealand river, over a single recent period, Muru-Lanning provides a powerful lens through which to view modern iwi politics, debates over water ownership, and contests for power between Maori and the state.” (Adapted from Syndetics summary)

Te manu kai i te mātauranga : indigenous psychology in Aotearoa/New Zealand / Waikaremoana Waitoki & Michelle Levy, editors.
Contents: Foreword: Ka awatea / Michelle Levy & Waikaremoana Waitoki — Introduction: My name is Ripeka / Waikaremoana Waitoki — Chapter 1: Kaupapa Māori psychologies / Michelle Levy — Chapter 2: A ripple of intimacy with creation : the stone bird of sorrow / Virginia Tamanui — Chapter 3: Whanaungatanga : asking who you are; not, what you are / Maynard Gilgen and Māmari Stephens — Chapter 4: Te toka tū moana : resilience, love and hope / Ainsleigh Cribb-Su’a & Hilda Te Pania-Hemopo — Chapter 5: Healing whānau violence : a love story / Erana Cooper & Sharon Rickard — Chapter 6: Re : “I just want to heal my family” / Lisa Cherrington — Chapter 7: Ngā rākau a te pākehā : Matiu’s story / Simon Bennett — Chapter 8: A new moon : talking story with Ripeka to support the healing of soul wounds / Melissa Taitimu — Chapter 9: Wairuatanga / Hukarere Valentine — Chapter 10: ‘Haerenga ki waiora’ : my experience of inpatient mental health services / Julie Wharewera-Mika — Chapter 11: Māori and neuropsychological assessment / Margaret Dudley — Chapter 12: He wāhine āwhina : a healing narrative of end of life care / Tess Moeke-Maxwell — Chapter 13: A partnered approach to psychological assessment : he ritenga whaimōhio / Sonja Macfarlane — Chapter 14: Kaihau waiū : attributes gained through mother’s milk : the importance of our very first relationship / Tania Cargo — Chapter 15: He kākano mai I rangiātea / Bridgette Masters-Awatere — Chapter 16: Ngā kete mātauranga : a curriculum for an indigenous psychology / Waikaremoana Waitoki.

Syndetics book coverThe Great War for New Zealand : Waikato 1800-2000 / Vincent O’Malley.
“A monumental new account of the defining conflict in New Zealand history. It was war in the Waikato in 1863-64 that shaped the nation in all kinds of ways: setting back Māori and Pākehā relations by several generations and allowing the government to begin to assert the kind of real control over the country that had eluded it since 1840. Spanning nearly two centuries from first contact through to settlement and apology, Vincent O’Malley focuses on the human impact of the war, its origins and aftermath. Based on many years of research and illustrated throughout, The Great War for New Zealand is a groundbreaking book written in the conviction that a nation needs to own its history.” (Publisher information)

E ngā uri whakatupu : weaving legacies : Dame Rangimarie Hetet and Diggeress Te Kanawa / authors, Ngahuia Te Awekotuku, Kahutoi Mere Te Kanawa, Rangituatahi Te Kanawa, Barbara Pareatai Moke.
“Describes the Waikato Museum Te Whare Taonga o Waikato exhibition, ‘E nga uri whakatupu, Weaving legacies : Dame Rangimarie Hetet and Diggeress Rangituatahi Te Kanawa’, which ran from 29th June 2014 to 28th July 2015 and was the most significant collection of Maori korowai and weaving ever shown in Aotearoa New Zealand. Includes a waiata composed by Dame Rangimarie Hetet.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverJourney to a hanging / Peter Wells.
“Part history, part biography, part social commentary, this fascinating book is about infamous events that shook New Zealand to its core. In 1865, Rev Carl Sylvius Volkner was hanged, his head cut off, his eyes eaten and his blood drunk from his church chalice. One name – Kereopa Te Rau (Kaiwhatu: The Eye-eater) – became synonymous with the murder. In 1871 he was captured, tried and sentenced to death. But then something remarkable happened. Sister Aubert and William Colenso – two of the greatest minds in colonial New Zealand – came to his defence. Regardless, Kereopa Te Rau was hanged in Napier Prison. But even a century and a half later, the events have not been laid to rest. Peter Wells travels back into an antipodean heart of darkness and illuminates how we try to make sense of the past, how we heal, remember – and forget.” (Syndetics summary)

Syndetics book coverThe land is our history : indigeneity, law, and the settler state / Miranda Johnson.
The Land Is Our History tells the story of indigenous legal activism at a critical political and cultural juncture in Australia, Canada, and New Zealand. In the late 1960s, indigenous activists protested assimilation policies and the usurpation of their lands as a new mining boom took off, radically threatening their collective identities. Often excluded from legal recourse in the past, indigenous leaders took their claims to court with remarkable results… Miranda Johnson examines how indigenous peoples advocated for themselves in courts and commissions of inquiry between the early 1970s to the mid-1990s, chronicling an extraordinary and overlooked history in which virtually disenfranchised peoples forced powerful settler democracies to reckon with their demands. … Fracturing national myths and making new stories of origin necessary, indigenous peoples’ claims challenged settler societies to rethink their sense of belonging.” (Syndetics summary)
Chap. 5. Making a “Partnerhsip between races” : Māori activism and the Treaty of Waitangi.
Chap. 6. The Pacific way. (Aspects of the Whanganui river claim)

Toiapiapi : He huinga o ngā kura pūoro a te Māori = a collection of Māori musical treasures / Hirini Melbourne ; with an introduction by Richard Nunns.
“This 25th anniversary edition contains notes on traditional Maori instruments and lyrics. In Maori and English. Accompanied with a CD and includes an introduction from Richard Nunns. Originally published in 1991”–Publisher information.

Decolonisation in Aotearoa : education, research and practice / edited by Jessica Hutchings and Jenny Lee-Morgan.“This book examines decolonisation and Māori education in Aotearoa New Zealand in ways that seek to challenge, unsettle and provoke for change. Editors Jessica Hutchings and Jenny Lee-Morgan have drawn together leading Māori writers and intellectuals on topics that are at the heart of a decolonising education agenda, from tribal education initiatives to media issues, food sovereignty, wellbeing, Christianity, tikanga and more.”–Back cover.
Writers: Ranginui Walker, Moana Jackson, Ani Mikaere, Sarah-Jane Tiakiwai, Jenny Lee-Morgan, Takawai Murphy, Veronica Tawhai, Leonie Pihama, Mera Lee-Penehira, Āneta Hinemihi Rāwiri, Naomi Simmonds, Kirsten Gabel, Jo Smith, Jessica Hutchings, Ngahuia Murphy, Debbie Broughton.

Syndetics book coverNew Zealand’s rivers : an environmental history / Catherine Knight.
“‘New Zealand s Rivers: An environmental history’ explores the relationship between New Zealanders and their rivers, explaining how they have arrived at a crisis point, where fresh water has become their most contested resource and many rivers are too polluted to swim in. Environmental historian Catherine Knight reveals that the tension between exploitation and enjoyment of rivers is not new. Rivers were treasured by Maori as food baskets and revered as the dwelling places of supernatural creatures. But following European settlement, they became drains for mining, industrial waste and sewage, and were harnessed to generate power and to irrigate farmland. Over time, the utilitarian view of rivers has been increasingly questioned by those who value rivers for recreation as well as for ecological, spiritual and cultural reasons. Today, the sustainable use of rivers is the subject of intense debate. Thoroughly researched and richly illustrated, ‘New Zealand s Rivers’ is an accessible and compelling read for all New Zealanders, including anglers, kayakers, farmers, environmental practitioners, policy-makers, students and anyone with an interest in our environment and history.” (Syndetics summary)
Chap. 2. Māori and awa.
Chap. 11. Asserting mana over rivers.

Syndetics book coverCultural safety in Aotearoa New Zealand / edited by Dianne Wepa.
“In this second edition of Cultural Safety in Aotearoa New Zealand, editor Dianne Wepa presents a range of theoretical and practice-based perspectives adopted by experienced educators who are active in cultural safety education. Thoroughly revised to incorporate the latest methods and research, this edition reflects updates in government policies and nursing practices, and features new chapters on ethical considerations when working cross-culturally, as well as the legislative requirements of the Nursing Council of New Zealand. Each chapter includes key terms and concepts, practice examples providing content from healthcare workers’ everyday experiences, reflective questions to encourage the assimilation of ideas into practice, and references to allow further exploration of the issues discussed. Cultural Safety in Aotearoa New Zealand will equip students, tutors, managers, policy analysts and others involved in the delivery of healthcare with the tools to acknowledge the importance of cultural difference in achieving health and well-being in diverse communities.” (Syndetics summary)
p. 5 Towards cultural safety by Irihapeti Ramsden.
p. 65 Culture and ethnicity : what is the question? by Dianne Wepa.
p. 79 Te Tiriti o Waitangi/Treaty of Waitangi 1840 : its influence on health practice by Denise Wilson and Riripeti Haretuku.
p. 177 Midwifery practice by Katarina Jean Te Huia (including: traditional Māori birthing ; colonisation of Māori birth practices ; the situation today)
p. 235 Māori health : Māori- and whānau-centred practice by Denise Wilson and Huhana Hickey.
p. 252 Nursing and working with disability by Huhana Hickey (includes Māori/indigenous disability identity).

Journal of Pacific archaeology ; vol. 7, no. 2 (2016)
P. 26. Finding meaning and identitiy in New Zealand buildings archaeology : the example of “Parihaka” house, Dunedin by Peter Petchey & Sean Brosnahan.
p. 43. TheTawhiao cottage and the archaeology of race and ethnicity by Matthew Campbell.
p. 59. The source, composition and typology of ‘limestone’ adzes from eastern North Island, New Zealand by Phillip R. Moore & Campbell S. Nelson.
p. 59. Ecological consequences of pre-contact harvesting of Bay of Island fish and shellfish, and other marine taxa, based on midden evidence by John D. Booth.

New Zealand journal of history ; vol. 50, no. 2 (October, 2016)
p. 44. The New Zealand Government’s niupepa and their demise by Lachy Paterson.
p. 68. The politics of history and Waikato-Tainui’s raupatu treaty settlement by Martin Fisher.

Journal of New Zealand literature ; no. 34.1 (2016)
p. 143. Bones rolling under a river : poetry, history and politics in Bill Sewell’s The ballad of fifty-one and Robert Sullivan’s Cassino : city of martyrs/Citta Matire by Airini Beautrais.
p. 207. The Urewera notebook by Katherine Mansfield ; edited by Anna Plumridge / reviewed by Janet Wilson.

Reo, wairua and whenua

John Patterson produces another thought provoking book to add to his well-known writings on Māori values and there’s an interesting clutch of books on aspects of te reo, Puanga, and root vegetables for the garden.

Pacific parables : learning from Māori tradition / John Patterson ; with illustrations by Pat Hanly.
“In this book, John Patterson tries to encourage a more sensitive and sympathetic attitude among Pākehā people by showing how the traditional narratives of the Māori – what we still tend to call their myths and legends – can open our eyes to some of the deeper aspects of Māori philosophical and political thought.”–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverMormon and Maori / Marjorie Newton.
“The New Zealand Mission of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latterday Saints … was really two missions: one conducted among Pakeha (European) New Zealanders, and another among the indigenous people of the islands of Aotearoa/New Zealand … Those assigned to Maori work learned to love a noble, proud, but disgruntled race, a people smarting from the confiscation of their land and their consequent loss of mana … disenchanted with orthodox Christian churches, and whose numbers were shrinking to the point where extinction or amalgamation seemed in the eyes of many Europeans, at the time of the Mormon approach, their only future prospect”–Preface, p. xi-xii.

Te Rongopai 1814 ‘Takoto te pai!’ : bicentenary reflections on Christian beginnings and developments in Aotearoa New Zealand / edited by Allan Davidson, Stuart Lange, Peter Lineham, Adrienne Puckey.
“ll of the essays .. were originally prepared for a conference held at Waitangi, 27-29 November 2012 … The conference aimed to stimulate critical reflection on missionary beginnings in New Zealand and the formative influences of Christianity in early inter-relationships of Māori and Pākehā”–Preface p. 7.

Syndetics book coverMaranga mai! : te reo and marae in crisis? / edited by Merata Kawharu.
“…te reo and tribal marae today seem to be in crisis… without a living language spoken regularly on the marae or in everyday lives, what does the future hold for Māori and for our nation?”–Back cover.
Writers include: Merimeri Penfold, Paul Tapsell, Hōne Sadler, Arapera Ngaha, Margie Hōhepa, Fraser Toi, Stephen McTaggart, Kiri Toki, Merata Kawharu, with Paratene Tane, Pounamu Jade Aikman-Dodd, Michael Hennessy

Syndetics book coverHow to find a taniwha : a deep connection between English and Māori words / Trevor Lloyd.
“Many languages have similar sounds and all have similar semantic elements that make up word meanings. But the existence of the same or equivalent sounds and elements of meaning in many words of two unrelated languages as described in this book, is very surprising and cannot be explained by current linguistic theory”–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverThe value of the Māori language = Te hua o te reo Māori / edited by Rawinia Higgins, Poia Rewi and Vincent Olsen-Reeder.
“This collection of essays in Māori and English explores the actions taken to restore the status of the Māori language, challenges ideas about how the language can be revitalised and looks at approaches to ensure the future of the language. The chapters discuss issues around the Māori Language Act and Crown policy, community initiatives, language development in the education system, and support of Māori language in media”–Back cover.

The new electoral politics in New Zealand : the significance of the 2011 election / edited by Jack Vowles.
p. 141. Māori voters, public policy and privatisation by Ann Sullivan, Martin von Randow and Aimee Matiu.

Syndetics book coverPuanga, star of the Māori New Year = Ko Puanga-nui-ā-rangi te whetū mātāmua o te tau hou Māori : nānā i ārahi i ā Matariki tana tuahine tō muri iho / by Sam T. Rerekura. B.Ed., Dip. Tchg, Dip. Film & TV, Cert. Tertiary Teaching.
“Puanga is the star Rigel in Orion. Most of the tribes of the Māori people in Aotearoa observed Puanga to mark the beginning of the Māori New Year. In Māori mythology he was believed to be the older brother of Matariki. His cosmic rising between May and June in the early morning sky signalled the beginning of winter which is why Māori knew him as the foremost winter star.”–Whakataki, p. 4.

Rauwaru, the proverbial garden : Ngā-weri, Māori root vegetables, their history and tips on their use / Nick Roskruge.
“Root vegetables termed nga-weri in Māori, are classified as ‘root’ crops but can actually be either roots, tubers, swollen stems or even fungi… Vegetables and food crops need to be able to survive through to harvest in this climate and root crops are especially valuable for their ability to store in-ground beyond the life of the plant itself.”–p. ii

Kōrero nehe: te Moana nui a Kiwa, ngā mihinare, pakanga

Histories of the Pacific Ocean, missionaries and the fight for land but the taonga amongst this selection is a beautifully illustrated text (Te Reo Māori) by Keri Kaa, pictures by Martin D. Page.

Syndetics book coverKeeping languages alive : documentation, pedagogy and revitalization / edited by Mari C. Jones and Sarah Ogilvie.
“Many of the world’s languages have diminishing numbers of speakers and are in danger of falling silent. Around the globe, a large body of linguists are collaborating with members of indigenous communities to keep these languages alive. Mindful that their work will be used by future speech communities to learn, teach and revitalise their languages, scholars face new challenges in the way they gather materials and in the way they present their findings. This volume discusses current efforts to record, collect and archive endangered languages in traditional and new media that will support future language learners and speakers. ” (Provided by publisher)

Syndetics book coverPacific histories : ocean, land, people / edited by David Armitage and Alison Bashford.
“The first comprehensive account to place the Pacific Islands, the Pacific Rim and the Pacific Ocean into the perspective of world history. A distinguished international team of historians provides a multidimensional account of the Pacific, its inhabitants and the lands within and around it over 50,000 years, with special attention to the peoples of Oceania. It providing chronological coverage along with analyses of themes such as the environment, migration and the economy; religion, law and science; race, gender and politics.” (Cover)

Syndetics book coverTaka ki rō wai : he kōrero pūrākau mō tētāhi hoiho / ko Keri Kaa, te kaituhi ; ko Martin D. Page, te kaitā pikitia, kaitātai pukapuka.
“A true story about the birth of a foal, set in the small rural community of Rangitukia, on the East Cape of the East Coast, in the North Island of Aotearoa/New Zealand. Reflecting rural Māori life, the story is an observation of the cooperation between animals, and contemplates the magical and the miracle in nature.” (Publisher’s information)

Between the kindling and the blaze : reflections on the concept of mana / Ben Brown.
[This] “is a bold exploration of the concept of mana.  In resonant poetry and short prose poetry, the author does not seek to define mana but rather reflect on its myriad nuances.  “The colour of mana is red they say, from warm sunset tones to bold vigorous and bloody shades of power and authority, the kaka feather, the dog-skin cloak,  the ochre of the earth.  But where is the white of  purity, the certainty of black, the humility of grey?  Colour then, will not suffice in the exploration of mana.  How can a humble man be proud?  Why is the mountain more than a mountain?  How does a river flow in my veins and where is the strenght in silence?  This book is not silent.  It cannot be…” (Back cover)

Te paruhi a ngā tākuta / Nigel Beckford and Mike Fitzsimons, interviews, writing, publishing.
“Tells the story of 27 Māori doctors and students. Some just starting their careers, others reflecting on decades of service, sacrifice and experience. Collectively, these stories span the history of Te Ohu Rata O Aotearoa – Māori Medical Practitioners Association (Te ORA) from trailblazing early Māori GPs to the latest generation of Māori health professionals and learners… Many of the people in this book have challenged New Zealand’s health system and influenced the provision of health services to Māori whānau and communities for the better.” (Back cover)

A desperate dawn : the battle for Turuturu Mokai 1868 / Nigel Ogle and Ron Crosby ; illustrations and photography, Nigel Ogle.
“In July 1868 South Taranaki chief Titokowaru indicated his toughening attitude toward European settlement in his territory by attacking the small military redoubt at Turuturu Mokai. That battle led to a campaign where Maori and Pakeha fought some of the most desperate and violent battles of the New Zealand wars. This book puts the battle into a social, political, technological and historical contecxt.” (Back cover)

Tā moko

Tattooing seems to be a flavour of the month. There is a beautifully illustrated book of over 20 tattooists – including artists of tā moko, and tatau. As well, there are theses by Rawinia Higgins and Ridgely Dunn.

Syndetics book coverMai i te kākano / nā Hēni Jacob.
“Mai i te Kākano aims to help Māori language speakers and learners sustain more animated, in-depth conversations in Māori. It gives examples of alternative and fun ways to say things in everyday situations. Included are sections on Māori idiom and metaphor, common errors, useful phrases, and examples of language in use in a vaiety of settings, including in the home, at the supermarket, at the beach, and on the sports field”–back cover.

Syndetics book coverTū / nā Patricia Grace ; nā Wiremu rāua ko Te Ohorere Kaa i whakamāori.
“The only survivor of three young men who went to war from his family, Tū faces the past and tells his niece and nephew, through the pages of his war journal, what really happened to the brothers as the Māori Battalion fought the war in Italy”–Publisher information. This is the Te Reo version of Patricia Graces’ narrative of the story of Tu.

Syndetics book coverNew Zealand tattoo : in the home of the tattooist’s art / Chris Hoult ; text by Steve Forbes” [This book] presents the view from a cross-section of tattoo studios in 2012. Featuring photography of the tattooists and the tattooed, it profiles over 20 leading artists and gives insights into both the history and the renaissance of all three traditions: tā moko (Māori tattoo), tatau (Pacific Islands tattoo) and tattoo (European and Asian forms)”.–back cover.

Syndetics book coverIf I only had time / John Rowles with Angus Gillies.
“Here [John Rowles] speaks candidly with Angus Gillies, noting the tremendous achievements as well as the pressures and mishaps along the way. An irrepressible optimist, John tells a story that’s full of humour and is hard to put down.”–inside jacket. An easy read, but fascinating tale of the boy from Kawerau who made it to London, Las Vegas, Hawai’i and everywhere in between.

Syndetics book coverArt New Zealand ; no. 144 (Summer 2012-13)
p. 52. Waharua kopito : Māori cloaks at Te Papa by Peter Ireland.

(Kahu ora = living cloaks)-
“Fautlessly crafted by curator Awhina Tamarapa, Kahu ora manifests what was made plain by her scholarly accessible, beautifully designed and produced book, Whatu kakahu / Maori cloaks published last year – where eight specialist pooled their knowledge to give the most comprehensive account to date of this key strand of Maori culture”–p. 52-3.(Te Papa )

Historical review (Bay of Plenty journal of history) ; vol. 60, no. 2 ; (November 2012)
p. 49. Saving Te Urewera heritage by Dean Flavell
p. 52. Mataatua wharenui : the long journey home by Dr Ian Shearer
p. 55. Te Koputu a Te Whanga a Toi, Whakatane Library and Exhibition Centre

Five Theses:
Village of peace, village of war : Parihaka stories 1881-2004 / Rachel Anne Buchanan.

Conceptualising wairuatanga : rituals, relevance and realities for teachers : a dissertation in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Teaching and Learning in the University of Canterbury / by Gipsy Foster.

Poia mai taku poi : unearthing the knowledge of the past : a critical review of written literature on the poi in New Zealand and the Pacific : a thesis submitted for the degree of Master of Arts at the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand / Karyn Ailsa Paringatai.
The primary objective of this thesis is to review literature written about poi in order to construct an historical overview of poi from pre-contact Māori society until the 1920s. The mythological and Polynesian origins of poi, traditional and contemporary materials and methods used to make poi, early travellers, explorers, and settlers accounts of poi and two case studies on the use of poi in the Taranaki and Te Arawa areas will be included in this thesis. The information will be used to show the changes in poi that have occured since Māori and European arrival to New Zealand until the 1920s.

He tānga ngutu, he Tūhoetanga te Mana Motuhake o te tā moko wāhine: the identity politics of moko kauae : a thesis submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand / by Rawinia R. Higgins.
Tā moko (Māori tattooing), especially facial moko (tattoo), has become a popular mechanism for the expression of self determination. Many Māori people are adopting this art form as part of a renaissance of Māori culture in Aotearoa/New Zealand. This declaration of Māori self-determination is also an assertion of the pride felt by the tangata whenua (people of the land) for their culture, their language and more, importantly, their identity. This thesis will illustrate how moko kauae (female chin tattooing) is a means of expressing Māori identity with specific reference to Tūhoe identity. Using an Indigenous theoretical framework this Māori Studies thesis examines the historical and contemporary political dimensions of moko kauae, the interface with the Māori worldview (inclusive of its cultural concepts), and its relationship to identity politics. This will be complimented by the personal stories of Tūhoe women who have undertaken moko kauae as well as commentaries from other Tūhoe people who express what their Tūhoetanga means to them and their lives.

Challenging appropriation : modern moko and western subculture / by Ridgely Dunn.

Re-colonisation and indigenous resistance : neoliberalism in the Pacific / Ema Maria Bargh.

Akoranga, huaranga, pakanga

Akoranga, huaranga, me te pakanga : ngā pukapuka hou

Syndetics book coverKia tangi te tītī : permission to speak : successful schooling for Māori students in the 21st century : issues, challenges and alternatives / edited by Paul Whitinui.
“This book brings together academic contributions from the fields of mātauranga, mātauranga hinengaro, whakaako hauora, akoranga takakau-ā-ora and others.”–back cover. Contributors include Joanna Kidman, Hana O’Regan, Tom Cavanagh, Anne-Marie Hunt, Angus MacFarlane, Tangiwai Rewi, Lesley Rameka, Wharehuia Hemara, Janie Tito, Paul Whitinui, Hector Kaiwai, Christine Rubie-Davies, Helen Timperley, Judy Parr, Gary Raumati-Hook, Lynne Parehaereone Raumati, Tania Ka’ai, Melinda Webber.

Syndetics book coverSmall holes in the silence : collected works / Hone Tuwhare.
“Hone Tuwhare died in 2008, having published 10 different new collections and becoming one of this country’s best-loved poets. But his books have mostly gone out of print”–annotation.
“This volume showcases the finest examples of Hone’s poetry, from his early triumph in No ordinary Sun right up to his final works, published when he was in his eighties. Also included are a handful of previously unpublished poems as well as a number translated into Māori by Patu Hohepa, Selwyn Muru and Waihoroi Shortland”–back cover.

Syndetics book coverGuns and utu : a short history of the musket wars. by Matthew Wright. Penguin, 2011.
” In the two decades before the Treaty of Waitangi, New Zealand underwent island-spanning waves of warfare, extreme violence and cannibalism… These dramatic conflicts were not simply ‘musket’wars. They were part of a wide-ranging response by Māori to the first culture-contact in their history – exposing all the realities of the human condition. This was an age of courage, heroism, great character and astonishing deeds”.–back cover

Syndetics book coverTōku reo, tōku ohooho : ka whawhai tonu mātou = My language, my inspiration : the struggle continues / Chris Winitana.
“E āta raupapatia atu ana e Tōku reo, Tōku ohooho, ngā hinonga whakahirahira a te iwi Māori ki te tō mai i tōna reo mai i te pō kerekere ki te ao mārama. Mai i te petihana mō te reo i te tau 1972 ki 2008, he whakaatu i te whakatieke a te iwi Māori ki te pupuri i tōna reo, ā, he kōrero tahi hoki ki te kōiti a rangapū i te hāputa o te riri nā rātau te reo i whakaora.”–i muri i te pukapuka.

Syndetics book coverMy language, my inspiration : the struggle continues = Tōku reo, tōku ohooho: ka whawhai tonu mātou / Chris Winitana.
“My language, my inspiration – details the concerted efforts of Māori to ensure the survival of the Māori language and bring it out of the shadows and into the world of light. From the petition for the Māori language in 1972 up to 2008, it describes the events that led to the revitalisation of the Māori language and interviews the people who were central to the revival.”–back cover.

Syndetics book coverA simple nullity? : the Wi Parata case in New Zealand law and history / David V. Williams.
The New Zealand Supreme Court in ruling on Wi Parata v the Bishop of Wellington in 1877, concerning land use and ownership at Whitireia, dismissed the relevance of the Treaty of Waitangi as a simple nullity. This case has been seen as symbolic of the neglect of Maori rights by settlers, the government, and New Zealand law. Williams takes a fresh look at the case,with new insights into both Maori-Pakeha relations in the 19th century and the legal position of the treaty.– summary of comment on back cover.

To the gateways of Florence : New Zealand forces in Tuscany, 1944 / edited by Stefano Fusi ; [translation, Jill Gabriel].
Contents include: The price of citizenship: Maori involvement in the Italian Campaign / Monty Soutar.
“From 21 July to 4 August 1944, the Chianti area of Tuscany was the scene of bloody fighting as Allied forces waged a bitter battle to wrest Florence from German hands… But research by [the] then mayor of Tavarnelle, Stefano Fusi, and his wife Jill Gabriel, herself a New Zealander, confirmed that it had been soldiers of the 25th Maori Battalion who had led the offensive through much of Chianti…” Book flap.

Sites : a journal of social anthropology & cultural studies ; vol 8, no. 1 (2011)
Special issue: Organ and Xeno transplantation edited by Rhonda Shaw.
Includes: p. 40. Whanau, whakapapa and identity in experiencesof organ donation and transplantation by Robert Webb & Rhonda Shaw.
“This article is based upon qualitative interviews with Maori and their whanau, and explores research into the direct experiences and perspectives of Maori on organ or tissue donation and transplantation. ” — Abstract p. 40.