John Miller – in conversation about his historic photographs of the Māori Land March

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Photographer John Miller with one of his photographs of the Māori Land March when it arrived in Wellington on October 13 1975. John was photographed at Te Unga Waka Marae in Auckland, at the commemorations of the 40th anniversary of the March in September 2015. Credit: John Miller

Acclaimed documentary photographer John Miller (Ngāpuhi) has documented social and political dissent and cultural events for more than four decades.  John photographed the Wellington section of the 1975 Māori Land March; from Porirua to its arrival at Parliament grounds.  The photographs have become well-known following their reproduction in books, exhibitions and school resources. In this session, John will talk with Paul Diamond about his photographs of the Māori Land March, and his involvement with the march organisers, Te Roopu o te Matakite.

A Wellington City Libraries talk, organised in partnership with the National Library, as part of the Turnbull Gallery exhibition, ‘Not one more acre’: The Māori Land March 40 years on.

Supported by LIANZA Te Upoko o Te Ika a Maui regional group.

When: 12.30-1.30pm, Wednesday 21 October
Where: Ground floor, Wellington Central Library
Cost: Free

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The Māori Land March on the Wellington motorway, October 13 1975.
Credit: John Miller

Syndetics book coverHīkoi : forty years of Māori protest / Aroha Harris.
“What have Maori been protesting about? What has been achieved? This book provides an overview of the contemporary Maori protest ‘movement’, a summary of the rationale behind the actions, and a wonderful collection of photographs of the action u the protests, the marches and the toil behind the scenes. And it provides a glimpse of the fruits of that protest u the Waitangi Tribunal and the opportunity to prepare, present and negotiate Treaty settlements; Maori language made an official language; Maori-medium education; Maori health providers; iwi radio and, in 2004, Maori television.” (Syndetics summary)

Whina : a biography of Whina Cooper / Michael King.

Syndetics book coverRaupatu : the confiscation of Māori land / edited by Richard Boast and Richard S. Hill.

Beautiful books

The illustrated history, Tangata Whenua stands as a colossus amongst this month’s selection of books, but there are other remarkable books such as the story of Richard Nunns and Māori music, and the very readable snippets of life from Witi Ihimaera. Local poet, Apirana Taylor publishes his latest collection of poetry and Hōne Sadler’s Ngāpuhi narrative (in te reo Māori) will be treasured by his people and all speakers of te reo. The Walters whānau have recorded the stories of wharenui of the motu in another beautifully illustrated book.

Syndetics book coverThe Healthy Country? : A History of Life & Death in New Zealand
“In this book, Alistair Woodward and Tony Blakely tell the extraordinary story of life and death in Aotearoa New Zealand from first Maori settlement to the 21st century. Did Maori or Europeans live longer in 1769? How did Pakeha New Zealanders become the healthiest, most long lived people on the face of the globe (and why did Maori not enjoy the same life expectancy)? What caused New Zealanders’ health and longevity to be surpassed by other nations in the late twentieth century?… ‘The Healthy Country?’ is important reading for anyone interested in the story of New Zealanders and a decisive intervention in debates about health, disease and medicine.” (Syndetics summary)
Chap. 1. Before Cook : the long history of human longevity
Chap. 2. Māori majority : the first hundred years after Cook
Chap. 4. Decline and recovery ; Māori from 1860-1940

Polynesian legends and other poems / by A. Stanley Sherratt ; edited by Mark Pirie ; introduction by Dr Michael O’Leary.

Syndetics book coverTe ara puoro : a journey into the world of Māori music / Richard Nunns with Allan Thomas.
“Te Ara Puoro tells the story of Richard Nunn’s remarkable journey; of how fragments of knowledge given by elders were pieced together through countless presentations and performances on marae the length and breadth of the country; of how the instruments were re-created and developed; and of how he subsequently mastered their playing. The book gathers together an enormous amount of the current knowledge about taonga puoro, and will undoubtedly be the most important written resource in existence on the subject. It also charts the many other paths that Richard has taken with the music, including the huge variety of recordings he has done, his sound-track work, and his playing in other genres, such as free jazz and classical”–Publisher website.

The Mangatū remedies report / Waitangi Tribunal.
“This publication is the outcome of a Supreme Court directed Waitangi Tribunal hearing. In 1961, the Crown had purchased 8,522 acres of land in the Mangatū 1 block north of Gisborne for the establishment of a forest to prevent hill country erosion and downstream flooding. The Tribunal had earlier found that the Crown had breached the Treaty of Waitangi when it acquired this land, and in the current inquiry, four claimant groups – the Mangatū Incorporation, Te Aitanga a Māhaki and Affiliates, Ngā Ariki Kaipūtahi, and Te Whānau a Kai – sought binding recommendations relating to the Mangatū Crown forest licensed lands. The Tribunal strongly urged the applicants to reunite and return to negotiations with the Crown.”–Publisher information.

Koowhiti / editorial panel: Tanemahuta Gray, Merenia Gray, Jennifer Stevenson, Peter Cleave, Paul Moon and Linda Ashley.

Syndetics book coverMāori boy : a memoir of childhood / Witi Ihimaera.“This honest, stirring work tells of the family and community into which Ihimaera was born, of his early life in rural New Zealand, of family secrets, of facing anguish and challenges, and of laughter and love. As Ihimaera recounts the myths that formed his early imagination, he also reveals the experiences from real life that wriggle into his fiction. Alive with an inventive, stimulating narrative and vividly portrayed relatives, this memoir is engrossing, entertaining and moving, but, more than this, it is also a vital record of what it means to grow up Māori”–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverMarae : te tatau pounamu : a journey around New Zealand’s meeting houses / Muru, Robin & Sam Walters. “A documentation of and tribute to New Zealand’s wharenui, big and small … Includes detailed shots of their carvings, kōwhaiwhai panels, tukutuku panels and much more. Many are photographed during an event”–Publisher information.
“For three years Muru, Robin and Sam Walters visited this country’s marae to bring together a beautiful photographic book on the meeting house… this handsome book captures the huge variety of New Zealand’s original architecture”–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverPuna wai kōrero : an anthology of Māori poetry in English / edited by Reina Whaitiri and Robert Sullivan.
“Two leading Māori scholars collect Māori poetic voices in English and let flow a wellspring of poetry. From both revered established writers as well as exciting new voices, the poems in Puna Wai Korero offer a broad picture of Maori poetry in English. The voices are many and diverse: confident, angry, traditional, respectful, experimental, despairing and full of hope, expressing a range of poetic techniques and the full scope of what it is to be Māori”–Publisher’s website.

Syndetics book coverTangata whenua : an illustrated history / Atholl Anderson, Judith Binney, Aroha Harris.
“Tangata Whenua portrays the sweep of Māori history from Pacific origins to the twenty-first century. Through narrative and images, it offers an overview of the past, grounded in specific localities and histories”–Publisher information.

Syndetics book coverThe breathing tree : new poems / Apirana Taylor.
“This collection offers forty new poems from popular poet Apirana Taylor. Inspired by nature and mythology, he shifts his focus from the mundane to the mysterious”–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverPrendergast : legal villain? / Grant Morris.
“James Prendergast is the most infamous figure in New Zealand’s legal history, known mainly for his condemnation of the Treaty of Waitangi as “a simple nullity” in 1877. But during his lifetime Prendergast was a highly respected lawyer and judge. He was arguably New Zealand’s dominant legal professional from 1865 to 1899, and his good reputation remained intact until the 1980s, when the Treaty of Waitangi finally returned to the centre of New Zealand political life. The more the Treaty has been celebrated, the more Prendergast has been condemned. “–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverPēwhairangi : Bay of Islands missions and Māori 1814 to 1845 / Angela Middleton.
“… It is the story of New Zealand’s first permanaent European settlement at Hoki and the church mission that it represented, and of the other mission communities subsequently established in the Bay of Islands, at Kerikeri, Paihia, Waimate and Te Puna. It is a story of Ngāpuhi and Pākehā engagement, as neighbours, over four decades.”–Back cover.

Syndetics book coverKo tautoro, te pito o tōku ao : a Ngāpuhi narrative / Hōne Sadler.
“Sadler illustrates the unbroken chain of Ngāpuhi sovereignty by looking in-depth at his own hapū of Ngāti Moerewa, Ngāti Rangi and Ngāi Tawake ki te Waokū of Tautoro and Matarāua. The narrative is told through weaving together karakia and whakapapa, histories and kōrero that have been part of the oral traditions of Ngāpuhi’s whānau, hapū and iwi and handed down through the generations on marae and other gathering places”–Publisher information.

Syndetics book coverTurning the hearts of the children : early Māori leaders in the Mormon Church / edited by Selwyn Kātene.
“History of Church of Latter-day Saints involvement with Māori in NZ, with chapters based on 12 early prominent Māori figures”–Publisher information. “…Mormons did not reject traditional Māori socio-cultural mores. They shared reverence for family and genealogy and were guided by visions and dreams”–back cover. Profiled: Hirini Whaanga, Raihi Ngāwaka, Whatahoro Jury, Ngāhuia Chase, Percy Going, Hōhepa Heperi, Te Rāwhiti Paerata, Stuart Meha, Wetekia Elkington, Sidney Christy, Pare Takana (Duncan), Tūrake Manuirirangi.

Aotearoa New Zealand social work ; vol. 24, no. 4 (Review ed., 2014)
p. 65. Spirituality and social work : introducing a spiritual dimension into social work education and practice by Carol Phillips.

Archaeology in New Zealand ; vol. 57, no. 4 (December 2014)
P. 199. New Zealand’s settlement date : the last word? (or at least the latest) by Garry Law.
An instant vote taken without warning, at the 2014 NZAA Conference requesting participants to nominate a single AD date “for the earliest settlement of New Zealand by ancestors of the Maori.” 51 votes were accepted.

New Zealand journal of educational studies ; vol. 49, no. 2 (2014)
p. 176. Researching identity with indigenous D/deaf youth by Anne Hynds, Susan Faircloth, Clint Green and Helen Jacob.
p. 205. Representing Māori youth voices in community education research by Joanna Kidman.

New Zealand journal of history ; vol. 48, no. 2 (October 2014)
p. 50. Solidarity across the ‘colour line’ : Māori representation in the Maoriland worker, 1910-1914 by Cybele Locke.
p. 119. A window for revisionism : presenting te Tiriti in the Primary school bulletins, 1957 by Rachael Bell.

New Zealand legacy ; vol. 26, no. 1 (2014)
p. 20. The problematic portraits of Pomare II by Keith Giles.

New Zealand legacy ; vol. 26, no. 3 (2014)
p. 5. William Swanson Read Bloomfield (1885-1968) ; was he the first architect with Māori ancestry? by Denys Oldham.
p. 17. Well off the beaten track ; the site of New Zealand’s first Roman Catholic mass by Robin Astridge.

Oral history in New Zealand ; vol. 26 (2014)
p. 31. Tuia te ao marama : oral histories with Māori mental health nurses by Maria baker, Tio Sewell & Hineroa Hakiaha.